this is a 50 year old woman

another thing that is amazing about Wonder Woman that I haven’t heard anybody bring up is that the two strongest Amazons are both played by women in their 50s. Which is NOT old, but in Hollywood years they’re like seniors on their death beds. Once women reach a certain age, they stop getting action roles like that; if WW had been made by a dude, 100 percent Hippolyta and Antiope would have been played by women like 5 years older than Gal.

Hey fun fact the people 28 and over on this website actually do KNOW that the average age skews much lower so like, reminding us is pretty pointless?

More to the point, as much as you guys are way better at identifying and calling out misogyny than I was at your age, a lot of people are really terrible at picking up on one particular kind of misogyny, and that is the creepy upper age limit for space and existence you’re setting for women in your communities.

This may not be easy to instantly identify because it’s not really ageism across the board, for example, this idea that fandom has an upper age limit is not something that effects a lot of men in fandom. Women, on the other hand, are apparently expected to re-direct their fan obsession, fixation, or hobby to things like crafting, child-rearing, and housekeeping just as soon as they become a mom or reach that “typical mom” age. Adult fangirls are “immature” and “need to grow up,” while adult fanboys are literally just a fact of life, as if we both haven’t always been there.

Whenever you question a woman’s right to this space because of her age or parental status, you are reinforcing a stereotype that has effects that reach beyond that one situation. The expectation, for example, that 40 year old men be catered to when writing comics, but that characters of interest to 40 year old women are obsolete or unprofitable.

When actresses over 30 are written out of their franchises or written exclusively in villain/mother/crone roles, this not only furthers the impression that women over 30 have no interest in these franchises, but actually causes women over 30 to disengage with these franchises as a self fulfilling prophecy. A sudden loss of representation can be a real buzzkill, as many of you already know too well.

Women over 30 are often sexual and a lot of us get fan crushes or thirst at the exact same rate as younger people do, but you’re not going to hear about it because every one of us has been shamed at one point or another for expressing desire for age-appropriate fictional characters that was totally acceptable when we were five years younger. Add to that dissonance the fact that A LOT of you are fixated on and thirsting after characters that are actually closer to OUR age if not our age exactly.

Hell, we transfer directly from EVERYONE wanting to hear about our desires and attractions to people being equally disgusted. This is pretty dissonant on a website stuffed full of explicitly sexual material, and it’s especially difficult and heartbreaking for the 30+ year olds who JUST CAME OUT and get an extra level of taboo on top of what is most likely a heaping dose of internalized homophobia.

And I know it’s coming so I’m just going to head it off at the pass, this OBVIOUSLY does not mean that you need to engage in any overtly sexual topic with an older person if that discomfits you, and it doesn’t even mean you need to INTERACT with us, because well, you don’t HAVE to interact with anyone on this website if you don’t want to.

But realize what you’re doing when your reaction to the desire of a 30 year old woman to a 30 year old fictional character is revulsion or a suggestion that she is over-sharing. Notice your shock when you realize that older women inhabit the fandom and recognize that that shock has nothing to do with those women.

Pay attention to the double standard that allows you to embrace rude bigoted 50 year old male comic creators/collectors and equally feel like there’s something wrong or stunted about a woman into the same things. Think about it because that stuff will sneak up on you, and you are probably pretty sure that you’re not going to turn 28 and magically drop all your interests, because no one should expect you to.

I recently saw a video of a young woman talking about all of the reasons our generation, the Millennials, sucks and that’s she’s sorry for what we’ve become. Here is my, a fellow Millennial, response:

You say we’re just ‘existing’ and not ‘contributing anything to society.’ The oldest Millennial is 34, the youngest is 12, we haven’t had time to contribute anything yet. We’re trying to survive in a world that no other generation has had to grow up in, with a tanked economy and most of our childhood hearing nothing but war in the Middle East on the news while also being profoundly connected. We didn’t do that.

You say we’re no longer polite, we don’t say ‘no, sir’ or ‘no ma’am’ anymore and we no longer hold the door open for our elders or women. We also don’t expect low-paid workers to break their backs for us, or at yell at them when they make a mistake, like my 60-year-old grandfather does. We say ‘no problem’ when there’s a mistake in order, and politely stand by while the 40-something-year-old soccer mom huffs and rolls her eyes as the new girl struggles to punch in the correct code.

You say our music objectifies women and glorifies drugs and criminals. There has been no significant change from the songs that were once sung or the singers who sang them. Many of the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s performers were drug addicts, womanizers, and criminals in their own right. Elvis Presley was child abuser, John Lennon raped his many girlfriends and most of the music I grew up listening, which was 80’s rock, were performed by habitual drug abusers. Let’s not pretend like human nature took a drastic turn when 1983 rolled around.

You say we cuss to prove a point. We, as a generation, have learned it’s not the words we fucking use, it’s the passion in them that we care about. As a generation, we’ve become more interested in politics and the world around us, cursing is minor problem when we consider the political climate the older generation has plunged us into.

You say we use ‘bae’ to describe the ones we love. Bae, originally, means ‘before anyone else’ which is incredibly romantic in my opinion. Bae is also hardly ever taken seriously, it’s a jokey way to talk about someone you love. Language changes, I doubt people were happy when we changed ‘wherefore’ into ‘why.’ The greatest injustice we can do to our language and culture is not allow it to evolve and grow with us.

You say we idolize people like Kim Kardashian and shame people like Tim Tebow. Kim Kardashian is a business woman who had a private video she made with a lover illegally revealed. Instead of fading into obscurity, she stood tall and did not let the sexual shaming she endured stop her and now runs a multi-million dollar industry, is married to one of the richest men in the world, and had two beautiful children. Tim Tebow is a Christian who was criticized by a few people for praying in an open stadium while most people just wanted to see a game.

You say we’re lazy and entitled, we want to make a lot of money and get a free education but we’re not willing to put in the work. We are not lazy. I cannot tell you how many people I meet who have gone to school full time while working a part or even full-time job just to make ends meet. We’re not entitled, we’re bitter. In the 70’s, you could work a part time job over the summer and pay your way through four years of school because tuition was $400, now just to walk in the door of your local community college you need to drop $14,000. We have kids who aren’t even old enough to drink, yet are already $20,000 deep in debt. Debt that won’t go away because even filing for bankruptcy won’t erase it. And even with that education, there’s no guarantee you’ll find something in your field. I have a friend who has a degree in microbiology and she’s making $9 an hour selling $15 candles. I have another friend who has a masters in Sport Psychology and Counseling. She’s a bartender. My parents bought a three bedroom house in the suburbs in the late 90’s while my generation is imagining apartments with breezy windows and trying to get enough money to get food while we scrounge up less than $8 a week.

You say we spend more time online making friends and less time building relationships and our relationship’s appearance on Facebook is more important than building the foundation that relationship is based on. We are a generation that is profoundly connected and no other generation has seen this before. We have more opportunities to meet people from all over the world and better chances to understand other worldviews and lifestyles. Being able to stay home and talk to people over the internet is cheaper and more relaxing than having to force yourself to interact with people in public settings after a long day of minimum wage labor. The people I talk to more over the internet are people I have been friends with for years. It’s easier to talk about the day’s events over Skype or Facebook Messenger than arrange a day to meet in person when you have conflicting schedules. I truly don’t believe most people care what others think of their friendship or how their relationships ‘look’ on social media. Most often what you are calling ‘our relationship’s appearance on Facebook’ are documented and searchable memories.

You say our idea of what we believe in is going on Facebook and posting a status on Facebook. Not everyone can join in with the crowds of protesters. It’s easy to see what others have to say through the comments and argue back without the threat of violence. And when this generation does organize events to stand up for ourselves, it’s met with childish name-calling or being reduced to a ‘riot.’

You say we believe the number of follows we have reflects who we are as a person. It’s nice knowing there’s 20 or 50 or maybe even 100 people who care what you have to say or think. We live in an age where we can and will be heard.

You say we don’t respect our elders, that we don’t respect our country. Our elders grew up in one of the greatest economic booms in history and in turn made it the worst economic situation since the 1930’s all while blaming kids who were only five at the time for it. We stand on our flag because it means nothing, it’s a pretty banner for an ugly lie. We’re a country that says you can make it if you just work hard enough while, in the end, that will almost never happen. We’re a country that becomes irate at the idea of 20-something college kids standing on some canvas dyed red, white, and blue but seem to shrug off the millions of homeless, disabled veterans.

You say we’re more divided than ever before. Ever before what? When black folk couldn’t drink from the same fountain as white folk? When women couldn’t vote? When white southerners fought for the idea that they could keep black people as slaves? We’re a generation that is done with injustice and when you fight for social change, you will divide people.

You say everything that was frowned up is celebrated. What does that mean? We frowned up gay marriage. We frowned upon wives being able to say no to sex with their husbands. We frowned up interracial marriage. We frowned up black folk being allowed to go to school with white folk. We frowned upon women being allowed to vote. Are those things not worth celebrating?

You say nothing has value in our generation, that we take advantage of everything. We value friendship more, we value the fists of change, we value social justice and family and the right to marry those we love. We value the right to be yourself, wholly and fully. We value the right to choose and we value the idea of fighting what you believe in, even when everyone older than you is telling you you’re what’s wrong with the country.

You say we have more opportunities to succeed than those before but we don’t ‘appreciate’ them. We are a bitter generation. You can finance a boat for 3.9% but you have to pay back college tuition plus 8.9%. We may have more opportunities but those opportunities cost money we don’t have.

You say you can see why we’re called ‘Generation,’ but we’re not Generation Y, we’re Millennials and we do feel entitled. We were promised a strong economy and inexpensive education. We had the world in our hands and we were going to make it better. And it was ripped away from us because of incompetent rulers, illegal wars, and greedy corporations and we get blamed for it. Crime has gone down, abortion and unintended pregnancy has lowered, people are living longer, people are more educated, people are less likely to die from violent crime or diseases, yet my generation is touted as the worst generation and for what? Crimes that we’re accused of that happened before we could even wipe our own ass? We were raised better, and we were raised in a society that treated, and continues to treat, us like garbage. And we are done. We are not sorry, we did nothing wrong.

Black Stunt woman Appreciation

Since the news about the death of stunt woman Joi Harris on the set of Deadpool 2 I thought we should big up some of the real Black Superheros

Kelsee King-Devoreaux

Professional stunt double, coordinator and author since the early 90′s. She was Jada Pinkett’s double for the Matrix. King-Devoreaux has spoken out against white stunt performers donning Blackface to double for Black actors when there are many Black performers who are capable and struggle to look for work.  

Angela Meryl

Actress, author and stunt performer extraordinaire. Who hasn’t the veteran and Taurus Award nominee doubled for Halle Berry, Beyoncé, Gabrielle Union, Rihanna, Vivica A. Fox

Natascha Hopkins

Hopkins has doubled for Halle Berry in numerous films but also Kerry Washington in Scandal

Amanda Foster

Born in Essex, this single mother of 3 was a hustling a supply teacher, model and film extra. When she was on the set of Patriot Games she heard there were no Black women stunt performers in the UK. She then started training to become the first. 50 years old and still doing YAS! 

Damita Jane Howard

Howard is the go to stunt woman for our faves doubling for Danai Gurira on The Walking Dead and Angela Bassett on American Horror Story.

Jazzy Ellis 

Independent filmaker, activist and stunt double.

Jwaundace Candece

Stunt woman, actress, writer, producer, and professional wrestler. WOW

April Weeden-Washington

She was a slayer. Nuff said. But really with skills like horse riding and martial arts Weeden has been slaying since forever.

Cheryl Lewis

Cheryl Lewis can do it all. Not only is she a pro stunt woman but she is a dancer, actor, aerialist, puppeteer and is trained in multiple disciplines of martial arts. She doubles for Simone Missick’s Misty Knight in Luke Cage.

Shellita Boxie

Started doing stunt work since 2008 and has worked on many big movies including the hunger games and Girls’ Trip

5

Remember Grenfell a year on and all those who died in what was an entirely preventable tragedy in so many ways. Remember all the people who died in that tower block fire, that social housing block. Vulnerable people. Send your love to their family and close ones and ALWAYS question why it and things like it happened. Don’t ever stop fighting for justice for Grenfell and it’s victims. Rest in Peace all 71 victims.

- 23-year-old man, Mohammad Alhajali;
- 24-year-old woman, Ya-Haddy Sisi Saye, also known as Khadija Saye;
- 65-year-old man, Anthony Disson;
- 39-year-old man, Abufars Ibrahim;
- 52-year-old woman, Khadija Khalloufi;
- 52-year-old woman, Mary Mendy;
- 77-year-old man, Abdeslam Sebbar;
- five-year-old boy, Isaac Paulos;
- (Age and surname un-identified) woman, Sheila;
- 26-year-old woman, Gloria Trevisan;
- 27-year-old man, Marco Gottardi;
- 29-year-old woman Berkti Haftom;
- 32-year-old woman Zainab Deen;
- 61-year-old man, Hamid Kani;
- 13-year-old boy, Yahya Hashim;
- 82-year-old man, Ali Jafari;
- 68-year-old woman, Majorie Vital;
- 12-year-old girl, Jessica Urbano Ramirez;
- 35-year-old woman, Nura Jemal;
- two-year-old boy, Jeremiah Deen;
- 20-year-old man, Yasin El Wahabi;
- 44-year-old man, Hashim Kedir;
- 12-year-old girl, Firdaws Hashim;
- 45-year-old woman, Deborah Lamprell;
- 65-year-old woman, Sakina Afrasehabi;
- 50-year-old man, Ernie Vital;
- 56-year-old man, Denis Murphy;
- 63-year-old man, Raymond Bernard;
- 12-year-old boy, Biruk Haftom;
- 27-year-old woman, Amna Mahmud Idris;
- eight-year-old boy Mehdi El-Wahabi;
- 15-year-old girl, Nur Huda El-Wahabi;
- six-year-old boy Yaqub Hashim;
- 24-year-old woman, Amal Ahmedin;
- three-year-old girl, Amaya Tuccu-Ahmedin;
- 78-year-old woman, Ligaya Moore.
- 71-year-old woman, Victoria King
- 40-year-old woman, Alexandra Atala

Baby Logan Gomes who was stillborn in hospital on 14 June 2017, has also been recorded by police as a victim of the fire.

A total of 32 other people have been formally identified but have not been named at the request of their families.

I realized one more amazing thing about last night's episode of Supergirl

That episode was incredibly female centric but more so than that, 4 key players in the episode (Lillian, Cat, Rhea and the President) were women over 50 years old.

It’s rare enough to get a woman over 50 on TV at all, more rare it is to have that woman be a key player in the plot line.

Having 4 female characters, all completely different and amazingly complex in a show and have them all be incredibly important to the story is unheard of.

2

The unsolved murder of the “Isdal Woman” has haunted Norway for almost 50 years. The story began on the brisk afternoon of the 29th of November, 1970. A man and his two young daughters were hiking along Isdalen Valley in Bergen, Norway. As they climbed across the rocks and underbrush, they spotted the body of a woman lying on the rocks in a pugilistic attitude, meaning she had been set alight. The body was burnt all over the front, including her face and hair. However, she was not burnt on the back. Due to the fire damage, she was unrecognisable.

Several objects were found at the scene: jewellery, a watch, sleeping tablets, bottles that smelt like petrol, a silver spoon, and a broken umbrella. Bizarrely, the jewellery was not on her person but scattered around her body. “It looked like there had been some kind of ceremony,” said forensic investigator, Tormod Bones. An autopsy concluded that the woman died from Fenenal and carbon-monoxide poisoning; she had ingested over 50 pills. Due to the smoke particles in her lungs, she had been alive when she was burning. Adding to the mystery of her identification, all of the production labels had been cut off her clothes and filed off the objects. Furthermore, her face and neck showed signs of bruising and her fingerprints had been sanded away. Somebody certainly didn’t want her being identified.

She was described as being 5 feet 4.5 inches tall with long brownish-black hair and brown eyes. She was estimated to be between 25 and 40 years old. Police shortly discovered two suitcases belonging to the woman at a nearby railway station. Inside the suitcases they discovered money, clothing, rubber boots, several wigs, a comb and hairbrush, silver spoons, glasses and a prescription for eczema cream. If investigators thought this was going to be the smoking gun in identifying the “Isdal Woman” then they would be sorely disappointed. Once again, any identifying features were removed. It was noted that one item of clothing that was found, a dress, was particularly provocative and had an Italian style.

Several witnesses who claim to have met her came forward. They told how she wore wigs and could speak a plethora of different languages. She stayed in several hotels and used fake names. Even more bizarre, if she stayed in a hotel more than one night, she would always request to change room. It was assumed that she must have had numerous fake passports as they were needed to check in to the hotels. As this was during the Cold War, many people theorised that she was a spy. Investigators eventually concluded that she had committed suicide however many experts disagree. From the remote spot to where her body was found and the method of suicide, it seems quite unlikely. Her identity still remains unknown, as does the reason she was murdered or ended her life.

“I have this reputation from ‘insiders’ for being difficult, but people only considered me difficult because I wouldn’t just agree with everything they said. Like, 50-year-old men telling me how to be a woman! Seriously, I used to get nagged about combing my hair. They would tell me I needed more makeup and that I had circles around my eyes. I’ve had that since elementary school – I used to get called zombie.”

Sky Ferreira

Radical Islamic terrorists inspired or directed by groups like ISIS and al-Qaeda do pose a clear threat to the US. There is no question about that. Before last night’s deadly shooting in Las Vegas, the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history occurred in June 2016 when an ISIS-inspired man opened fire in a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and wounding 53.

And ISIS-linked militants have killed or injured dozens of people in countries like England, France, and Canada so far this year, including two women killed in a stabbing attack in Marseille, France, and several people injured in a car-ramming attack in Edmonton, Canada, just this weekend.

But here at home, the bigger threat has come from a very different kind of attacker, one with no ties to religion generally or Islamist extremism specifically.

Here are just a few of the attacks that have occurred in 2017:

• Sunday night, a 64-year-old white man from Nevada opened fire on a crowd of more than 22,000 people at a country music festival in Las Vegas, killing more than 50 and wounding more than 200.

• In August, a 20-year-old white Nazi sympathizer from Ohio sped his car into a crowd of anti-racist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, killing a woman and injuring at least 19 others.

• In June, a 66-year-old white man from Illinois shot at Republican Congress members during an early morning baseball practice, severely wounding several people including Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, the House of Representatives Majority Whip.

• In March 2017, a 28-year-old white man from Baltimore traveled to New York City with the explicit aim of killing black men. He stabbed 66-year-old Timothy Caughman to death and was charged with terrorism by New York state authorities.

• In May, a 35-year-old white man from Oregon named Jeremy Joseph Christian began harassing Muslim teenagers on a train in Portland, telling them “We need Americans here!” Two men interceded; Christian then stabbed and killed them both.

In fact, between 2001 and 2015, more Americans were killed by homegrown right-wing extremists than by Islamist terrorists, according to a study by New America, a nonpartisan think tank in Washington, DC.

https://www.vox.com/world/2017/10/2/16396612/las-vegas-mass-shooting-terrorism-islam

Unusually Positioned Skull Found In Burial Cave In Sicily

Around 2,500 years ago, the skull of a woman who died of cancer was buried facing into an artificial cave dug out of the rock. Perhaps she was watching over the 50 people buried inside?

She was discovered near the town of Baucina, in Sicily, Italy. The woman was between 35 and 50 years old, and likely died of a cancer that spread to her skull, leaving 14 holes in it. Archaeologists are unsure exactly why she was placed there, and where the rest of her body is.

6

Pakistan’s Transgender Women, Long Marginalized, Mobilize For Rights

In a Muslim shrine in Lahore’s ancient quarter, men and women pray around the tomb of a local saint. They hurl garlands and flower petals toward the tomb, each from their own, gender-segregated side: men from the left, women from the right.On each side, transgender women lead the believers in song.Among the men, they sing flamenco-style laments. A teenage trans woman leads the women. They struggle to keep up with her urgent chants in praise of the Prophet Muhammad’s family. Across Pakistan, transgender women are a fixture in these Sufi shrines, which tend to be more tolerant than other religious sites. Inside these holy sites, they are revered as belonging to a sacred third gender — a legacy of ancient South Asian traditions that have embraced gender fluidity.

That reverence has all but disappeared outside the shrines.

For more than a century, transgender women were pushed to the margins. South Asia’s British colonial rulers outlawed their communities. In Pakistan (as in India), discrimination has continued, and transgender women frequently resort to begging and sex work to support themselves. They are often targeted for violence.

“In 70 years, Pakistan has bought transgenders to a position where they have no rights and no respect,” says Ashi, a 50-year-old trans woman in Lahore. “We are trying to regain our status in society.”

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Photos: Diaa Hadid/NPR

Marilyn Monroe at home at the Beverly Carlton in 1951. Photo by David Cicero.

It’s a very large image, let’s take a closer look.

She’s reading The Poetry and Prose of Heinrich Heine (1948), near her feet is the screenplay of her upcoming film Don’t Call Me Mother, which during production would be retitled, Don’t Bother to Knock. There’s a glass of wine or champagne next to the bouquet of flowers; under it, a 1950 edition of Dostoyevsky’s Crime and Punishment, a dictionary, and a photo of a man who suspiciously looks like Arthur Miller, whom she’d marry in 1956 (she had met him in 1951 and had told her acting coach, “That’s someone I could love forever.”).

(The very first book in the row behind her, Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People, is the adaptation by Arthur Miller.)

Also among her books: The Loyalty of Free Men (1951) by Alan Barth, Anna Karenina lying on top of Charlie Chaplin, many books on acting (Building a Character, Focus), and Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Her love of Russian literature had been ignited by her former sugar daddy, Russian-born Johnny Hyde, who had died a year before; and also by her acting coach, Natasha Lytess.

On the table in front of her are books about Michelangelo and Albrecht Dürer, and there’s one of those year-in-review books, from 1949.

Her mirror has been decorated with several pictures: Bruegel’s Portrait of an Old Woman (bottom left), A Woman by Modigliani, and Cézanne’s Card Players.

Finally, on top of the bookcase, in the corner, is a portrait of famed Italian actress, Eleonora Duse, who once remarked, “Away from the stage, I do not exist.”

“A lot of us were born in the 60′s. It was a big generation. A lot of things came out of the 60′s. Fantastic things. And a lot these things are still here. Like people who are 50. Like the brand Marc O’Polo. Like some of the cars that we loved. And we still make them shiny and drive around in them. So it’s a retro year and I’m part of it.” -Mads Mikkelsen

I really do wonder what was Sidious’s and the rest of those in high command’s reaction to finding out that Grand Admiral Thrawn and his spaceships have disappeared because freaking floating teleporting space whales took them.

Maybe that is why the battle of Yavin was considered the first major victory for the rebellion. Because no one believed what happened on Lothal…..