this coloring is the perfect example of this

anonymous asked:

Do you have any kind of process for picking colors for the backgrounds? They all seem to have really nice uniformity, and I would love to read up on how colors like that are picked (or if it's more intuition based). I do remember you mentioning that you also had help from another color lead before, so I was wondering how much of that they help out vs the colors you chose?

hey, thanks so much! this might get a lil long (as it always does!!) so bear with me.

firstly i want to say, there’s no right or wrong way to pick colors. every artist has their own palette they prefer and i think it’s super delightful to spend time developing your own special sense of color. so even though i’m explaining things in a “this is how you do it” sort of way, it’s not the only way! just my way. the best method to develop your own sense of color is to look at a LOT of art, look at a LOT of the world around you, and practice practice pratice.

at this point in my life i pick colors intuitively just because i think it’s something i’m naturally tuned into, and i’ve been doing it for a few years, so i don’t actively plan my palettes. but here are some things that i think about as i pick colors.

firstly, i want to go over hue, value, and saturation. i’m sure everyone knows these intuitively but i want to explain them in words. hue, value and saturation are what make up a color, and decide how colors differ from each other.

hue: what color the color actually is. red, purple, green, yellow, and everything in between.

value: how light or dark a color is. if you’re painting traditionally, adding more white or more black to a color lowers or raises its value.

saturation: how “pure” the color is vs how much neutral tone is in it.

here’s an example of all three:


this comes into play because a big mistake i see beginners make is that they pick a “just” color, and by that i mean they pick “just blue” or “just yellow”. imagine buying a set of oil paints and only using paints straight from the tube without ever mixing. it would be impossible! so i try to avoid picking “just” colors, except as for a complementary color (more on that in a bit). here are some variations of a red, for example.

so, the biggest thing for me when i pick colors is that i want them all to be friends. i want them all to have something in common so that they get along. i usually lose control of a painting when my colors feel to different from one another. so, i will usually start a painting with one color i know for sure i want, and “subordinate” other colors to it, meaning every other color i pick has to look good with that color. as to how you figure out what looks good and what doesn’t, that just takes time and lots of observation to build a personal opinion :) here’s an example from one of my paintings. in this case, the main color is the trees.

and here’s another from rick & morty, the main color is the sky this time.

now that that’s out of the way, i’m going to give you the Actual Cheat Sheet for color palettes. in color theory, there are 8 basic color schemes that are generally pleasing to look at. here they are.

i usually use an analogous palette or monochrome palette out of preference. the two examples above more or less fall into those categories. however, i also like to use split complementary because the complimentary color adds a LOT of contrast and visual interest. it’s great to use if you have a specific thing in a painting you want to draw attention to. here’s an example:

it doesn’t always have to be a perfect split complementary, just one color that differs from the “family” of colors that take up a majority of the piece. 

now! you might be wondering when’s the right time to subordinate a color, or where to put it, or how much of it to use, etc. and the answer is: CONTRAST. there is always visual interest in things that are different. i was rifling through my school notes and found these great types of contrast when working with color.

value: things that are light vs things that are dark.

hue: two colors that look different. I.E. yellow vs blue.

saturation: things that are saturated vs things that are desaturated.

proportion: note the example above. a majority of the painting is orange, so the green stands out because there is proportionally less of it.

temperature: things that are warm vs things that are cool.

complementary: red vs green, blue vs orange, yellow vs purple. when in doubt, these colors always contrast against each other because they have nothing in common (there is no red in green, etc).

simultaneous: this is a little advanced and i’m bad at explaining it, so please read up on it here. 

a super helpful exercise is to look at your favorite illustrations, paintings, photographs, designs, etc and assess which one of the 8 color schemes (linked above) it has, and which types (can be more than one) of contrast it has. we did this in school and it REALLY helped me look at color better. here’s part of the assignment i did, the artist is annette marnat.

so! that’s pretty much how i think about color and how i pick my colors! i hope it was somewhat helpful! there’s so so so so much about color theory i can’t even begin to cover, i highly urge you to watch some videos and read some books and articles to further your study. a great starting place would be this series of videos. these are made by my teacher Richard Keyes, i think he had a dvd or something. everything i’ve talked about so far i learned from him and he is an absolute expert in color. these videos are invaluable. if you take anything away from this post, let it be to watch these videos hahaha.

to answer your question about my color leads, every painting was a collaborative effort between the three of us, and sometimes other painters too. it was a very hands-on crew, so i can’t say any of the r&m bgs i did are 100% “mine”. however, i think my personal color sense is waaaay different than jason or phil’s, which made the process very interesting because we usually had 3 very different opinions hahaa. you can check out their work here and here to see what things they brought to the table in relation to my own contributions.

thank you for the ask! again, i hope this was helpful :)

Why the 1997 Disney Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” is the greatest movie ever made
  • Brandy is Cinderella
  • Remember Brandy? No? She was a big deal in the 90s because SHE’S WONDERFUL
  • She’s so sweet and wide-eyed and beautiful and strong and curious and exactly what Cinderella should be
  • She’s the QUEEN of back-handed insults 
  • She also takes NO SHIT from bros
  • This movie is so fucking COLORFUL (and I don’t even mean the casting -we’ll get to that) - like, they just use every fucking color that is visible to the human eye and splatter them over the sets and costumes and it’s GREAT 

  • WHITNEY HOUSTON IS THE MOTHERFUCKING FAIRY GODMOTHER
  • WHITNEY HOUSTON
  • THE START AND END OF THIS MOVIE IS JUST WHITNEY HOUSTON FLOATING THROUGH THE AIR SINGING AT THE CAMERA
  • Rodgers and Hammerstein’s music is re-orchestrated to have this weird 90s pop/R&B twinge (so many synths) and it’s so bizarre but also really wonderful?
  • Just in general, the orchestrations are amazing - they clearly spent half their budget on the orchestra
  • They clearly didn’t spend much money on the set - I’m pretty sure they filmed the whole movie on a disused part of Disneyland but it’s perfect. 
  • OKAY LET’S TALK ABOUT COLOR BLIND CASTING
  • THIS IS LITERALLY THE PERFECT EXAMPLE OF COLOR BLIND CASTING - NOT ONLY DID THEY MAKE A DIVERSE CAST BUT THE CASTING LITERALLY MAKES NO FUCKING SENSE AND IT JUST DOESN’T MATTER BECAUSE THERE IS NO RACISM IN FAIRYTALE LAND
  • The King & Queen are Whoopi Goldberg and Victor Garber and they have an ASIAN SON

  • Like, THESE TWO PEOPLE PRODUCED THIS GODLIKE KEN DOLL OF A PERSON (it makes zero genetic sense and is my favorite thing about this movie)

  • Seriously, who is this guy and where do I get one?
  • This actor was basically never in anything else which is a fucking CRIME because he is BEAUTIFUL and a WONDERFUL SINGER
  • Speaking of wonderful singers, Bernadette Peters is the step-mother. That’s right, Broadway superstar, Sondheim’s muse herself, Bernadette Peters. 
  • And for no other reason than being Bernadette Peters, she sings “Falling in Love with Love” which isn’t even from this fucking musical (though it is R&H’s) and dramatically swoons onto couches
  • She also has one white daughter and one black daughter and they are both terrible and perfect
  • What even is the wallpaper in this movie? Seriously, pay attention to the wallpaper. 
  • And the costumes in the movie. Especially during the ball when the dresses all go swoosh! 

Originally posted by kaleidoscopekingdoms


  • Inexplicably, George Costanza is the prince’s servant and has a completely random and bizarre accent. 
  • “I wish there was something between us: a continent” is the greatest rejection line ever
  • This movie is genuinely funny at times. All the actors are too good to get bogged down by cheesy dialogue 
  • Ugh, that scene in the garden. I s2g, this was the most romantic thing to me when I was 8 

Originally posted by kaleidoscopekingdoms


  • Seriously, this prince is the dreamiest prince you’ve ever seen 
  • Oh man, the special effects are so bad
  • Whitney Houston singing and floating away into the aether is maybe my favorite film ending of all time

IN CONCLUSION: WATCH THIS FUCKING MOVIE. IT IS A FUCKING DELIGHT.

questions to get to know people well
  • 1: it's the apocalypse. you lay next to the person you trust and love most, and start talking. you know your time is limited. what is the one thing you want them to know before you two die?
  • 2: you are faced with an almighty spirit. it tells you that you must choose two emotions\feelings - one of them you will never feel again, and the other becomes your most dominant. which two are those?
  • 3: what is the one thing you want your best friend to never do? why? how will you react if they do it?
  • 4: do you have a favorite tv show? why is it your favorite? what is the reason you started watching it, and what is the reason you continued?
  • 5: do you have a favorite musical instrument? if yes, why exactly is it your favorite? can you play it/would you ever?
  • 6: who is your all-time favorite character? why exactly? do you relate to them, and how?
  • 7: is there anything you believe in? what is it? why do you believe in it? can you tell us something that explains this belief?
  • 8: you are locked in a room until the day you die, and have a choice to spend this time with one person. will you choose someone? if yes, who is it? why?
  • 9: what is the book that got you into reading, if there even is one? what was so special about it? when did you read it?
  • 10: what is the song i have to listen to so i could know you better?
  • 11: do you prefer being outside when its sunny or when its dark?
  • 12: do you like the rain? why? do you prefer storms or light dripping?
  • 13: hot chocolate with cinnamon, marshmellows, both or none?
  • 14: do you like tea? why? if yes, what is your favorite kind?
  • 15: do you enjoy coffee? if yes, do you drink it for the taste or for the caffeine?
  • 16: what is your perfect playlist for studying? where is the perfect place to listen to it?
  • 17: what is your favorite color? why? what is your least favorite shade of this color?
  • 18: think of a person you love. now describe them, using only stuff that only you would describe them with. (for example - my person would be described by reading a new book while there's a storm outside.)
  • 19: what is the song you feel like you HAVE to know to play?
  • 20: do you like writing? do you prefer to write on a computer or in a notebook?
  • 21: shuffle your playlist until you get to a song you will never skip. what is this song? why do you never skip it? do you recommend it?
  • 22: do you like stargazing? why?
  • 23: what is your favorite hour of the day?
  • 24: what is your harry potter house? did you get sorted on pottermore or do you think it represents you better?
  • 25: what is your patronus?
  • 26: do you want to write a book? if yes, did you start already?
  • 27: what is your favorite smell?
  • 28: picture yourself at ease. now describe what exactly did you picture - with who you are? where? what exactly put you at ease?
  • 29: you have the option to forget one book/series completly and reread/rewatch it from the start. what book/series is it?
  • 30: what do you love most about humanity?
Improve your pixel art sprites!

Introduction

In this tutorial, I will explain you how to use a couple techniques I used to improve Planet Centauri’s sprites before implementing them into the game (or before animating them).
Some of the rules shown here are very easy to use, and/or are purely  methodical;
so even if you aren’t very skilled, follow those simple guidelines to make your sprites cleaner.


Colors

A lot of basic mistakes will ruin the quality of your art.
Thankfully, they’re also generally quite easy to fix with some experience, and
by paying attention.


Too many colors

Pixel art is all about constraints. When two colors are very close, merge them into an intermediate one, so you see if it improves the result.
Using a small palette will help you improving your skills much more easily, and will make creating sprites also easier.
It also will make it easier to identify unwanted artifacts (i.e. misplaced pixels).


Gradients

If you are constructing a palette with gradients, avoid at any cost independent gradients (i.e. only dimmed/lighted base colors). Use gradients that depends on each other.

You can also try to use yellow-ish or cyan-ish saturated light colors, and blue-ish and purple-ish desaturated dark colors. However, avoid using an over-saturated or an under-saturated palette.
This usually ends up bad and breaks contrasts.
You should also use gradients with outspread tints to avoid washy color contrasts.

Remember never to use more colors than necessary, and use gradients with contrasted brightness.
Feel free to try using other generic palettes on your sprite to compare it with your palette so you can improve it.


Neighbor colors

Avoid as much as you can excessive contrasts between neighboring pixels.
For example, a black line over a white background usually won’t look natural.
A line that fits the background color well gives a realistic volume effect.

This is as true for outlines, which has to fit with both the inner color and the umbrage of the surface.

NB: Obviously, this doesn’t work with any graphic style.


Pillow shading

Pillow shading is a nasty effect that occurs when the light source comes from the front.

Avoid pillow shading, unless you really know what you’re doing.


Lines and curves

Perfect line: A line that has a constant vertical and horizontal step.

Perfect curve: A curve made of perfect lines which step always depends on the other parts of the curve.

Dirty line: A line that has at least one sub-segment with more than one adjacent pixel on one end.

As you may have noticed on the pictures above, dirty lines should be avoided.
You should use as much perfect lines and curves as possible.


Clusters

A cluster is a group, a pack of connected pixels with the same color.
Cluster shapes will greatly affect the final image.
Bony and crude clusters will give a sketchy aspect.
Round and straight lines are preferred so you get a precise, smooth and nice image.

Avoid lonely pixels. If one pixel is inside of a different color cluster without
any adjacent pixel with the same color, remove it.


Dithering et texturing

Contrary to popular belief, dithering isn’t as great as it seems. A lot of dithering between heavily contrasted colors will often give a dirty and noisy image.
It is also a very bad idea to use dithering when animating a sprite, because keeping coherent dithering will be awfully hard.

If you art style lets you do it, use texturing instead (the difference is that texturing does not induce color limitations).
But don’t forget, texturing means harder animation and worse clarity.
Again, it’s a matter of style.
If you want a cartoon-ish look, do not use dithering nor texturing.


Antialiasing

Antialiasing a technique that reduces the staircase effect (aliasing) which is clearly visible on two lines between two contrasted surfaces.

Internal AA

There are two use-cases for internal AA :
Simply separating two surfaces, and using lines or curves cutting through two different surfaces.

In the first case, you may just need to insert an intermediate color where aliasing is visible to reduce it (generally, when the curve abruptly changes).

In the second case, you may just need to add a small intermediate color cluster between every horizontal or vertical sub-segment.
Its size directly depends on the sub-segment size.


External AA

External AA suffers from an important restriction, unlike internal AA: The background color in a game will constantly change, so you need to have an effect that looks good on both dark and light backgrounds.

This rule is quite easy: You only apply the effect inside of the sprite.
The end of an outline that neighbors with the background should never be modified.

In this image, the internal AA effect applied on the outer part of the sprite unveils some nasty artifacts, while external AA, even if it isn’t as efficient, gives a great effect on any background type.


The end.

Why McHanzo is A Thing: Explained from an animator’s perspective

Just to start, we have to note the Red Oni Blue Oni trope

Below, I’ve quoted the first few lines of each character type directly from TVTropes

The Red Oni is associated with passion, wildness, and defiance. A Red Oni character is often more brawny than brainy, extroverted, enthusiastic, determined, and filled with a zest for life. They are also much more likely to break conventions and rules than their counterpart. Often an Idiot Hero or, in more mature pieces, a Boisterous Bruiser.

The Blue Oni is associated with serenity, control and observing authority. A Blue Oni is more intellectual, proud, traditional, introverted, and cultured (sometimes more spiritual, although that’s not guaranteed). Blue Oni personalities are often respected by others, but also likely to puzzle or confound their peers because they are difficult to read and have a mysterious quality to them. Personality subtypes include The Stoic, The Quiet One, and Aloof Big Brother.

Canonically we know Mccree to be wild and defiant. Fanon Mccree often fills the role of “idiot hero”, at least on the surface, and is certainly more boisterous than the severe dutiful Hanzo. Canonically we know Mccree to be more of the rough cowboy type while still being charming and amiable based on his voice lines in game. Canonically we know Mccree has had a shady past and is therefore known for breaking conventions, cast in the role of outlaw. 

Canonically  we know Hanzo to favor serenity and control. He observed authority to a fault in his youth, he’s very traditional, spiritual, stoic on the surface, and he’s literally the aloof big brother compared to he more charming, cheerful Mccree and to the irresponsible flighty Genji. Fanon Hanzo is much closer to canon Hanzo in most cases simply because we have less to go on with Mccree, apart from his comic.

Their color schemes are also, from an animator and artist’s point of view, made to match on a visual level, with Mccree’s Red and warm browns a perfect contrast to Hanzo’s Blue and cold blacks. 

source

When it comes right down to it, color and surface personality plays a big part in how people just immediately find appeal in Hanzo and Mccree being together. It communicates to a very lizard brain level that these two are meant to go together, the Red Oni Blue Oni, Wild Red Westerner and Stoic Blue Easterner being perfect contrasts and therefore perfect foils to one another. 

There are many examples of this in media, largely in Western media, especially in Western animation, though there are examples of it seen in other media as well. It’s a visual cue that represents contrast as well as personality, not strictly as a romance, but very much as an indication that “these two go together and/or oppose each other’

From that alone it’s not difficult to figure out how charming amiable cowboy Mccree and stoic traditional archer Hanzo were put together despite limited interactions in canon

I’ve already covered the Reasons Why McHanzo is a Popular Ship in a separate post but I wanted to point out from a surface level standpoint why it is so easy to ship them even without too much known about their backstory and canon interactions

Their designs, both visually and in surface personality, almost demand they be put side by side 

Something I really appreciate about the new BATB film is that the costumes managed to (1) pay perfect homage to the original color tones and styles as seen in the animation and yet (2) carry symbolic changes and account for characters’ personalities, while also (3) being period appropriate. Like, wow. Major kudos to the costume designer and associated staff on this one.  

For example, let’s just talk about Beast/Prince wardrobe, which I find really interesting and beautiful. BATB begins with a dance, and the Prince is in this very dark, regal yet kind of gaudy clothing, standing out from the sea of women in white. (He’s also wearing a makeup mask, which is just another awesome layer of symbolism and era-appropriateness that I will not go into right now.) 

Throughout the film, Beast’s clothes get progressively lighter: from dark, torn rags (like he’s a criminal, a prisoner in his own palace) to the iconic lighter blue suit at the dance…to the moment Belle declares her love and they’re both dressed in all white (in this case, a symbol of purity and absolution)…to the very end, where the Prince wears blue again, but this time it’s the lightest shade of blue we see him wear. This change also reminds me of the trailer, where the word “Beast” in the title grows lighter as it gets closer to the word “Belle”. Beast’s subtle clothing changes represent the changes in his disposition and character. His wardrobe follows the path of the curse, from its inception to completion, as the castle goes from dark to light, from winter to spring, from death to life. 

The two other dance scenes are also important. 

When Belle and Beast dance together for the first time, Belle is the one who stands out in that stunning yellow dress. When Beast lets her go, her yellow dress positively pops in an otherwise monochrome, snow-covered forest, like a beacon in the night. And as he watches her go, he returns to rags, representing his hope leaving him behind.

In contrast, when Belle and the Prince dance together at the end, they both stand apart from the crowd but for different reasons than before. Unlike their first dance, this time the Prince is the one who shines the most in an otherwise temperate crowd, which parallels the opening dance scene. Unmasked, the Prince is in a light blue and white suit, the opposite of how he dressed before; and yet, this ending suit almost matches how Belle was dressed at the beginning of the movie, in her classic blue and white dress. Meanwhile, although at first glance Belle’s mostly white dress at the end might make her appear like just another girl in the crowd, she really stands out due to the roses on her dress, like a physical manifestation of spring coming back to the castle and the curse being lifted. 

Dear young artists

Here are things I wish that someone told me when I started posting/doing art:

1: I know it sucks but you won’t get your art noticed right away. So be patient and enjoy sharing your art even if it seems no one is looking.

2: Do not take request that you know will take you more than 30 minutes. If it takes longer, that’s what commissions are for. Often people will abuse that you are an artist taking request and will give very elaborate requests.

3: Speaking of commissions, do not price ANYTHING under $5. Please value your art. I promise you the people that will complain the “it’s over priced” are cheap. If they actually want your art, they would pay for it as is.

4: SAVE SAVE SAVE. If you do digital art, save it at least every 15 minutes. Save every piece of art, don’t throw it away or delete it.

5: DATE YOUR ART. At the end of last year is when I actually started dating my art within the file name. Example: “6-13-Girl” and have a folder for each year. This would save time when you’re trying to remember when you did an old piece of art or are creating a portfolio.

6: For the love of god, you don’t have to finish everything. Do practice sketches without them turning into elaborate hours of work.

7: Continuing from 6, YOUR SKETCHBOOK IS A SKETCHBOOK FOR A REASON. That’s where you practice. Don’t worry about a drawing not being perfect, the book is for practicing.

8: You don’t have to show someone your sketchbook if you don’t want to. Just say, “I’d rather you not, it’s very personal” and leave it at that.

9: Post your practices and ask for feedback. P.S. take “you need to work on ______ but good color choice!” as feedback and “your art sucks” as someone being an ass.

10: Don’t trace references or others artwork. It will literally not help you in the long run. A good example of how to use a ref is sketch the basic shape and add details as you go.

11: Don’t tighten you hand when you draw or aka don’t carve into the paper. Keep your strokes light when doing the basic shapes then add to darken the lines when you like them. This will save frustration of it not being able to erase.

12: WATCH SPEEDPAINTS. Slow them down if needed and learn from other artists and take the techniques you like from it. This especially works for visual learners.

13: Try tutorials even if you don’t like the style. You won’t know you like doing something unless you try it, that’s how people improve their art as well.

14: If you look through my blog, you can see that I do A LOT of redraws. I find them important to do sometimes to see your progress and show you what you need to work on.

15: Most importantly: Remember that your favorite artists, no matter their age, have been working on their drawing skills for years. It’s taken me 6 years to get my art where I like it and I’m still improving like everyone else.


Any other artists that would like to add or correct, feel free!

Writing an immersive third person limited point of view.

What is third person? In third person pov the narrator refers to all character by third-person pronouns, such as he, she, or they. In contrast, first person pov uses the first person pronouns, I and me, for the narrator.

What is third person limited? Third person limited is the alternate to third person omniscient. In third person limited, you have one single pov character narrating the story at any given moment (though you can have as many of these limited pov characters as you want throughout the course of the story), whereas in third person omniscient, there is an omniscient (all knowing) narrator.

Why choose a limited third person pov? 

- The reader forms a stronger, more personal connection to your pov character(s).
- You can easily build suspense because the reader never knows for certain what the non-pov characters are thinking, feeling, or planning.
- You can more easily write an unreliable narrator because your narrator tells things only as they see them, and not as they truly are.

At the end of the day, there is nothing you can’t do with limited if you’re creative and willing to think outside the box. 

So you want to write a good limited third person pov then?

Keep in mind that most of these tips also translate to first person pov. In many ways, third person limited is very similar to first person, because you have a single narrator at any given time, and the reader is confined to that narrator’s interpretation of the world.

Here are some key things you need to remember while writing limited third person: 

Keep reading

How’re Ur Roots?

- Succulent Edition -

A few weeks ago someone asked me to post some pictures of healthy vs. unhealthy roots. I assume they meant succulents so that’s what I’ll be covering today! My mom recently got a really cute hanging succulent planter, but OF COURSE the damn thing was an overcrowded, peat moss hell. But it was PERFECT to photograph for this post…

^ Let’s start with some dehydrated roots. You can see that they’re completely wizened. They’re usually a dull brown or greyish-brown color. They are dry and sometimes crunchy to the touch. These roots here are completely dead, and incapable of taking up water. At this point, I had no choice but to cut off the entire root ball and start over again.

^ Here’s an example of the direct opposite: overwatered roots. Note how limp and squishy this big ol’ root is. It’s mostly a sickly brown, but in some spots is turning dark with the beginnings of rot. Advanced rot due to overwatering will turn roots black, gooey, and will sometimes have a bad odor. This particular plant was rescued before all of its roots were affected. In this case, I was able to simply cut away the two or three mushy roots. If ALL roots were squishy, I would have AGAIN had to cut off the entire root ball and start over.

^ Here we have an ADORABLE baby nubbin. A new, healthy root will be firm and white, with a touch of green or pink. You should be able to bend them gently and they’re usually lightly moist.

^ Remember the first photo of dehydrated roots? This is the same kind of plant with some healthy roots. Note the arrow pointing at the nice, fresh white. This is helpful in judging whether or not mostly dry roots are still capable of taking up water. If you can spot any white, those roots are okay. I ended up leaving about 50% of the roots on this guy.

BONUS! Some examples of different types of roots. The outside two are echeveria and the center is a pachyveria. These needed very little trimming – as you can see, plenty of robust, white roots.

I hope this was helpful! <3

YAMAZAKI is the perfect example of what it means to be a true artist. Amazing visuals, pure talent, flawless production value…I could go on and on. The video had fantastic camera work, vivid imagery and color, just the right amount of gore and roughness while still maintaining a sexy and fun setting. The beat was incredible and the timing and the switch ups were perfect, the whole experience was unique especially for a genre like K-pop (considering that Yongguk is known more for his music as a K-pop idol although his previous underground works are hip-hop based). What more could you ask for from a mixtape, especially a mixtape from a member of B.A.P aka a group notorious for perfection in all musical aspects?

I’ve was thinking...

So you know how in the original American release of Persona 1, they changed the character’s designs to seem more American and sell more copies? Except making them more American mostly entailed just changing their hair colors and names? (And also making one of them black.)

For example:


(Original versions on the left, American versions on the right)


They changed “Masao” to “Mark”, “Kei Nanjo” to “Nate Trinity”, “Eriko” to “Ellen” and so forth.

But this makes me think…

We should continue this obviously perfect trend in the more modern Persona games as well!

So I present to you all:

Revelations: Persona 5!

With hip new American characters such as:

Alex Kent: The Protagonist!

Rick Simpson!

Joshua King!

Gabriel Arnold!

Hayley Owens!

Marie Nicholls!

Francis Scott!

And last but not least…

Ann Ta–hey wait a second…

Anyway, hype yourselves for the North American release of Revelations: Persona 5!

It’ll be EXTRA American!

obsessive-nymph  asked:

Hey there!! I just want to say that i LOVE your blog, it's so interesting and funny and magical and colorful and just, the perfect blog about Kuroshitsuji that i know~ 😇💕 Ok, so my question is that if you think that Lizzy was suspicious about Our!Ciel's true identity before the whole thing with Bravat started? Cause' i just re-read chapter 66 and on the 8th page seems like Lizzy had a moment of realization or maybe shock because of Our!Ciel's "idk what u talkin' about" face, but idk 😦

Thanks! :D

Yes, many people wonder why Lizzy didn’t notice anything and become suspicious of our Ciel until recently, but like you said, she did notice and she was suspicious!! For example, she noticed that the “Ciel” who returned from captivity was smaller than her, she also noticed that he didn’t call her “Lizzy” like he used to do (ch58).

She noticed that Ciel was coughing in Campania arc (ch56).

She also noticed in the Easter chapter that our Ciel didn’t remember certain events from their childhood .

She noticed all these little oddities and that’s why she eventually tested our Ciel by lying to him about the Easter eggs 

and our Ciel didn’t realise it was a lie and fell for it.

And this occurrence reinforced Lizzy’s doubts

and caused her a lot of distress…

of which Blavat then took advantage in the current arc :/

So yeah, what we really need is a flashback from her POV where we can see what she was truly thinking in those scenes.

a mini masterpost (if you will) to thank you for 150 followers!! [edit: at the time of posting i have 191 followers omg!!] y’all are the sweetest :) also, thank you for the request @glitteratti !! 

01. handwriting (at least for me) makes or breaks a spread

i’ve always found that if my handwriting looks nice and neat, i like the spread so much better regardless of whether it matches/has a theme/whatever. i would say take the most amount of time on your handwriting and maybe you’ll feel more proud of the spread?? idk that’s what works for me lol!

02. don’t worry about making sure you have a theme

ok real talk my bujo spreads literally never have a theme everything is always a riot of color and i just paste/tape/glue/write whatever i feel like into the margins on the sides. i think there seems to be pressure to make sure your spread is super color coded with perfect brush lettering and washi tape that perfectly matches your ink color and tbh those are nice and if that’s ya thing great!! but to me they’ve always seemed unattainable and i never strive for that

03. fill it with what you like!! do what you’re feelin’

it’s your bullet journal. no one else can or should tell you how to create it as it is a representation of yourself (and i’m not trying to do that in this post i’m just offering what works for me!! what works for another studyblr will be completely different). example: i’ve been really into star trek the past few weeks and consequently, my spreads have been full of star trek lmao because right now it’s making me happy!! plus i’ll love to look back one day and remember this feeling and to me my bullet journal is like a low maintenance diary bc u can literally do anything you want with it 

04. don’t be afraid to break your own traditions

i remember thinking at the beginning of my bujo journey that everything had to be perfect and each month i had to create my habit tracker exactly the same and doing one thing differently would stress me out and like,, no! my main advice is do whatever you’re feeling and don’t compare it to others in the community (and i know people have some amazing bullet journals so it’s hard not to compare) but in the end what’s right for them may not be right for u!!

05. update it every night before you go to bed!!

because the request was about remembering to keep it up! tbh i don’t do this as often as i should but one of my daily habit tracker things is “prepared for the next day” and i only check this off if, at the end of the day, my bujo is updated and ready, my lunch is made, my clothes are laid out, and i’m prepared for the day ahead of me and the only reason i ever am prepared is because i’m so vain that i want to fill in all the little circles and cross every item on my list and tbh trying to keep everything organized and neat and that satisfaction of being able to cross something off my to do list is the only reason my bujo functions for me lmao (if anyone is interested my other habit tracker categories are productive (which i only check off if i finished all my to dos), play with my dogs, and duolingo!)

06. when designing your spreads, don’t have a reference image open!

imo this messes with my creativity. if i try to copy someone else’s spread i get frustrated and i always feel like it looks really bad compared to theirs (which is a bad mentality anyway bc u should never compare your work, least of all your creative expression, to another’s like this). however, to clarify, i think taking inspiration from people is a great thing!! i love to look at other people’s bujos and try to incorporate things they’ve done but i don’t think it’s respectful or helpful to copy someone’s style exactly. (also if anyone is interested i could make a lil post about people with great bullet journals?? or maybe i could do bullet journal compliments???? does anyone want this lol i’m just typing as i’m thinking but lmk if i should do bujo compliments!!) also @studyrose ‘s bullet journal is probably my favorite hers are always beautiful and i get a lot of my ideas from her so u should check it out :)

07. maybe make an aesthetics tag?

i have a tag #aesthetic (feel free to check it out!!) of images i reblog (mostly art and photography) that i can look back thru and print out to glue into my bullet journal! it’s super helpful when i don’t have any magazines to clip. i also have an #art tag on my fandom sideblogs (i’m such a nerd i can’t believe i have more than one lamoamo) and i frequently print fanart from them as well!! (just make sure to credit the artist if u post a pic involving their art i used to not do this but then i realized how disrespectful it is so i make sure to tag the artist now lol)

08. it’s okay to take a break from bullet journaling, especially if it’s becoming more of a hindrance than a help. it’s meant to help you organize your life and if it becomes more of a hassle than it’s worth, just take a break. reset. come back for the next monthly spread better than ever.

i have done this many times in the past and you don’t owe an explanation to anyone. it’s meant for you.

hope y’all enjoyed this!! again, lmk (shoot me an ask/message me/talk to me!!) if anyone would be interested in bujo compliments :) thank u for being amazing if you’re reading this i love u!!

xoxo sarah

You Don’t Have To Change - Harry Hook x Reader

A/N I’ve been really inspired lately to write a bit more. I’m so thankful to hear some of your guys feedback on my last imagine and I thought why not make another one. Enjoy xoxo

Summary:You are the sister of King Ben and you have developed a crush on Harry Hook. You try so hard to become a Villain and ask the 4 VK to help you.


Harry’s POV

“I’m too dangerous for you lass” I spoke to Y/N we had been partnered up in chemistry class together “I can basically read your mind Y/N you don’t deserve me you deserve good and I’m evil.” “I don’t play by the rules Harry I know what evil is and I can be that for you.” Y/N flirted back attempting to be bad. I laughed as I smirked up at her “Y/N deary you have no idea what evil is.”

She’s suppose to marry royalty no matter what I cannot let her find out that I have been in love with her since the day I laid my eyes on her. She deserves good not evil.

Originally posted by trippsykes

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TATTOO STYLES

Tattoos are an art form. And to me, art is creativity. So no list will ever be complete, until there will be someone out there working on something new. But this (a rewriting of an old piece I wrote for ET on tumblr) can help to know a little bit more about modern tattoo styles. Take your time to understand the differencies, go through the names in the list, find your style. A good tattoo lasts forever, and knowledge is the roots of a good choice.

Old School/Traditional: Is usually referred to American classic tattooing. Artists like Amund Dietzel, Sailor Jerry, Herbert Hoffman or Bert Grimm, from the firtst decades of 1900, are the names to start from if you want to know its roots, Classical subjects (anchors, ships, roses, daggers, eagles, horses etc.), simple designs, bold lines and  basic color palettes. Traditional tattooing is definitely more than a trend, with its own philosophy and unwritten rules.

Tony Nilsson, Cassandra Frances, Samuele Briganti, Paul Dobleman, Paul Fulton, Florian Santus, Moira Ramone (pics: Moira Ramone, Paul Fulton, Mauro Quaresima)

There is also a different kind of traditional, widly diffused, enough to be considered a style, that people keep considering part of traditional or neo traditional. It keeps bold lines, and part of the classic imaginery, mixed with weird, modern, surreal, pop stuff. No limits for color palettes, no rules. Tradition meets creativity, one of the personal favourites.

El Carlo, Ron Wells, Luca Font, Pietro Sedda, Ray Wallace, Dane Mancini, Laura Yahna, Ibi Rothe, Deno Jr (pics: Ray Wallace, El Carlo, Laura Yahna, Dane Mancini)

Japanese: Originally called Irezumi, its roots runs deep in the history of its country. Its meaning in Japanese culture changed through the centuries, from tebori (tattooing by hand) to Yobori (tattooing by machine), to became part of the classic Japanese imaginaery, as we know it. Not every asian themed tattoo (common subjects like dragons, yokai demons, tigers, hannya masks and so on) is japanese style. Everything from colors to placement, to the shapes of the untattooed areas has its rules. As any other ancient styles, of course, you can find its modern, contaminated, version too (Gakkin or Wendy Pham’s works are a good example).  

Shige, Pino Cafaro, Caio Pinero, Bill Canales, Gotch, Rodrigo Souto, Yutaro (Bill Canales, Pino Cafaro, R. Souto, Shigenori Ywasaki)

Modern tribal and ornamental: usually referred to a mix of geometrical shapes, patterns, mandalas, asian motives, and Maori influences.

Guy le tatooer, Thomas Hooper, Marco Galdo, Chaim Machlev, Little Swastika (Guy, C. Machlev, T. Hooper)

Realism: From portraits, to a custom piece, to the perfect reproduction of a picture/painting. Realistic tattoos is one of the most spectacular styles in tattooing. No black outline, and lifelike shades, black and grey or colors. It easily mixes with different styles, like with Simone Pfaff or Andrey Lukovnikov, where realism is just a technical part of their own style.

Robert Hernandez, Chris Gherman, Alex De Pase, Scrappy Uno, Sandra Daukshta, Lippo, Sam Stokes (Lippo, A. Acosta, S. Daukshta)

Biomechanical: A trend in the late 90’, basically made of mechanical parts that looks like fused with the flesh. Organic and unorganic elements are realistically drawn, to create the illusion to be carved in the onwer’s body.

Don McDonald, Carson Hill, Guy Hatchinson (who creates bio organic style) (itp: Carson Hill, Don McDonald, Guy Atchinson)

New School/Cartoonish: Fantasy, big eyes subjects, rounded shapes, bright colors, crazy proportions and prospectives. Another style that was more popular in the 90’, now is often fused with different styles, specially with neo traditional.

Kati Berinkey (she fuses new school and sketchy/illustrative styles for her designs), Adam Hawtorne (another one with his own distintcive illustrative style), David Tevenal, Nathan Evans (mixing neo trad e new school) (A. Hawtorne, A. H., David Tevenal)

Neo Traditional: Illustrative like tattoos, where classical subjects like women, crows, snakes, triangles, wolves etc. (from the classic old school imaginery), are drawn with bright colors, and realistical shading, in a aperfect mix between traditional and realism.

Emily Rose, Dusty Neal, Lu’s Lips, Christophe Bonardi, Debora Cherrys, Rodrigo Kalaka El Uf, Jack Goks Pearce. (E. R. Murray, R. Kalaka, Teresa Sharpe, Lu’s Lips)

Lettering: Text tattoos are usually a bad idea, unless they are done in the proper style, and from a specialized artist.

Norm Will Rise, Justin Wilson, Big Meas (N. W. R., J. Wilson, Big Meas)

Chicano: the word “Chicano”, referred to American citizen of Mexican origin, ceased to be a slur in the 60’, while the style itself was born a couple decades before. Common subjects are wemen, skulls, roses, and religious icons, usually in black and gray.

Boog, Macko (Macko, Boog)

These are the most common, radicated, worldly reconized style. But is just a partial view of what the contemporary tattoo scene can offer. In the last 15 years, more and more styles are born. Some of them still don’t even have a name, some have more than one. Some of them will became classic and some are just a trend.

Fun fact: wikipidia’s italian “tattoo” page have “genital” listed as one of the most common styles.

Watercolors: The colors are spread to simulate watercolors. Often mixed with other styles. People keeps debating about how watercolor tattoos will age. Only time will tell.

Klaim, Amanda Wachob, Niko Inko (A. Wachob, G. Smash, Klaim)

Photoshop: the names probably comes from a folder where the artist Xoil (still one of the best in this style) used to store his works’ pics.

If you have ever used PS, you know what I’m talking about. PS style is basically a collage of different images and techniques, from watercolor to dotwork to lettering.

Xoil, Niko Inko, Voller Kontrast, Little Swastika, Jef Palumbo, Arlin ffrench (J. Palumbo, Xoil)

Illustrative Geometrical style: geometrical elements are common in modern tattoo designs, but some artists  generated a new trend, mixing illustrative elements, modern tribal patterns, and geometrical lines.

Maxime Buchi, Daniel Meyer, Valentin Hirsch, Kamil Czapiga  (C. Machlev, D. Meyer, Maxime Buchi) 

Illustrative, sketchy: The artist draw on skin all the lines that usually are ereased in a finished design, to create the illusion of a pencil sketch.

Lea Nahon, Sam Rulz, Nomi Chi, Sven Groenvald (Lea Nahon, S. Groenvald, Nomi Chi)

3D: Again, not exactly a style.  The artist uses realistic shading, shadows and prospectives to give the illusion of depth.

Russ Abbott, Jesse Rix (itp: Jesse Rix, Russ Abbott)

Engraving: on a thin line between illustrative, sketchy, and traditional tattoos, engraving uses black lines to simulate ancient wood engraving techniques, taking inspiration from medieval like illustration.

Sam Rulz, Maxime Buchi, Andrei Svetov (A. SV, Sam Rulz)

Next style has no name yet, and it’s slightly less diffused.. But I like it, so it’s in the list. ;) Tipical traditional pieces but coloured with flat colors, almost no shades, and twisted, experimental, original designs. 

Adrian Edek, Sany Kim, Aivaras Lee, Patryk Hilton

Girly: It’s a definition I hate, cause I’m convinced there is no room for sex differencies in art. I’m a big bearded boy and still I would proudly wear a Jody Dawber or Cassandra Frances’ piece. Still, this is how people call it. Bold lines and flat shading are mixed with bright colors like pink, yellow, light blue, that perfectly fits the “cuteness” of the subjects, often inspired from pop culture and cartoon characters.

Jody Dawber (basically a traditional artist), Alex Strangler, Sasha Mezoghlian (A. Strangler, J. Dawber, S. Mezoghlian)

The last style of this list have no name yet, but it’s still worth to be considered cause of it’s diffusion and people response to it. Basically the artists recreates a simpler, geometrical, version of the subjects, with no black outline, and a watercolor effect.

Sasha Unisex, Marius Trubisz, Marcin Surowiec, David Cote (M. Surowiec, Sasha Unisex)

amajordoseofinsanity  asked:

I always run into the problem as a liberal that those who I most want to help are always the fuel to the problems we face. For example: poor white people, they are without a doubt one of the biggest drivers behind extremely xenophobic, nationalism, and authoritarianism. I think the left has to grow a spine and actually address these people directly or else the right will continue to us them as it always has.

Yeah, this goes back to the Southern Strategy perfected by Lee Atwater and Nixon: convince the poorest white person that they are still superior to, or better off than a person of color, and they’ll ignore the rich who are making their lives worse, to ensure that the person of color never has it as good as they do.

wolfbro92  asked:

Hello, I am trying to avoid falling into the pit fall that is trying to write a female character who is very in control of her sexuality and also dresses in fairley reveling way, without objectifing her. She dresses like she does because she wants it to be very clear to every one around her that it is not a matter of whether not she could punt you through a wall but rather how far you would go after that. and she is well out of the 'confused' period of her life, and into the 'proud to be me' .

Hello!  For the purposes of this response, I’m going to assume you’re a (heterosexual?) male author, in which the first step I’d recommend for writing about this is to consult as many women as possible about it.  Seeing as I am a women, I’d say you’re ahead of the game in this department.  

Next, here are some personal tips and rules of thumb for writing about sexual female characters without sexualizing them:

1.  Treat them as people.  

Regardless of how promiscuous, attractive, and sexual your character is, she will have defining traits beyond that.  Focus on your character’s personality before you describe her appearance.  Spend some time working out her idiosyncrasies, quirks, likes and dislikes, that don’t involve sex.  Make sure she’s a well-rounded character before you even think about focusing on her sexuality;  her appearance should be an afterthought, not a defining feature.  

This goes for characters of all genders:  regardless of how stunningly attractive they’re emphasized to be, regardless of the author’s relentless descriptions of their “rock hard abs” or “ample breasts,” the characters I find most attractive are invariably the ones with a strong and well-defined personality.  

Basically, regardless of how sexy your character is, she is, first and foremost, a person, with a fully developed personality.  Remember that, and you’ll be several steps ahead of your fellow male authors.

2.  Make sure she’s dressed practically and appropriately.   

Revealing clothes are great.  I’ll show cleavage like nobody’s business.  But don’t fall into the false empowerment purgatory of ridiculously revealing clothes that are neither appropriate to the situation nor practical for what your character is doing.  

For instance, if your character is kicking ass and taking names, she should not be doing it like this:

If your character is setting out for a fight, avoid gratuitous cleavage, showing too much skin, and basically anything that looks like it could just as easily be exhibited in a Victoria’s Secret ad.  

Some more practical options for your female characters include full-body spandex (like male superheroes have been wearing since spandex was invented), cargo pants and tank tops, and athletic-wear.  I also personally enjoy basically any character in full-body latex or leather, and it’s totally not because its a personal kink of mine.

In a quiet, controlled, dress up-y setting, your character can wear the revealing clothes she prefers, but there are some basic guidelines for this as well:      

3.  Stay away from gratuitously focusing on breasts. 

“My full breasts swelled invitingly over the lacy rim of my sports bra.”  “Her small breasts swung loosely beneath her poncho.”  “She purred as she contentedly patted her young breasts dry.”

So many male writers do this, and it never fails to grate on me.  Even if your character is wearing the most cleavage-bearing, Jessica Rabbit-esque getup imaginable, she will not be thinking about her boobs 24/7, especially if it’s told in the first person. 

The only time I’m actively thinking about my breasts is when I’m thinking about how much they’re fucking annoying me.  Right now, for example, I’m thinking about them because all my bras are in the wash and the only one available was one of my mom’s sports bras, and it feels like a goddamn binder.  

Do I love them?  Am I happy to have them?  Yes, but sometimes they fucking suck, man.  

On that note, however, the feeling of taking off a bra is heavenly, and I do occasionally like putting my hands on them for no particular reason.  

If you want to emphasize that your character is physically beautiful, and she’s wearing revealing clothing, here are a few body parts that I wish authors would pay more attention to: 

“The lean, well-defined muscles of her back rippled like liquid.”  

“The slit up the side of her evening gown showed off a smooth expanse of thigh.”  

“Her hair was braided to one side, calling attention to her slender neck and sharp jawline and showing off her toned shoulders.”     

This might be the queer gal in me talking, but I’d say that’s a definite improvement.

4.  Allow her to have physical flaws.

“Her lovely sloping waist gave way to voluptuous hips, perfectly mirroring the ample roundness of her bosoms.  Luscious locks of silky blond hair framed her heart-shaped face and high cheekbones, accentuating lush lips and a petite button nose, large eyes framed with lush lashes.”  

This is a condensed version of the descriptions I’ve read.  Authors, particularly male authors, will take up entire pages describing flawlessly beautiful female characters that probably couldn’t exist outside of a magazine.  

Don’t do this.  Even if your character is stunningly gorgeous, it’s her physical idiosyncrasies that will make her memorable.  Give her a honking laugh, a birthmark, a scar, one crooked tooth that stands out in an otherwise perfect smile.

Moreover, as a general rule of thumb, stay away from cutesy descriptors “petite button noses,” “doe eyes,” “lush, long lashes,” “doll-like,” “porcelain skin,” and basically anything else that sounds as though you’re describing a children’s toy.  One or two characters can have these features, but when every female character sounds like a porcelain doll, it gets tiresome. 

Confession time:  I like to endow my male characters with these traits just to throw people.  A lot of my male main characters will be described as having large, doe-like eyes with long lashes, lush pink lips, delicate features, and/or basically everything else cute and “feminine” with which female characters are frequently endowed. 

I feel like it’s quietly subversive, because there’s a lot of pressure for male characters to constantly be masculine (if not, it’s usually presented as comedy relief), just as it’s customary for female characters to consistently be effortlessly cute, delicate, and feminine.  

Your female characters will not always be cute, delicate, and feminine.  Even the most gorgeous people in the world will occasionally wake up with static-y, bird’s nest hair and dark raccoon circles under their eyes.  They get body odor, they go to the bathroom, they get bad breath, they get unsightly rashes, have allergic reactions, get bug bites.  

Granted, you probably won’t need to describe that in gratuitous detail, but you need to realize that women aren’t goddesses.  If your character has perfect makeup, she’s put a lot of time and energy into learning how to do perfect makeup, applying it every morning, et cetera.  If she has a perfect body, she probably works out a lot, eats a steadily healthy diet, and/or has some pretty perfect genes.  Traditional femininity is hard work;  it isn’t simply a natural state of being for women and girls.

Basically, it all goes back to point one:  treat your female characters as people.   

5.  Be open to criticism.

This applies for writing all marginalized groups to which you don’t belong.  I can and do write characters of color, for example, but I need to be open to criticism from actual people of color for when I’m doing it wrong.  

If you’re straight (which I am not), you can and should write queer characters, but you need to be open to the critiques of actual queer people when they tell you how to improve.  

And you (and again, I’m only assuming you’re male here, as it isn’t specified) can and should write female characters, but you need to keep an open ear to real women if they say you aren’t doing it right.  

This isn’t personal, and it doesn’t mean you’re a bad person;  what a lot of people need to understand on this website (and the internet in general) is that we will never reach a state of total ideological purity, just as we will never understand the experience of groups to which we do not belong.

Accept it, commit to the journey of bettering yourself as a person and as a creator, and realize that criticism is not a personal insult to you;  it’s a means by which you can grow.


I really hope this helps!!

Cosmic Makeup Magick!

This would be perfect for all witches that often use colors for different aspects of their craft! Colors represent energies so this will be perfect for day to day harnessing of whatever cosmic/earth energies you desire! Feel free to put your own spin on this and use the basic concept! ★

For this particular version, you could use one or both of the BH cosmetics eyeshadow palettes: Supernova & Galaxy Chic

(If you don’t have these, no worries! Use any shimmery eyeshadows that you want!) 

💫 Choose shades that correspond with the energies you’re trying to harness and do any eye look that you desire! You could also choose shades according to their names - for example, to harness solar energies, you could use the shade Sun from Galaxy Chic with Leo from Supernova. 

💫 While you’re applying your makeup, think of your intentions for the day that you would like to infuse with the cosmic/earth energies that you’ve chosen within your colors. Put all of your personal energies into this - it will make the effect stronger! 

💫 Helpful tip: If your chosen shadows are baked, use them with a damp brush or finger for a more pigmented look - this will also enhance and enrich the energies you’re trying to attract.

💫 Finish up your magickally infused makeup and shine bright for the whole day! When you remove your makeup at the end of the day, thank the energies you chose! 

I hope you guys find this to be a fun and colorful way to harness energies all throughout the day - while looking like a cosmic badass at the same time! ★