things i found on google

STOP WITH WHAT YOU’RE DOING!!

AND LOOK AT THIS PICTURE OF BOB ROSS HOLDING A BABY RACCOON

you may continue with your day

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social media demigod style: Annabeth Chase.

穢(けが)れきった 頭の中 太陽になりたいのさ 優しくね なりたいの 本当は

My late contribution to the Oiran!Ivlis au.

More expressions below cuz yeah.

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Marital Signifiers

So I had a dream where two people from very different cultures have to get married to prevent a war, and in it, one culture used rings to signify marriage while the other used (pierced) earrings.

This got me thinking about what traditions exist to visually show that someone is married. So a bit of research later, some examples are:

  • Wearing a ring (left or right hand, depending on culture) on the “ring” finger (third finger), sometimes getting a tattoo on the appropriate finger (especially if the person’s job makes wearing an actual ring dangerous and/or impractical)
  • (For men) having a beard, or wearing a prayer shawl
  • (For women) wearing a special necklace, or special bangles, or special hair style/covering, or a sindoor

So that’s pretty cool, but I think there are lots of other ways people could show that they’re married. (And maybe there are cultures that do–they just weren’t among the ones I found in my 30 minutes of googling). Maybe things like:

  • Pierced ears/nose/lip
  • Specific colour of nail polish and/or tattoo on hands/fingers
  • Hair length (either unwed individuals must keep hair short, or unwed individuals are not allowed to cut their hair until after marriage)
  • Special type of clothing (a sash, shawl, belt, or scarf)
  • Specific colour of clothing (for example, maybe only married people can wear blue)
  • Less visual, but what if only married people could use certain scents (like lavender) for their soaps and/or fragrances?

There are lots of possibilities! So why not use something other than “exchanging rings” in your fantasy story? Just make sure you think about what that means for the culture. (For example, puzzle rings [which are super cool–I love the ‘woven’ look] were originally developed to catch wives who cheated on their husbands, because they fall apart when taken off. Which shows that women weren’t trusted, and that they weren’t expected to be very clever [otherwise they could put the ring back together])

Permanent markings (like tattoos and piercings) are likely used in a culture where divorces are either not common, or not allowed. Might make for an interesting exploration to look at how such a culture might handle widows/widowers, or those rare instances of divorce. (Do they have a different way to show widowhood vs divorce? How easy/hard is it for a divorcee to make it look like their widowed instead?)

For specific colours/items only available to married individuals, think about how easy it is for the poorest people in the society to access. Do they have to use alternatives to achieve the same visual representation of their marriage? (For example, if a sparkling teal nail polish is what denotes a married person, but it’s expensive, do poor use a fruit/flower that stains their fingertips instead? Maybe the polish is accessible to everyone, but then the rich are going to want some way to denote their wealth as well [comparable to massive engagement rings], so maybe they use a flat teal and then add the sparkle by placing tiny slivers of diamonds on the wet polish?)

And then you must think about the difference in how men and women (and other genders, if it’s a multi-gendered society) present their symbol of marriage. Even with a symbol like a ring that both men and women use, the rings are often very different in appearance. Men’s rings tend to be thicker and simpler, while women’s rings tend to be thinner and more “elegant” (swoops, swirls, curls, multiple gems, etc.). So in a society that uses nail polish or piercings to show marriage, how might it be worn by different genders?

so i found this picture in google while searching for something Umakoshi related

and i see a crossover with Marika, Doremi,  Tsubomi and.. who the heck?

turns out it’s a show called Oideyo! Henamon Sekai Kasumin or just Kasumin

it has a really prominent presence of Umakoshi, like REALLY obvious, just look at these 

it has HECKING 3 SEASONS but i can’t find raws anywhere?? only 9 episodes are subbed and it’s REALLY hard to find any info in english

cryptid anime

Linkin Park: Through Black Eyes

Featured Photo: Myself in 2007, in a Linkin Park t-shirt

Trigger warning: This article discusses the recent suicide of Chester Bennington, and his past, dealing with drug addiction, mental illness, and sexual assault.


Exactly a day after the news broke that Chester Bennington of Linkin Park had died, Afropunk posted a heartfelt and somewhat personal reaction, which encouraged black kids from ages 35 to 15 to respond in droves. For a certain age set of the black community, Linkin Park was our reintroduction to rock music, via the DJ styles of Joe Hahn, and the poetic bars of Mike Shinoda. They gave Chester’s lyrics and voice an edge that could cross barriers. It’s why the band resonated with so many people.

Unfortunately, not everyone could see that. An older generation of black people also weighed in on the article, unsure of what to make of this band, being herald by AFROPUNK as having given black kids the gift of rock. But if you were like me, in 2001, the internet was just a baby. My mother and nana, who both raised me, didn’t raise me on rock n’ roll, or its origins. How could I have known this glorious, and complex genre was invented by a queer black woman? Or even known that Chuck Berry came before Elvis? Enter Linkin Park.

They were one of the earliest bands I ever got into, with maybe Green Day coming in first. Linkin Park were the only band that showed me a side to rap that I hadn’t seen before. A sensitive, poetic branch. An album like “Hybrid Theory” gave me the space in my mind to later be able to consume or even conceive something like, Jay-Z’s 4:44. They were the first to show me how two seemingly different genres of music can meld together. They were one of the first bands I was truly devoted to.. if only for a passionate childhood and pre-teenhood. They were also the first band to teach me about depression, and trauma, and how it’s all connected. And I want, somehow, to further connect by writing down my experience of knowing Linkin Park, as a black person, the full extent of their contributions, and Chester’s legacy.

When the news first broke, I was in Sapelo Island. My partner and I were on vacation. We had only just gotten settled, when my friend Daniel made a vague Facebook post about Chester, that didn’t allude to situation.

I found out through Google. I couldn’t cry.

The thing is that, Chester isn’t by any means, a legend. Not even one his main influences, Stone Temple Pilots (for whom he front for a while), were legends. They were both products of legends (i.e. Mother Love Bone, the beginning of grunge), and they successfully rode that train of influence to a lucrative career. But despite this, Chester Bennington is someone that means something, to MILLIONS of KIDS. It is mostly kids who listen to Linkin Park. How on earth do you tell your young teen or preteen that their favorite singer couldn’t cope with the world? With 2016 having passed, I think we can all say we have had our fair share of heavy loss. But as an adult, how do you navigate the death of a portion of your life? That was what Linkin Park was, for black millennials; a gateway to a lifestyle

        Photo: A photo I took on the endless beaches of Sapelo.

This is also a story about trauma.

I don’t know how many know his story, but Chester was sexually abused for several years, by an older male friend. I know I have friends who have experienced sexual traumas. I know based on their experiences that recovery is so hard. And the trauma eats its way into habits (think “Breaking The Habit” from 2004’s Meteora), like drug addiction and eating disorders, and self harm. Chester had ALL of that, and then some, and while it may not have been the sole reason he took his life, it was one of many. A myriad of thoughts and actions, weighing him down to nothing. 

In a world where black pain is weakness, and often ignored, I sometimes felt kinship with Chester for the pain that, while expressed creatively, existed between the lines, that hid inside himself. He was an empath. I am an empath. And we exist in a minority circle of people who probably get hurt, a lot. 

Late at night on August 4th, I watched footage of Chester doing an interview, not too long before he died.

He was so alive. When Chester was alive, he was SO alive. He had the personality of the sun. His smile, and laughter, and playfulness, were all still incredibly infectious, up until he died. What has been hard is knowing that as intensely as he felt joy, he probably felt pain just as intense. But that was Chester. My only images of Chester in my mind are of two, radically different faces: His wide, open-mouthed smile, and his wide, open-mouthed screams, when performing. 

Part of what made Linkin Park relatable from the jump, and for almost 20 years, was their ability to tap into the angst (and beyond teenage angstiness) of an entire nation.. and farther. And that emotion is directly descended from Chester’s personal experiences with being a person, trapped in the memories of trauma and substance abuse, which he was very, very, painfully open about.. which made him, and the band stand out from the likes of Evanescence, Slipknot, and Limp Bizkit. So you can imagine, that anything that Linkin Park commits to tape for an album, is coming from a genuine place of heavy emotion.

With that said, despite them being honest songwriters until the end, the backlash towards their newest release (One More Light, May 19th), was, and still actually is, very severe. People genuinely do NOT like this album. Linkin Park have had their fair share of harsh criticism over their career, but I don’t think there’s been a single album of theirs that’s been met with such universal scorn.. despite it charting at number one, high numbers around the globe, before Chester’s death.

On August 16th, I got through listening to the album. It is not the worse thing I’ve ever heard. It’s just not what I expected. For half of it, I was simply bored. There is one song that I just had to skip, “Sorry For Now”, because it had a beat drop, and some synth stuff happening that made me feel like I was listening to Halsey or some shit, and I feel bad, but I just couldn’t do it. That one I genuinely hated. But there are highlights. The first single, “Heavy”, featuring Kiiara, is growing on me, mainly because the music video for it is so captivating. Mike’s verse in “Good Goodbye” was strong, but it’s his only rapping part on the entire album. “Halfway Right” would have been a better choice for a single than the last two that were released.

Photo: Hybrid Theory-era Linkin Park, photoshoot outtake | Credit: Jen Luciani

The saving grace of this album is its title track, “One More Light”; an entirely stripped, almost acapella take, that is heartbreaking, and sadly prophetic. I cry whenever I hear it. The final track, “Sharp Edges” is a wonderful, folksie song that should’ve been put before “One More Light”, instead of being the closer.. but that’s just how I feel. The album is not a total dud, it’s just not Linkin Park at their full potential.

Even an opinion like mine, paired alongside the harsh insults they have received, was probably incredibly painful, and damaging to Chester, who since the album’s release, has been accused of being a “sell-out”, prompting him to lash out in interviews and on social media in the immediate aftermath.. causing some musician friends, i.e. Slipknot’s Corey Taylor to tell him to take it easy, and try to tune out the negative, because at the end of the day, they’re still one of the biggest millennium bands in the world.

That probably didn’t help. Our “criticism” didn’t help. Based on interviews given before his death, clearly was having a hard time personally, leading up to the recording of the record. That’s something none of us probably ever take into consideration when listening to an album: the artist’s mindset. And I’ll be honest, since I haven’t consistently been listening to Linkin Park in about 10 years, I thought that because they had all these things going for them–charities, millions of fans, nice houses in California, the same band line-up for 15+ years, and the most upbeat personalities of any band i’ve ever seen, I assumed things were fine.

But Chester’s a person with clinical depression. Who had a therapist. Who probably took medication (or maybe not). Who experienced YEARS of trauma, and then years of substance abuse to try and silence his mind. How stupid am I to think that everything is fine, just because it’s been x amount of years, and he’s in a successful rock band?

I’m disappointed in myself, and as guilty as anybody, for accusing Linkin Park of “putting on” the angst in their recent work, thinking that they’re just trying to keep up with writing what they always write about. That the lyrics are “just words”, to fill in the instrumentation.

In that way, I’m pretty sure we’ve let Chester down. How fucked up is that?


Last night, I got high at a party with my partner, and inevitably, our conversation ending up toward Linkin Park. I thought it was drabble, but he said I should commit it to paper (or iPhone). That I had something to say.

I’ve mentioned earlier the lyrical content of Linkin Park’s songs. They are incredibly personal, and the last album is no exception. I’ve mentioned that, when Chester was alive, he was very much ALIVE. He radiated intense amounts of joy… but how that also means his pain was probably felt just as hard. Throughout his career, and particularly (and eerily) in the last year of his life, Chester had been candid, open, about his struggle with mental illness. There were hardly boundaries between him, the band, and his fans. Viewing the Instagram and Snapchat videos they’ve done in the last few months of Chester’s life, you can see how active of a participant Linkin Park is, in their fan base. And that’s what I want to single out, here: Chester’s death, was like the loss of a childhood friend.

Linkin Park’s fan base consists mostly of millennials. We grew up with Linkin Park. Those feelings of anger, depression, and anxiety that they knew too well, resonated with all of us. That’s what propelled them to the top of the charts. That’s what won them Grammys. But what made Linkin Park completely transparent, and still relevant after 18 years, was their kindness, namely Chester’s.

Chester made you feel like you were his best friend. It was in his physical enthusiasm. It was in his voice, and the way it engages with you. His sense of humor. His humility. Linkin Park were never a cocky band. The strength of their dedication and transparency with their fan base, made it feel like we knew them. And yeah, I felt like I knew Chester. It was like one of us moved away, but every now and then, one of us would make it back home to visit, and catch up. Was I listening to new Linkin Park, and keeping up musically? No. But I would play the old stuff, and reminisce about the intensity to which I carried a torch for LP, once. And now that Chester’s gone, there’s a significant chunk of that era that has died. He was brilliant. He was warm. He was kind. It’s still not fair.

I lost my best friend, that day.


If you or someone you know is suffering from depression, and suicidal thoughts, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Hotline (1-800-273-8255), CrisisChat, or the Trevor Project (1-866-488-7386).

I am also selling original, Linkin Park artwork, where 20% of month-end sales on all designs will be donated to Music for Relief (which has been redirected to the One More Light Fund, for Chester). Link below.

https://www.redbubble.com/people/serenepristine1/collections/744965-chester-donation-pieces?asc=u

Best and Worst of: Block B Photoshoots

Looking at Block B photoshoots is such a wild ride because on the one hand half of them look like this:

Thrift shop meets witch aesthetics and Park Kyung is holding a fake bird but it still looks good?

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anonymous asked:

Hello! I know you have got a lot of asks, and I wouldn't like to bother you, but I would like to ask you about the correlation between the bees and Louis. Why was everybody so excited when Harry got the bee tattoo? How do you know it is a bee? For me it looks as a fly as well. Thank you very much for your answer. xxxxx

Hi there!

Well, the first thing Louis ever said about BG was this

And it’s a word fairly commonly used by Louis

Also @lesbianslovelouis had said that she was going to get a bee tattoo when Babygate ended and that was a fairly popular idea for awhile. 

So when Harry showed up with this

People were like 

It was kind of hard to see at first, but if you look at how many legs and wings there are, it does look more like a bee to me

Amy also found this:

(x) And I think the tattoo looks more like that bee than this fly

Who’s to say. 

Anywhere here’s some incredible things I found whilst researching this…

God bless Google.