these-are-important-things

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Team Let Steven Dye His Hair Pink But Only If He Reclaims It As His Own Instead Of Trying To Imitate Someone Else First Because Really That’s Pretty Fucked Up 2k17

anonymous asked:

You always seem to have all the answers. What do we do to stop Trump? I feel helpless. I know of the elections in November for Senate, Congress, etc. what can we do in the meantime?

I took this question really seriously, so I asked my parents to help me answer this. Here is what my dad said: 

Here is what my mom said: 

Here is what I say: 

First of all, I am sorry for referring to you as “kid” to my folks. It was just a shorthand I used for them to understand in a simple way that I think you are someone younger than they are. They are professors/teachers, and are often tasked with communicating effectively with young people. (also, sorry if my dad misgendered you? I guess kid = boy in his head)

Next: Yes. To what my parents said. When I feel helpless I often turn to them because they are so blisteringly smart and compassionate, and if I seem strong and like I have all the answers, it’s because I come from an incredibly supportive family. I wanted to share that with you. 

  1. Furthermore, staying informed in the time of “alternative facts” is an act of resistance. Knowing is half the battle. There’s an app called Countable that will keep you informed of the latest developments in your local government and issues you care about. 
  2. Because our representatives are firmly planted in the last century, online activism doesn’t cut through the noise to them—but phone calls do. Here is a website called 5calls.org that helps you make those calls with a script, and is especially effective if you (like me) have social anxiety. 
  3. Here is a great “Stop Trump” reading list that @batlordart compiled. 
  4. Don’t focus on a mountainous goal like “stopping Trump” and instead expend your energy on things that will make you happier and healthier.
  5. Thriving is our first act of resistance.
  6. Don’t despair. I could vibrate with the conviction of how fiercely I believe it: we will get through this.
Things I wish I knew at 18

1. High school friendships don’t last.
Not the way you want them to anyway.
Even if you swam oceans of pain together.
Even if you never wanted to drift apart.
Friendships fall apart.
Most times they sadly do.

2. Your parents will still treat you like a child. They don’t care about your legal reality. When you’re with them, they still see you as their baby. That can get frustrating but also comforting.

3. Your undergrad degree won’t matter as much as you think it will. So choose what you want to explore. Don’t choose something you think is going to be your career. Chances are when you graduate you will be doing something completely different than what you were dead sure of when you started college.
Explore.

4. People are more selfish now. People are more broken now. People are more cautious now. Everyone has been through something that haunts them.

5. Everyone is suffering. Some will use that as an excuse to mistreat you. Some will because of that very reason be there for you in your suffering in anyway they can. Most times it’s hard to tell which person you’re being. Don’t be an ass.

6. Not everyone makes life long friends in college. You won’t. That’s okay. Nothing good comes out of forceful relations anyway. It can get lonely but at least that kind of loneliness isn’t because of shitty company.

7. Grades. Internships. Extra curricular activities. They matter. Everyone acts like it doesn’t but it does. Whatever choice you make, whatever your course may be, how you perform does matter. It isn’t everything but it matters.

8. Self care isn’t boring or unnecessary. It’s important. It’s hard but it’s crucial.
You don’t have to click pictures for aesthetics or share your progress. You can if it helps. But you don’t have to. Because that’s secondary. You know what’s primary. Do it.

9. Just because you become an adult by a number and are recognized as one because of law doesn’t mean you aren’t you anymore.
The way you are at 17 years 364 days, is the way you will remain at 18. Perhaps 19.
That’s okay.
There’s a lot learn. You may have fought and conquered adolescence but this is a completely different story. There are new skills and lessons to be learned. All previous ones may not necessarily remain valid.

10. You genuinely have to learn to let go.
Imagine your life to be a tiny box. A box that fits in your palm. If that box is full of past pain, regret and disappointments, of all the people who broke you, of negativity and dried blood, all the good things and beautiful people that are to come into your life will fall right off because there just isn’t enough space in that box. It is full of everything you don’t need or deserve.
Good things will come your way, they will fall into your hands but you still won’t be happy if you don’t remember to take out the trash.

Sleep On Your Own Time, Potter
  • <p> <b>Draco:</b> Potter.<p/><b>Draco:</b> Potter.<p/><b>Draco:</b> Potter.<p/><b>Harry:</b> Malfoy, what. What, Malfoy.<p/><b>Draco:</b> I've decided - I love you too. You have a really hot body. I'm always thinking about it-- you...thinking about you.<p/><b>Harry:</b> ...<p/><b>Draco:</b> Because I love you.<p/><b>Harry:</b> That's...great. Was it necessary to wake me up at half past three in the morning to tell me this?<p/><b>Draco:</b> Love doesn't wear a watch, Potter.<p/></p>