these are the people i share genetics with

  • Pisces: Why am I not a banana?
  • Aquarius: Because your genetic code dictates you are a human. However, it should please you to know that you share fifty to sixty percent of your DNA with a banana.
  • Pisces: Thanks, Aqua.
  • Virgo: ...Are you telling me some people are ten percent more banana than other people?
  • Archie: Why am I not a banana?
  • Jughead: Because your genetic code dictates that you are human. However, it should please you to know that you share 50-60% of your DNA with a banana.
  • Archie: Thanks man.
  • Betty: Are you telling me that some people are 10% more banana than other people?
  • Piper: Why am I not a banana?
  • Annabeth: Because your genetic code dictates that you are human. However, it should please you to know that you share 50-60% of your DNA with a banana.
  • Piper: Woah, thanks, Annabeth
  • Percy: Are you telling me that some people are 10% more banana than other people?

sharpington  asked:

when you reblogged that face tutorial you mentioned you rarely see your hairline depicted in art--which hairline is that? I've never thought to pay attention to them before

Hey hey!! I’m so glad you posed this question!!

Hairlines aren’t really extensively talked about in terms of design, and I find that people just tend to use the same old ‘rounded’ or ‘squared-off’ hairlines when designing characters, ignoring the fact that natural hairlines are just as diverse as our other facial features. We lack proper language to describe them, and outside of the black natural hair community, people often don’t give hairlines a thought until they start to go bald. This problem with lack of terminology actually made it hard for me to find good reference for you!!

My hairline actually isn’t that rare in East Asian ethnicities, yet because it’s undesirable and doesn’t conform to beauty standards, no one ever depicts it in art save for a very select few that make it a part of their distinct style. The two artists that immediately come to my mind are illustrators Hayashi Seiichi and He Jiaying. Here is an excerpt from a Hayashi illustration:

And one from He Jiaying:

(He’s illustrations actually helped me come to love my hairline, after years of hiding it and being ashamed of it. Nowdays I don’t stare at my hairline in the mirror, feeling insecure and self-conscious, fervently wishing I could make my baby hairs grow thicker. I now rock a bun nearly daily. Representation matters!!)

My hairline was once described to me as ‘a variation of the classic straight’- though it looks normal when my hair is down, when it’s pulled up, two sharp triangles of baby hair immediately make themselves distinctly visible, too short to get pulled back along with the rest. These two patches right above the temples are thin and fluffy, different in texture to the rest of the scalp.

Here are some examples I yanked from the internet. Pay attention to how the patches of baby hair are visible only when the hair is pulled back:

You can even see it in some of the selfies I’ve posted onto tumblr, lmao!! (#truffs face) My mother, grandmother and both blood related aunts (all entirely Korean) share this hairline with me. It’s entirely genetic, very common and nothing we should be ashamed of.

Now that I’ve embraced my hairline, whenever I draw myself or my characters who share this trait, I tend to deliberately draw in these patches of thinner hair, making sure to pay attention to the directional pull of the strands and visually communicate that it’s less full in these areas. I know my own insecurity made me hyper-aware of hairlines since youth, and normally people don’t pay attention to them at all. But I still objectively feel that they are an important feature of how a head is designed overall, and mine is a distinct physical aspect of myself, and I want people to know that I LOVE my hairline and I know that it’s worth being represented!!

  • Jun: Why am I not a banana?
  • Joshua: Because your genetic code dictates you are a human. However, it should please you to know that you share fifty to sixty percent of your DNA with a banana.
  • Jun: Thanks, Josh.
  • DK: ...Are you telling me some people are ten percent more banana than other people?

Sherlock [high]: Why am I not a banana?

Mycroft: Because your genetic code dictates you are a human. However, it should please you to know that you share fifty to sixty percent of your DNA with a banana.

Sherlock: Thanks, Mycroft.

Eurus: Are you telling me some people are ten percent more banana than other people?

  • James: Why am I not a banana?
  • Winn: Because your genetic code dictates that you're human. However, it should please you to know that you share 50-60% of your DNA with a banana.
  • James: Thanks man.
  • Mon-el, yelling from the other room: ARE YOU TELLING ME THAT SOME PEOPLE ARE 10% MORE BANANA THAN OTHER PEOPLE?
Never forget Kreed.

He took his last breath on May 12, 2016. He was 18, far too young. He died from complications of a rare genetic condition unrelated to his autism.

Kreed was nonverbal, needed lots of daily help and communicated via AAC. He was okay with his mom writing about, posting videos and sharing photos of his hard moments. He had a lot of hard moments and he wanted people to know what he went through.

But he had good moments to share. His smile was beautiful. His dimples are still gorgeous. He never faked a smile. Not once.

Kreed was amazing. Kreed loved to eat at Five Guys. Kreed was really, really cool. He wanted to be understood, and I think he made that dream come true. 

You are missed, Kreed!


Here is a video of Kreed getting excited about Christmas. The repeated bowing motions and slapping his hands together were some of his happy stims. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FexvImOvH8A

Remember Kreed. Remember him.

thebookbug  asked:

Any chance you could share where you got that chromosome dress? I know some genetics people who would love it!

Yeah! I got it from Svaha. They’re a FANTASTIC company that designs comfy clothes. I honestly can’t say enough good things about them. All their dresses have pockets- FUNCTIONAL POCKETS- and are tagless and you can just pull them over your head, and they make cute clothes for kids, too. They have really cute stuff that’s not traditionally gendered- it’s just cute!

https://svahausa.com/
https://svahausa.com/pages/about-us

They have a chromosome dress and a DNA dress that are both super cute, as well as dresses celebrating programming and coding, math, chemistry, medicine, dinosaurs, space… the list goes on. They also do a LOT of outreach and philanthropy for science literacy and women in STEM- right now, some of the proceeds from their weather collection are going to fund climate change research, and they’ve got a line of “Ninjas vs. Leukemia” scarves/t-shirts that helps fund childhood cancer research. Oh, and they’re super inclusive of different body types. Their adult clothes go up to 5x and the bigger sizes don’t hang like circus tents. It’s like they actually considered different body shapes when designing them! Amazing!

“What are you frightened will change when you have kids? What’s the big worry?”

Thanks for the ‘when’ there, armchair psychologist. That’s a red flag to begin with.

Put it this way. I’ve got a cold right now, and it’s a stinker. I can’t tell you how pitiful I feel. I’ve been crawling about the house for days, sniffling miserably to my angry boss down the phone and begging my husband to bring home soup. I emerge from my duvet cave only to make tea. I’ve watched every episode of Countdown they ever made. I am of no use to anyone right now.

Meanwhile, across the city, probably even somewhere on this street, there will be a mother of young kids who has the exact same cold that I do. And she will be cooking, cleaning, washing, drying, dressing, chasing, wiping, fetching, dashing, driving, soldiering onwards, because four-year-olds don’t give a fuck that Mummy feels poorly. 

Kids are humans in their most concentrated form, before life has diluted them - before the need for us all to get along has rounded off those sharper edges. 

And kids are selfish

Most toddlers don’t even realise that Mummy is capable of becoming poorly. Mummy is just the mechanism by which all their needs and all their whims are met. Did you know that a lot of children master the word ‘daddy’ before the word ‘mummy’? It’s because Daddy’s arrival home each evening is an exciting event, marked by a desire to greet him somehow, to call for his attention. While Mummy is just there all the time - she’s basically furniture. There’s nothing novel or remarkable about the presence of Mummy.

What do I worry would change, if I became a mother?

I worry I would vanish in my own life. I worry I would just never get to be a priority again, ever. I worry that my pain and suffering would always be deemed less important than a toddler’s whims. (Why do men never have to explain this? Why are women expected to be okay with it?)

Does all that make me selfish?

Absolutely it does.

And I want to offset my selfishness. I want to look after other living things on the Earth, not just myself. I don’t want people to suffer or go without for my sake.

But is the best course of action really to produce a small genetic remix of myself, then devote all of my energy to it? 

“Look how selfless I am,” I could say. “Behold how I sacrifice my own needs for the benefit of my child - just my child, of course. Nobody else’s. Just this specific individual child, who shares my DNA, and therefore deserves absolutely all of my resources, ahead of every other human in the world.”

If you want to give back, and do some good for other people, donate to charities building schools in the developing world. Give blood. Spend an afternoon at a soup kitchen. Give generously in support of your fellow humans, even those you aren’t related to. (Imagine!) Even those you will never meet.

Or hell, donate to the RSPCA - they’re doing good for living beings who aren’t even human. 

Now that’s selfless. You’re caring for people who are not only genetically separate to you, but they don’t even share your species.

So, to answer the question, no - I don’t want to put myself last in my own life. I don’t want to drag myself out of bed when I’m ill and in pain, all for the good of an unnecessary child I didn’t want to produce. On the grand evolutionary scheme of things, as a member of my species, I matter just as much as an immediate descendant of mine would. 

Why is everybody so desperate to hand over their life for someone else to live? What are you so ardently hoping your children will achieve? You go achieve it. You do it. Don’t just pass the baton along. You’re entitled to live your own life.

Why be yet another inch of vine, when you could be the fruit?