these are not adjusted for inflation

20 Behind-The-Scenes Facts About Pirates Of The Caribbean.

1. During the filming of On Stranger Tides, Johnny Depp spent over $60,000 out of his own pocket to buy waterproof jackets for 500 crew members to protect them from the cold, wet weather. 

2. While filming in London in October 2010, Johnny Depp received a letter from a local 9-year old schoolgirl, telling him her classmates needed help to ‘mutiny’ against her teachers. He turned up with almost no warning at the school in full Sparrow outfit, but advised against mutiny. 

3. In Curse Of The Black Pearl, Johnny Depp improvised many of his lines, including the notorious, “Bring me that horizon,” and Jack Sparrow’s catch phrase, “Savvy?" 

4. Depp and Verbinski have a funny way of describing Jack running away from danger. They both compared it to a “lizard running on water.” Looking back at pirates of the caribbean, we can totally see where they’re coming from.

5. The cast and crew walked away from filming with tons of “treasure.” When production wrapped, many of the people who worked on the film (including Johnny Depp) picked props out from the treasure cave to take home. According to Verbinski, not a single one of the cursed coins was left behind.

6. Geoffrey Rush was afraid that people wouldn’t notice him on screen when he and Keira Knightley were in the same scene. He came up with a solution, however. He thought that viewers watched films the same way they read books - from left to right - and thus, tried to be on the left side of the shot as much as possible so that people would notice him before they noticed Keira. 

7. Robert De Niro was originally offered the role of Captain Jack Sparrow. However, he turned down the role because he thought that the film would do poorly in box offices. 

8. Keira Knightley was only 17 years old when they started shooting the first Pirates Of The Caribbean. Because she was a minor, her mother had to accompany her to all of the shooting locations. 

9. Johnny Depp’s character, Captain Jack, is portrayed as having gold teeth in the film. The gold teeth were actually Depp’s idea, but he predicted that executives would want fewer gold teeth than he wanted. So Depp told his dentist to implant extra gold teeth as a bargaining tool. After negotiations with the film executives, Sparrow’s final number of gold teeth in the film was what Depp had envisioned all along. 

10. If you pay attention throughout The Curse Of The Black Pearl, there is a scab on Jack Sparrow’s chin that gradually gets bigger and bigger. Many thought that it was a mistake, but Depp revealed later that his was a prank he and his makeup artist had thought of together. 

11. Clothing and smears of charcoal were used to conceal Johnny Depp’s numerous tattoos. The "Jack Sparrow” tattoo on his arm in the movie is a fake, but he actually got a real replica after finishing the film, in honor of his son Jack. 

12. Originally, Johnny Depp wanted Jack Sparrow to have no nose and be afraid of silly things like pepper and the common cold. Disney rejected the idea.

 13. Jack Sparrow is known for his outrageous face makeup, but he didn’t start with that look. While filming in a cave, excessive makeup was added to all of the characters so they wouldn’t looked washed out on film. When the crew realised how cool the makeup looked on Johnny Depp, they continued to use it on him for the rest of the movie. 

14. The moment when Elizabeth kissed Jack Sparrow in Dead Man’s Chest was purposefully cut out of Orlando Bloom’s script so that the cameras could get a genuine, shocked reaction from him. 

15. The fourth installation, On Stranger Tides, was the most expensive film ever made at the time, not adjusted for inflation. The budget ran to $300,000,000. That’s more than the budget of all three Lord Of The Rings films combined.

16. Johnny Depp based his performance on Keith Richards because he thought that pirates were just 18th century versions of rockstars. 

17. The names of the three main characters are all related to birds: Jack Sparrow, Elizabeth Swann, and William Turner, who was a famous ornithologist. 

18. The scene where Orlando Bloom impersonates Johnny Depp’s performance was devised by Bloom who asked producer Jerry Bruckheimer if he could put it into the movie. 

19. According to the screenwriters’ commentary on the DVD, Will Turner is actually the best swordsman in the film, Barbossa and Commodore Norrington are evenly matched, and Jack Sparrow is the worst. 

20. During filming of On Stranger Tides in London a 'Jack Sparrow’ impersonator just walked onto the set. The guards did not think to ask for any ID as he looked so much like the character. 

anonymous asked:

Why should we want to give people free college tuition and free this, and free that? That does nothing but make those who actually earn a college education less competitive in the job market because it'll become oversaturated with people who don't deserve degrees, having them. At the end of the day, there need to be people flipping burgers & tending to the garbage -- and no, they shouldn't make $15 an hour either.

Let me get this straight, we should not insure that we have an educated workforce because you are afraid of competition. Also, we need people to flip burgers and pick up garbage, but we should not pay them enough to live. 

There is one thing you are right about, minimum wage workers should not be making $15 an hour, they should be making more. We have made huge gains in productivity in this country on the backs of middle class and lower class workers. These gains in productivity means that a current minimum wage worker has to be doing more fiscally productive work throughout their shift than they had to 45+ years ago.

So why is it, that when adjusted for inflation, we are paying minimum wage workers less than their counterparts 45+ years ago made. They are doing more work and creating more in profits then their past counterparts, why do they deserve less? 

If the minimum wage had just kept pace with inflation since 1968 we would have a minimum wage of $10.90 right now.

If the minimum wage had kept place with productivity since 1968 we would have a minimum wage of $21.72

These facts lead me to some interesting questions you might want to consider. 

If the wealthy have been taking almost $14 per hour of work from each minimum wage worker, how much do you think they take from you?

If the minimum wage was $21.72 an hour, how much more do you think you would be compensated now if your boss knew you could go get a job flipping burgers for over $45,000 a year?

See when you argue that others people’s wages should be kept below a living wage, or below productivity increases all you are doing is arguing for a lower wage for yourself. 

Those minimum wage jobs act as competition for workers time. If they are paying enough to lure away good prospects from other jobs, the compensation for those other jobs must be raised if other companies want to retain the talent they have or to acquire new talent.  

As a consumer, options are good for you. The more options you have for work, the higher your wages are going to be. The more options you have in product choice, the lower you will pay for a good. 

These are simple economic truths. 

But if you want to still argue that all of our wages should be kept down because minimum wage workers don’t “deserve” $15 an hour, by all means, go ahead.

- @theliberaltony

nyti.ms
To Understand Rising Inequality, Consider the Janitors at Two Top Companies, Then and Now
Focusing on core competence and outsourcing the rest has made U.S. companies lean, nimble and productive. It has also left lots of people worse off.
By Neil Irwin

By Neil Irwin

Gail Evans and Marta Ramos have one thing in common: They have each cleaned offices for one of the most innovative, profitable and all-around successful companies in the United States.

For Ms. Evans, that meant being a janitor in Building 326 at Eastman Kodak’s campus in Rochester in the early 1980s. For Ms. Ramos, that means cleaning at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., in the present day.

In the 35 years between their jobs as janitors, corporations across America have flocked to a new management theory: Focus on core competence and outsource the rest. The approach has made companies more nimble and more productive, and delivered huge profits for shareholders. It has also fueled inequality and helps explain why many working-class Americans are struggling even in an ostensibly healthy economy.

The $16.60 per hour Ms. Ramos earns as a janitor at Apple works out to about the same in inflation-adjusted terms as what Ms. Evans earned 35 years ago. But that’s where the similarities end.

Ms. Evans was a full-time employee of Kodak. She received more than four weeks of paid vacation per year, reimbursement of some tuition costs to go to college part time, and a bonus payment every March. When the facility she cleaned was shut down, the company found another job for her: cutting film.

Ms. Ramos is an employee of a contractor that Apple uses to keep its facilities clean. She hasn’t taken a vacation in years, because she can’t afford the lost wages. Going back to school is similarly out of reach. There are certainly no bonuses, nor even a remote possibility of being transferred to some other role at Apple.

Yet the biggest difference between their two experiences is in the opportunities they created. A manager learned that Ms. Evans was taking computer classes while she was working as a janitor and asked her to teach some other employees how to use spreadsheet software to track inventory. When she eventually finished her college degree in 1987, she was promoted to a professional-track job in information technology.

Less than a decade later, Ms. Evans was chief technology officer of the whole company, and she has had a long career since as a senior executive at other top companies. Ms. Ramos sees the only advancement possibility as becoming a team leader keeping tabs on a few other janitors, which pays an extra 50 cents an hour.

They both spent a lot of time cleaning floors. The difference is, for Ms. Ramos, that work is also a ceiling.

Continue reading the main story

anonymous asked:

Do you think fast food workers should be paid the same as EMTs?? Because here in California EMTs make $15/hr. EMTs are the people who ride in the ambulance to go save people's life's.

So, what you are telling me is that you think that if fast food workers get paid $15 an hour that everyone else’s wages would stay the same.

This line of thinking requires a lack of understanding of economics. That just isn’t how it works. If an EMT can quit and make the same money “flipping burgers” most of those EMT’s would leave their much more stressful jobs and go work for a fast food company. 

But EMT’s are still needed, Hospitals would lose massive revenues if there is no one to treat people on the way to the hospital. If the patient dies on the way to the hospital, they will have a hard time billing for treatments, since they cannot give any. As the number of EMT’s drops, it would become necessary for companies to pay EMT’s more so that they could attract and/or keep EMT’s. In turn, the wages for EMT’s would rise.

I have answered an ask similar to this in the past, so I am just going to quote myself:

“We have made huge gains in productivity in this country on the backs of middle class and lower class workers. These gains in productivity mean that a current minimum wage worker has to be doing more fiscally productive work throughout their shift than they had to 45+ years ago.

So why is it, that when adjusted for inflation, we are paying minimum wage workers less than their counterparts 45+ years ago made. They are doing more work and creating more in profits than their past counterparts, why do they deserve less?

If the minimum wage had just kept pace with inflation since 1968 we would have a minimum wage of $10.90 right now.

If the minimum wage had kept place with productivity since 1968 we would have a minimum wage of $21.72

These facts lead me to some interesting questions you might want to consider.

If the wealthy have been taking almost $14 per hour of work from each minimum wage worker, how much do you think they take from you?

If the minimum wage was $21.72 an hour, how much more do you think you would be compensated now if your boss knew you could go get a job flipping burgers for over $45,000 a year?

See when you argue that others people’s wages should be kept below a living wage, or below productivity increases, all you are doing is arguing for a lower wage for yourself.

Those minimum wage jobs act as competition for workers time. If they are paying enough to lure away good prospects from other jobs, the compensation for those other jobs must be raised if other companies want to retain the talent they have or to acquire new talent.  

As a consumer, options are good for you. The more options you have for work, the higher your wages are going to be. The more options you have in product choice, the lower you will pay for a good.

These are simple economic truths.

But if you want to still argue that all of our wages should be kept down because minimum wage workers don’t “deserve” $15 an hour, by all means, go ahead.”

- @theliberaltony

The Disastrous Production of Howard Hughes’ 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

Disney’s 1954 production of Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues by Richard Fleischer has long been the definitive cinematic version of the story. But it was not the first to enter production. In 1946, famous billionaire Howard Hughes attempted to make the film, following “The Outlaw” which would become his final completed film as director. The production would become one of Hollywood’s greatest disasters, taking the lives of over 90 actors and crew, costing nearly half a billion dollars (adjusted for inflation), destroying an entire island, and almost causing a third world war.

As the second world war drew to a close, Hughes was setting his sights on what he intended to be his magnum opus. Verne’s book had long been an inspiration to Hughes, in part inspiring his ventures into nautical enterprises, including the construction of the “Mahogany Mackerel,” one of the largest ships ever to sail. A party was held to mark the start of production at one of Hughes’ seaside homes outside of San Francisco (the mansion is now the home of director David Fincher), and was sadly marred when a drunken Hughes began shooting into the air with his crossbow and killed an albatross, which fell into the punch bowl.

The party featured the intended stars of the film, actors Gene Kelly, Gregory Peck, and Orson Welles who would portray Captain Nemo. It was an early blow to the film when all three actors departed the production on its first day due to infighting over an unsuccessful orgy the prior week. This caused a massive production delay during which Hughes bought up over 50 warehouses (including the world’s largest building at the time) to hold the sets and specially built water tanks until casting was replenished.

Two of these warehouses burned down (including the world’s largest building fire at the time), destroying the sets which then had to be rebuilt. By the time Hughes decided to cast unknown actors in the lead roles, ten more major set pieces had rotted away delaying the production further. Finally in October of 1948 the new sets and all actors were in place on the luxurious island of Bikini Atoll. The crew was to arrive at the shooting location on October 26th but was delayed by weather. This turned out to be a good thing as the United States conducted an unannounced nuclear test on October 27th, annihilating the island and the sets completely. The island is still not inhabitable to this day, and Howard Hughes, who owned the island, was compensated only $212 (adjusted for inflation) for his losses by the government.

Undeterred, Hughes began again with fresh sets, and new actors as the previous group had long since departed by 1950. This time, production finally began and footage was shot. It was never developed however because despite the expenditure of $800,000 (adjusted for inflation) on pyrotechnics for the first scenes shot, nobody had thought to temperature-protect the film canisters, which were opened at the lab and found to have melted completely into what amounted to large plastic hockey pucks. Hughes filmed the scene again, at the same cost, and then a third time when he was not satisfied with a background extra’s hair. This new footage too was lost when it was captured by rebellious 1950s teenagers who held it for ransom. They asked only $50 (adjusted for inflation) but Hughes refused to pay on principle.

The actors and crew were even more upset than Hughes that their work had been for nothing and so began the “Leagues Riots” of 1951. What sets remained were once more burned down, this time in protest. The lead actors were rehearsing in the sets at the time and all died of smoke inhalation. Hughes was also injured in an unrelated accident on the same day when he flew an experimental plane on its first test flight. He managed to steer the wayward jet back to his own property but missed the runway and instead crashed into another set, which had already been rigged for pyrotechnics the previous night, resulting in the loss of the set, pyro, plane, Hughes left pinky toe, and over 30 million dollars in production costs (adjusted for inflation).

Then the real problems began.

Hughes replaced the lead actor with Sam Normanjensen, once thought to be an great star on the rise. Unfortunately he was also a serial killer known then as the Sherman Oaks Ripper. He had killed 17 actors before he was cast, and filmed for only two weeks before he slaughtered and ate the spleen of one of his co-stars. Hughes was exonerated of any negligence but only after 50 million dollars (adjusted for inflation) in court fees and settlements with the actors family, one member of which visited the set on a later filming day to fire his pistol randomly at the remaining cast in anger, killing two more, wounding Hughes who lost his right testicle, and destroying a filming balloon that was the largest air vehicle ever built at the time (adjusted for inflation).

It was then that the Verne family withdrew their rights from the plagued production. Another legal battle cost in the millions, and by the time it was over in 1952, the sets had once again rotted away and had to be rebuilt. By that time, the Disney production was under way and Hughes spent millions more to spy on and sabotage the rival production. Several Disney employees fell victims to car bombs, others to arsenic poisoning, and one to auto-erotic asphyxiation, but Hughes was not considered responsible for that particular event. Walt Disney, of course, declared war.

The “War Between The Sets” began in 1953 as Hughes forces were driven off by Disney’s hired guns, the Mouseketeers which in those days were a fully armed paramilitary force. This skirmish took seven lives, but it was only the beginning. Hughes used his government contracts to secure two bombers and arms weighing in excess of 500 tons, all of which were dropped on Disney owned installations. Disney’s retaliation was severe. Hughes hotels burned days after, there were so many fires that Vegas and LA were both lit as bright as daylight even at midnight from the blazes. Hughes responded with bombings and drone strikes, with “drone strikes” in 1953 referring to dropping bees on ones enemy. One such strike which killed Disney’s allergic son, Walt Disney III (There was no Walt Disney II as Walt felt that talent skipped a generation). The conflict at one point threatened to spill over into Russia’s Southern American interests, leading the president to demand Hughes back down before turning the cold war into a nuclear conflict.

By the time a truce was called, Disney’s film was in theaters and Hughes was ready to call it a loss. He became reclusive and wasn’t seen much in public from that time on. Disney continued to be one of the largest entertainment companies in the world, and remains the producer of the most definitive adaptation of 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.

The book has not been adapted since, but David Fincher’s new version begins filming next week on a budget over 200 million dollars. Sadly, the production has already seen its first fatality, when fireworks during the production party at Fincher’s San Francisco home went astray and killed an albatross. 

We at FIJMU wish Fincher the best of luck on his upcoming production. He’s going to need it.

(See full image here! :D)

In retrospect Ford should have probably guessed that whatever Rick Sanchez had planned as a birthday adventure for Stanley and him would result in some sort of bizarre phenomenon that would inevitably result in trouble. Yet somehow, here he was, plummeting through the atmosphere of an alien planet, watching in pure scientific fascination while his entire body rapidly shrunk as he regressed in age.

“Yeeehhaaaaaa! I haven’t felt this spry in decades!” Fiddleford exclaimed as his beard vanished into the youthful face of a child.

“Pretty sweet, huh?” Rick called up from where he casually lay back free falling like he had no care in the world. He looked smugly like it was perfectly normal that he’d be a near seventy year old man in the body of a pale blue haired child skydiving towards an unknown alien landscape. “The atmosphere on this planet does some w-wild shit to mammalian genetics! Rrr-urp-re-reacts like a fountain of youth so to sp-speak. It’ll wear off when we leave but for the day, say ff-fuck you to ar-arthritis and enjoy being ten again boys!”

“Woah-oh cool!” Stanley yelled with the enthusiastic high pitch his voice hadn’t had since puberty. He flapped around laughing in his now vastly oversized suit for a moment, but Ford could have counted down on six fingers how long it took for the amusement to wear off and Stan to notice they were still falling rather fast towards the ground. “Uh hey, Rick? You got a plan for landing, right?”

“Huh? N-No shit, I just had us all drop outta the sky so we could rapidly de-age in a dramatic way only to die moment’s later when w-we hit the ground like pancakes.” Rick scoffed as his small arm fished in his oversized labcoat for something. “Wh-what kind'f-of mad genius do you take me for, Lee?”

With a flourish of his hand Rick produced a small capsule that he casually tossed beneath them. It quickly inflated mid air into a bouncy castle spire that caught their fall and delivered them safely to the planet’s ground through a large inflatable slide. Ford was not certain what calculations had gone into the elaborately childish safety device but there was definitely some sort of false gravity adjustment inside the oversized balloon castle that resulted in the desired safe landing instead of being flung back into the stratosphere upon impact. In short, Rick was clearly showing off.

(Awesome snippet by @stanchez-sloppy-seconds !!!! :DDDD)

5

Let’s take a minute and talk about Mamoru’s car… 

Now, thankfully, some other poor soul has gone through the trouble of identifying what type of car Mamoru sexily drove around for four seasons, because Lord knows, I don’t have the patience for that kinda mess.

But anyway, it is believed that Mamoru drove an Alfa Romeo SZ. And while, to many of us, myself included, the only thing that means is he owned a shiny red car. BUT there’s some pretty interesting facts about this particular model.

These cars were manufactured in Italy in 1991, which explains Mamoru’s driving seat being on the right when they drive on the left in Japan. Still, not that interesting, right? Well, as it turns out, only 1,036 of these cars were ever made, and of that 1,036, of which 38 were for testing, only 100 of the Alfa Romeo SZ’s were ever imported to Japan. (None made it to the US, as they weren’t street legal) So, right away, we know that Mamoru owns a pretty rare car. You just didn’t see these things on the road. I hadn’t even heard of it until I had way too much free time to do this research! 

After some further digging, I found that the original price for the SZ to be about $35,000. Well, that’s not so bad, right? But we have to remember that that’s $35,000 in 1991. Adjust for inflation, and you come to about $65,000, today. And considering the SZ was an import, it’s probable that it cost MUCH more.

So, what does this all mean? Well, only one thing, really. BOYFRIEND WAS LOADED. Orphaned, college student, dater of middle schoolers Mamoru was FLUSH WITH CASH. Like he could make it rain. 

And Usagi? I ain’t sayin’ she a gold digger, but… :D

Originally posted by ihiphop

anonymous asked:

I don't believe the construction of minimum wage was meant to provide funds for fun stuff. Also, in a way, a low minimum wage is helping fight male and female stereotypes. With a low minimum wage, it means it's more likely that both adults in a household need to work, fighting the idea that the man is the moneymaker and the woman is a housewife. In regards to your personal salary, think of what you are actually doing. With the rise of online shopping, do we need retail store workers anymore?

Let’s break this down, because each sentence is its own brand of asinine, and I can’t just tackle it all in one go.

  • “I don’t believe the construction of minimum wage was meant to provide funds for fun stuff.” In 1938, the night before FDR signed the law establishing the federal minimum wage, he said, “Do not let any calamity-howling executive with an income of $1,000 a day…tell you…that a wage of $11 a week is going to have a disastrous effect on all American industry.” The cost of living back then was significantly lower, even when adjusting for inflation. When a movie ticket cost twenty-five cents ($4.20 in today’s dollars), I doubt anyone was making a huge deal out of someone going to catch a movie, unlike today, when a movie costs an average of $8.17 (and here in NYC, is at least $12.50). And if someone did complain, and the person decided to go to Harvard and get a degree in the hopes of making more, they’d just have to raise $420 a year ($7,047 a year in 2015 dollars) to go. Back then, the money just went farther. And there were fewer bills to pay–cell phones and the internet didn’t exist, the only things contributing to light bills were literally lights, and so on. If you could pay for your basic needs on a minimum wage and have an extra twenty-five cents a week to see a movie or grab a beer, I doubt anyone would care. Aside from that, the inherent cruelty in seeing low wage workers as labor drones who don’t deserve happiness is p disgusting honestly.
  • “Also, in a way, a low minimum wage is helping fight male and female stereotypes. With a low minimum wage, it means it’s more likely that both adults in a household need to work, fighting the idea that the man is the moneymaker and the woman is a housewife.” This is peak heteronormative white capitalist feminism. “If it takes two people to make the income of one person, then we can destroy the patriarchy by all being exploited equally!” I’m actually impressed by how goddamn stupid this concept is.
  • “In regards to your personal salary, think of what you are actually doing.” What I was doing (the post made it abundantly clear it was a former job) was spending nine hours a day (we had an hour break which had to interrupt our eight hour shift rather than being factored in) plus three hours daily commute (an hour and a half each way) on a job wherein I was required to run (literally, because if a customer complained about it taking too long for me to get back from the stock room, I could have my hours cut or be suspended or fired) between five stock rooms across three floors making up 36,000 square feet. I had to memorize the locations of items on the floor I worked on and the ones I didn’t, the list of color codes, different folds for many different items, prices for at least the most popular fifty to a hundred items, and so on. I had to keep 15,000 feet of displays and shelves and tables fully stocked and perfectly folded and sized while people were shopping, and if I was standing around while something was unfolded across the store, I could have my hours cut or get suspended or fired. I had to do all of this with a smile on my face, because if a customer complained about my attitude, even if it was just for frowning, I could get my hours cut or get suspended or get fired. If the store did less than $250k a day in business, people’s hours were getting cut. I’ve done much higher-paying jobs since and they’ve been much easier.
  • “With the rise of online shopping, do we need retail store workers anymore?” Yes, obviously. Online shopping is for when you’re casually shopping but don’t feel like going to the store, or if there’s something non-vital you want a better price on. If you need something for an event tomorrow, you’re going to the store for it. If you don’t know your size and want to try it on without waiting a week, sending it back, waiting another week for it to get to them and have them ship it back out, and another week before you get the other size, which may or may not be right, you’re going to the store. If you want to touch the garments and see how they feel, or try them on in front of a mirror to make sure the cut and colors look good on you, or get a second opinion from a (more or less) neutral party. If you want to wander around from shop to shop and see what you can find. If you want to go to a thrift store. Plus, if we branch out of retail, fast food isn’t going away because of the internet, nor are servers or bartenders or housekeepers or custodians or grocery store cashiers or deli workers or anyone else who does a service that people use but are underpaid for their labor.

At the end of the day, there will always be workers in positions that are currently underpaid. If every McDonalds worker decided tomorrow to get a STEM degree and were given the means to do so, there would still be only a certain number of STEM jobs and a need for fry cooks. And those fry cooks deserve to be able to meet their basic needs just as much as anyone else.

okay hear me out:

  • resident evil 7 film adaptation with an (inflation-adjusted) 80′s horror flick budget
  • no cgi permitted
  • all the special effects are done traditionally with body horror techniques used at the time (see: the fly, the thing) 
  • want some molded? better start getting creative with rubber suits pal
  • its shot with older cameras/on older film to give it that authentic feel
  • special edition includes both a dvd and a vhs tape