theodore johnson

RAVENCLAW: “There are twenty, bright, highly capable negro women in the west computing group, and we’re proud to be doing our part for the country. So yes, they let women do some things at NASA, Mr. Johnson. And it’s not because we wear skirts. It’s because we wear glasses.” –Allison Schroeder + Theodore Melfi (Katherine Johnson: Hidden Figures)

anonymous asked:

Were there any Presidents to be sworn in on anything other than a bible?

John Quincy Adams and Franklin Pierce took the oath on a book of laws to represent the Constitution (not sure why they didn’t just use a copy of the Constitution), Theodore Roosevelt didn’t take the oath on anything when he was sworn in following President McKinley’s assassination, and LBJ was sworn in using a Catholic missal because they couldn’t find a Bible on Air Force One when he took the oath in Dallas before flying back to Washington after JFK’s assassination.

7

Hidden Figures (2016)

Directed by Theodore Melfi

Cinematography by Mandy Walker

anonymous asked:

If we had a president in today's world and they were like Jefferson and Madison ( I think it was him) and they struggled with the same thing they did, will it affect them in today's world? Would they be criticized?

24% percent of presidents had depression, including James Madison, John Quincy Adams, Franklin Pierce, Abraham Lincoln, and Calvin Coolidge. 

Anxiety disorders, ranging from social phobia to generalized anxiety disorder, among 8% of the presidents, including Thomas Jefferson, Ulysses S. Grant, Coolidge, and Woodrow Wilson.

8% of presidents had signs of bipolar disorder, Lyndon Johnson and Theodore Roosevelt among them. 

8% of presidents exhibited evidence of alcohol abuse or dependence. Pierce died of cirrhosis of the liver; Grant was once allegedly so drunk he fell of his horse during a military parade in New Orleans; and Nixon was once unable to take a rather important phone call from the British Prime Minister because he was “loaded.“

Numerous other presidents had physical conditions that can have a severe impact on psychological functioning. Taft, for example, had sleep apnea, which is associated with declines in cognitive functioning across the board, and most famously, some scholars now believe that Ronald Reagan showed early signs of Alzheimer’s while still in office.

Donald Trump has narcissistic personality disorder, Joe Biden has slid into depression, Hillary Clinton is clinically paranoid or Jeb Bush will be undone by a Freudian sibling tangle. But here’s the really sick thing: For a politician to admit to seeing a psychiatrist would likely be far more politically damaging than any of the possible symptoms of actual mental illness.

Nixon and John F. Kennedy filled their medicine cabinets with psychotropic drugs, recently uncovered documents reveal. President Lyndon Johnson was clinically paranoid or a manic-depressive.

Abraham Lincoln was famously melancholy, experiencing periods of such deep depression throughout his lifetime that he contemplated suicide and spent weeks at a time bedridden, like Thomas Jefferson. 

It’s a bad move to tell the people that you have a mental disorder. As terrible as it sounds, that’s just how the world works and it’s disgusting that someone could be judged, critized or even taken out of a race/office for having a mental illness. 

WEIRD TALES Anthology “Histoires d’horreur” 

(Fiction Special # 10, Opta, 1966)

So, this is it: the legendary first Weird Tales anthology in french language. How many copies have they printed ? Probably not more than 6 000…

“WEIRD TALES …This unique magazine also had a unique audience, which, faithfully for decades, brought its support against all the avatars of literary fashions against all odds. It finally succumbed during the science fiction boom, which led to a decline of the favor for supernatural and horrifying type history. But the name “Weird Tales” will remain as a symbol. And now that this pulp has disappeared for years, its mind remains. Here, quoted in these pages, are fourteen memorable tales - fourteen awakened nightmares. They represent a whole tradition, and they impose an indelible mark. By reading them, one can not help but dream, and to have the nostalgia of a magazine that was able to present, permanently, works of this class.” (publisher’s introduction, probably written by Alain Dorémieux or Jacques Sadoul))

Contents:

Robert Bloch “Notebook found in a deserted house”

Harold Lawlor “Grotesquerie”

Allison V. Harding “ Fog country”

Robert Bloch “Sorcerer’s apprentice”

William Hope Hodgson “The Hog”

Harold Lawlor “The door beyond”

Allison V. Harding “The underbody”

Theodore Sturgeon “Cellmate”

Allison V. Harding “The Damp Man again”

Mildred Johnson “The cactus”

Allison V. Harding “The seven seas are one”

Richard Matheson “ The slaughter house”

Robert Bloch “Enoch”

Theodore Sturgeon “The professor’s teddy bear”


source:amsaklapper’s collection

3

Hidden Figures (2016)
Dir: Theodore Melfi
DOP: Mandy Walker
“So yes, they let women do some things at NASA, Mr. Johnson. And it’s not because we wear skirts. It’s because we wear glasses. Have a good day.”

Please see UPDATE list at http://losttoy.tumblr.com/post/136395727651/black-people-killed-by-police-2015-as-of-jan-1

Blacks killed by police in 2015 (as of March 22nd)
Bernard Moore 62
Lavall Hall 25
Jonathan Ryan Paul 42
Jamie Croom 31
Terry Garnett Jr. 37
Monique Jenee Deckard 43
Tony Terrell Robinson Jr. 19
Tyrone Ryerson Lawrence 45
Naeschylus Vinzant 37
Andrew Anthony Williams 48
Dewayne Deshawn Ward Jr. 29
Ledarius Williams 23
Yvette Henderson 38
Edward Donnell Bright, Sr. 56
Thomas Allen Jr. 34
Charley Leundeu Keunang, “Africa” 43
Fednel Rhinvil 25
Shaquille C. Barrow 20
Kendre Omari Alston 16
Brandon Jones 18
Darrell “Hubbard” Gatewood 47
Cornelius J. Parker 28
Ian Sherrod 40
Jermonte Fletcher 33
Darin Hutchins 26
Glenn C. Lewis 37
Calvon A. Reid 39
Tiano Meton 25
Demaris Turner 29
Isaac Holmes 19
A’Donte Washington 16
Terry Price 41
Stanley Lamar Grant 38
Askari Roberts 35
Dewayne Carr 42
Terrance Moxley 29
Theodore Johnson 64
Cedrick Lamont Bishop 30
Anthony Hill 27
Terence D. Walke 21
Janisha Fonville 20
Phillip Watkins 23
Anthony Bess 49
Desmond Luster, Sr. 45
James Howard Allen 74
Natasha McKenna 37
Herbert Hill 26
Markell Atkins 36
Kavonda Earl Payton 39
Rodney Walker 23
Donte Sowell 27
Mario A. Jordan 34
Artago Damon Howard 36
Andre Larone Murphy Sr. 42
Marcus Ryan Golden 24
Brian Pickett 26
Hashim Hanif Ibn Abdul-Rasheed 41
Ronald Sneed 31
Leslie Sapp III 47
Matthew Ajibade 22

Blacks killed by police in 2014
Kevin Davis, 44
Eric Tyrone Forbes, 28
Jerame C. Reid, 36
David Andre Scott, 28
Quentin Smith, 23
Terrence Gilbert, 25
Carlton Wayne Smith, 20
Gregory Marcus Gray, 33
Antonio Martin, 18
Tyrone Davis, 43
Xavier McDonald, 16
Brandon Tate-Brown, 26
Dennis Grisgby, 35
Michael D. Sulton, 23
Thurrell Jowers, 22
Travis Faison, 24
Calvin Peters, 49
Christopher Bernard Doss, 41
Jerry Nowlin, 39
William Mark Jones, 50
Rumain Brisbon, 34
Lincoln Price, 24
Eric Ricks, 30
Leonardo Marquette Little, 33
Tamir E. Rice, 12
Akai Gurley, 28
Myron De’Shawn May, 39
Keara Crowder, 29
Tanisha N. Anderson, 37
Darnell Dayron Stafford, 31
David Yearby, 27
Aura Rosser, 40
Carlos Davenport, 51
Cinque DJahspora, 20
Rauphael Thomas, 29
Christopher M. Anderson, 27
Charles Emmett Logan, 68
John T. Wilson, III, 22
Christopher Mason McCray, 17
Kaldrick Donald, 24
Zale Thompson, 32
Terrell Lucas, 22
Ronnie D. McNary, 44
Adam Ardett Madison, 28
Balantine Mbegbu, 65
Elisha Glass, 20
Qusean Whitten, 18
Vonderrit Myers Jr., 18
O’Shaine Evans, 26
Latandra Ellington, 36
Aljarreau Cross, 29
Iretha Lilly, 37
Lashano J. Gilbert, 31
Miguel Benton, 19
Eugene Williams, 38
Tracy A. Wade, 39
Javonta Darden, 20
Marlon S. Woodstock, 38
Oliver Jarrod Gregoire, 26
Nolan Anderson, 50
Cameron Tillman, 14
John Jolly Jr., 28
Charles Smith, 29
Michael Willis Jr., 42
Briant Paula, 26
Kashad Ashford, 23
Carrey Brown, 26
Ceasar Adams, 36
Ricky Deangelo Hinkle, 47
Elijah Jackson, 33
Darrien Nathaniel Hunt, 22
Shawn Brown, 20
Alphonse Edward Perkins, 50
Naim Owens, 22
Kendrick Brown, 35
Eugene N. Turner III, 28
Ronald Singleton, 45
Jeremy Lewis, 33
Vernicia Woodward, 26
Cortez Washington, 32
Steven Lashone Douglas, 29
Desean Pittman, 20
Roshad McIntosh, 18
Anthony Lamar Brown, 39
Arvel Douglas Williams, 30
Darius Cole-Garrit, 21
Kajieme Powell, 25
David Ellis, 29
Luther Lathron Walker, 38
Andre Maurice Jones, 37
Frederick R. Miller, 38
Michelle Cusseaux, 50
Dante Parker, 36
Corey Levert Tanner, 24
Ezell Ford, 25
Robert Baltimore, 34
Dustin Keith Glover, 27
Eddie Davis, 67
Michael Brown, Jr., 18
Michael Laray Dozer, 26
John Crawford III, 22
Daniel Row, 37
Jacorey Calhoun, 23
Anthony Callaway, 27
Patrick Small, 27
Harrison Carter, 29
Vamond Arqui Elmore, 37
Donovan Bayton, 54
Charles Leon Johnson, II, 29
Briatay McDuffie, 19
Jonathan L. Williams, 25
Eric Garner, 43
Dominique Charon Lewis, 23
Michael Reams, 47
Lawrence Campbell, 27
Kenny Clinton Walker, 23
Tyshawn Hancock, 37
Charles Goodridge, 53
Cedric Stanley, 35
Ennis Labaux, 37
Warren Robinson, 16
Christopher Jones, 30
Icarus Randolph, 26
Jacqueline Nichols, 64
Jerry Dwight Brown, 41
Nyocomus Garnett, 35
Rodney Hodge, 33
Paul Ray Kemp Jr., 40
Dennis Hicks, 29
Samuel Johnson, 45
Lavon King, 20
Antoine Dominique Hunter, 24
Samuel Shields, 49
Juan May, 45
Denzell Curnell, 19
Ismael Sadiq, 30
Devaron Ricardo Wilburn, 21
John Schneider, 24
Jason Harrison, 38
Frank Rhodes, 61
Roylee Vell Dixon, 48
Broderick Johnson, 21
David Latham, 35
Lonnie Flemming, 31
Steven Thompson, 26
Thomas Dewitt Johnson, 28
Frank McQueen, 34
Sandy Jamel McCall, 33
Quintico Goolsby, 36
Dominique Franklin, Jr., 23
George V. King, 19
James Renee White Jr., 21
Devante Kyshon Hinds, 21
Pearlie Golden, 93
Jerome Dexter Christmas, 44
Armand Martin, 50
Dontre H. Hamilton, 31
Joe Huff, 86
Emmanuel Wooten
Matthew Walker, 55
Daniel Christoph Yealu, 29
Adrian Williams, 29
Gregory Towns, 24
Jameel Kareem Ofurum Harrison, 34
Zikarious Jaquan Flint, 20
Raason Shaw, 20
DeAndre Lloyd Starks, 27
Douglas Cooper, 18
Winfield Carlton Fisher III, 32
Deosaran Maharaj, 51
Daniel Martin, 47
Emerson Clayton Jr., 21
Rebecca Lynn Oliver, 24
Treon “Tree” Johnson, 27
Gabriella Monique Nevarez, 22
Marquise Jones, 23
Kenneth Christopher Lucas, 38
Keith Atkinson, 31
Yvette Smith, 45
D’Andre Berghardt Jr., 20
Stephon Averyhart, 27
Anthony Bartley, 21
Earnest Satterwhite, Sr., 68
Anneson Joseph, 28
Alton Reaves, 31
McKenzie Cochran, 25
Cornelius Turner, 19
Eldrin Loren Smart, 31
Henry Jackson, 19
Jordan Baker, 26
Gregory Vaughn Hill Jr., 30
Paul Smith, 58
Jeffrey Ragland, 50
Kendall Alexander, 34

First thing, this was put together early in the morning on March 22 using information from www.killedbypolice.net. This passes no judgment on guilt or innocence, just a full list. Second thing, this not include people like Travon Martin or Jordan Davis, who were killed by “stand your ground” laws by civilians. This also does not include kids like Lennon Lacy who found hanging from a swing set in North Carolina in what looks like a lynching. I also did not include anything pre-2014 since the whole “black lives matter” started. This by far is not a complete list.

However, this list is important. Sure Michael Brown, Eric Garner and Tamir Rice just get the headlines, but every name needs to be remembered.

Please see UPDATE list at http://losttoy.tumblr.com/post/136395727651/black-people-killed-by-police-2015-as-of-jan-1

flickr

John Theodore Johnson - Portrait of Mary Johnson by Irina

J. Theodore Johnson (born 7 November 1902 - 1963) was an American artist.

Portrait of Mary Johnson (c.1927). John Theodore Johnson (American, 1902-1963). Oil on canvas.

Johnson was educated at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1921 to 1925. He became an artist and instructor in Life Drawing at the Institute from 1928 to 1929. Mary, a portrait, was awarded a Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Prize at the 1928 Chicago and Vicinity annual exhibition of the Art Institute of Chicago.

The D Tent Boys’ real names in Holes are as followed: 

  1. X-Ray = Rex Alvin Washburn (his full name is revealed in the sequel novel Small Steps). 
  2. Armpit = Theodore Thomas Johnson (his full name is revealed in the sequel novel Small Steps, which incidentally focuses on his life two or three years after Camp Green Lake). 
  3. Squid = Alan. 
  4. Zigzag = Ricky. 
  5. Magnet = Jose. 
  6. Zero = Hector Zeroni 
  7. Caveman = Stanley Yelnats IV 
  8. Twitch = Brian. 
  9. Barf Bag = Lewis. 
3

May 26th 1868: President Johnson acquitted

On this day in 1868, President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial ended, finding him not guilty by one vote. Johnson became President in 1865 after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and was thus in power during the crucial stage of Reconstruction after the Civil War. However, Johnson did little to support the newly emancipated slaves, and opposed measures like the Fourteenth Amendment which granted them citizenship. A Tennessean and lifelong Democrat, Johnson was only chosen as Lincoln’s running-mate to give the impression of national unity. In power, Johnson was more sympathetic to the southern states than a northern counterpart may have been, frequently vetoing Republican proposals and issuing generous pardons to former Confederates. The unpopular President was impeached in February by the House of Representatives, with the main charge being that he violated the Tenure of Office Act by removing Edwin Stanton as Secretary of War. Johnson was then put on trial in the Senate, with Chief Justice of the Supreme Court Salmon P. Chase presiding. He was tried by two articles of impeachment, and both fell short - by just one vote - of the required two thirds majority needed to find him guilty and remove him from office. Whilst Congress gave specific reasons for the impeachment, many still consider the affair a mostly political retaliation by Radical Republicans against the President’s Reconstruction policies. Johnson and Bill Clinton in 1998 remain the only two Presidents to have been impeached.

time.com
Hidden Figures Calculates the Sum of a Story Untold
Katherine Johnson was always running. She ran, several times a day, the half mile from her desk at NASA to the "colored ladies'" restroom on…

Katherine Johnson was always running. She ran, several times a day, the half mile from her desk at NASA to the “colored ladies'” restroom on the other side of Virginia’s Langley Research Center, toting binders full of calculations so as not to lose precious time that–this being the height of the space race–the Soviets no doubt were using well. She ran around her home, chasing three daughters whose father had died of a brain tumor. And she ran, on a February afternoon in 1962, from the West Area Computing Unit back to Mission Control when John Glenn refused to take off on his orbit around Earth until Johnson, and only Johnson, double-checked his launch calculations.

When Taraji P. Henson, who plays the sprinting space scientist, read the script for Hidden Figures, Theodore Melfi’s drama about the black female mathematicians, engineers and programmers who helped get Americans into space, her knee-jerk reaction was anger. “I was like, What?” she recalls. “I’m 46, I went to college, and I don’t know this?” Henson’s co-stars–Janelle Monáe, who plays engineer Mary Jackson, and Octavia Spencer, who plays supervisor Dorothy Vaughan–both assumed they were reading a work of fiction.

“It’s cognitive dissonance,” says Spencer. “Black women being recruited to work as mathematicians at NASA’s southern installation defies what we think we know about American history.” Not to mention how Hollywood, historically, has depicted it. Consider movies about geniuses, like Good Will Hunting, A Beautiful Mind, Amadeus, The Theory of Everything, The Social Network. The brainiacs at the chalkboard, the piano and the computer are almost always white, almost always male. Consider films about accomplished black women–like Tina Turner, Josephine Baker, Billie Holiday–all singularly talented, but all entertainers. “We are tired, as consumers, of seeing the same protagonist be the hero,” says Monáe. “We need new heroes, and these women are new heroes for us.”

The phrase colored computer may bring to mind the candy-hued AppleiMac of the late 1990s, but in the early 1960s, it referred to the African-American female mathematicians who performed calculations and plotted data in NASA’s research divisions. Although white women had been employed in these roles since the 1930s, black women were not considered for them until 1943. With men at war and an Executive Order from President Roosevelt prohibiting discrimination in the defense industry, doors began to open for talented black mathematicians.

The story of Johnson, Jackson, Vaughan and their comrades in computation surfaced thanks to Margot Lee Shetterly, whose father worked at NASA with them, and who began work in 2014 on a book about them–now a best seller–also called Hidden Figures. Producer Donna Gigliotti optioned the rights the day after reading the proposal, Melfi backed out of talks to direct a Spider-Man movie, and Pharrell Williams, a space junkie who grew up near the subjects’ homes in Hampton, Va., signed on to produce and work on the score.

Filming in the Georgia heat this past summer, the actors formed a sisterhood inspired by their characters. “You saw these women vent to one another, encourage each other,” says Monáe. “They were dealing with obstacles and had reason to give up. But the relationships they had with one another gave them fuel to go on.”

There is more than a whiff of the classic American up-by-the-bootstraps narrative in each of their stories. Jackson petitions the city of Hampton to take courses at its whites-only high school so she can qualify to train as an engineer. Vaughan teaches herself programming when the arrival of computers threatens to make her job obsolete. But Hidden Figures, which will hit theaters on Christmas Day, downplays individual success in favor of the collective: these women pull one another up. Vaughan, in limbo as an undercompensated “acting” supervisor, laments her stagnation but rejoices in Johnson’s promotion to work on the calculations that will get Glenn, Alan Shepard and the Apollo 11 astronauts into space. “Any upward movement,” she declares, “is movement for us all.”

“NASA: Fast with rocket ships, slow with advancement.” This is how the women of Hidden Figures describe their employer, an agency that relies on inertia to keep its shuttles on their flight paths but maintained a different kind of inertia on the ground–one that kept the colored computers stalled at the intersection of sexism and racism.

The movie’s white characters are not monolithic villains but humans whose attitudes toward their black colleagues fall on a spectrum: there’s the mission-driven color blindness of the boss (Kevin Costner), who doesn’t care who does the calculations as long as they’re correct. There’s Jim Parsons’ head engineer, who can’t decide whether he’s more threatened by Johnson’s gender, her race or the possibility that she might be better at math. And then there’s Kirsten Dunst’s supervisor, perhaps most insidious of all, whose claims of goodwill are not backed by a genuine belief in equality.

When Dunst’s character has a run-in with Vaughan in the bathroom (more than a few critical moments take place there), she tells her, “I have nothing against y’all,” to which Vaughan replies, “I know you probably believe that.” Spencer sees, in their confrontation, a lesson. “A lot of people don’t see that their views could be hurtful. The only way you find out is if you have discourse. When you point a finger at somebody, all they see is the finger in their face.”

Fifty years later, Americans find themselves living with divisions wider than the passage of half a century might suggest. “We still have unfinished business,” says Monáe. “Right now in America, sexism and racism are alive and well. We can’t just hit the cruise control and think we’re going to get there in time to save this next generation.” For Henson, Johnson’s story is an appeal for unity and mutual respect: “You’re in a war, you’re fighting with a soldier, and he saves your life. Do you give a damn what color he is? What bible he reads?”

When we watch movies to learn about the past, we’re also scanning for insight into the future. Johnson, Jackson and Vaughan could be to young girls what Cicely Tyson and Oprah Winfrey were to a young Spencer, who dreamed of acting–to borrow a phrase from transgender activist and actor Laverne Cox–possibility models. Confirmation, in other words, that a path has been walked before and is available to those watching, too. For women of color, those onscreen models were, for so long, limited–to the maid, the jezebel, the sassy friend. The greatest equation Hidden Figures leaves unsolved may be whose story we’ll see next, and what moonshot she’ll be running to achieve.

Partway through the film, the cadre of mathematicians learns that rather than getting laid off as a result of the new IBM, they’ll be reassigned to help process its endless data. As they exit the windowless room in which they’ve toiled for years, headed for the center of NASA’s Virginia universe, trumpets blare as though they’re marching into battle. But it’s kitten heels, not combat boots, tapping cadence on the linoleum floor. And instead of firepower, they’re armed with brainpower.

This appears in the November 28, 2016 issue of TIME.

http://time.com/4574509/hidden-figures-theodore-melfi/

20 Favourite Re-watched Films of 2015

As the title suggests, my 20 favourite films I re-watched in 2015 (in no particular order):

  • Zazie dans le métro | Louis Malle | 1960
  • Hana-bi (Fireworks) | Takeshi Kitano | 1997
  • Dark Star | John Carpenter | 1974
  • Closely Watched Trains | Jirí Menzel | 1966
  • Breaking the Waves | Lars von Trier | 1996
  • Pitfall | Hiroshi Teshigahara | 1962
  • Mystery of the Wax Museum |  Michael Curtiz | 1933
  • The Company of Wolves | Neil Jordan | 1984
  • Festen (The Celebration) | Thomas Vinterberg | 1998
  • Sommaren med Monika (Summer with Monika) | Ingmar Bergman | 1953
  • Babettes gæstebud (Babette’s Feast) | Gabriel Axel | 1987
  • Seven Samurai | Akira Kurosawa | 1954
  • Les quatre cents coups (AKA The 400 Blows) | François Truffaut | 1959
  • Irma Vep | Olivier Assayas | 1996
  • Coeur Fidèle | Jean Epstein | 1923
  • Mahanagar (The Big City) | Satyajit Ray | 1963
  • Låt den rätte komma in (Let the Right One In) | Tomas Alfredson | 2008
  • The Red Shoes | Michael Powell / Emeric Pressburger | 1948
  • Ordet | Carl Theodor Dreyer | 1955
  • Brick | Rian Johnson | 2005

As usual I’ve done the “only one film per director” thing. Rohmer and some silent Ozus are hovering just outside the top 20…

instagram

For those we’ve already lost in what little of 2015 has gone by.

Bernard Moore
Lavall Hall
Jonathan Ryan Paul
Jamie Croom
Terry Garnett Jr.
Monique Jenee Deckard
Tony Terrell Robinson Jr.
Tyrone Ryerson Lawrence
Naeschylus Vinzant
Andrew Anthony Williams
Dewayne Deshawn Ward Jr.
Ledarius Williams
Yvette Henderson
Edward Donnell Bright, Sr.
Thomas Allen Jr.
Charley Leundeu Keunang, “Africa”
Fednel Rhinvil
Shaquille C. Barrow
Kendre Omari Alston
Brandon Jones
Darrell “Hubbard” Gatewood
Cornelius J. Parker
Ian Sherrod
Jermonte Fletcher
Darin Hutchins
Glenn C. Lewis
Calvon A. Reid
Tiano Meton
Demaris Turner
Isaac Holmes
A’Donte Washington
Terry Price
Stanley Lamar Grant
Askari Roberts
Dewayne Carr
Terrance Moxley
Theodore Johnson
Cedrick Lamont Bishop
Anthony Hill
Terence D. Walke
Janisha Fonville
Phillip Watkins
Anthony Bess
Desmond Luster, Sr.
James Howard Allen
Natasha McKenna
Herbert Hill
Markell Atkins
Kavonda Earl Payton
Rodney Walker
Donte Sowell
Mario A. Jordan
Artago Damon Howard
Andre Larone Murphy Sr.
Marcus Ryan Golden
Brian Pickett
Hashim Hanif Ibn Abdul-Rasheed
Ronald Sneed
Leslie Sapp III
Matthew Ajibade
Rekia Boyd
Freddie Gray
Mya Hall

And countless others.

Rest in power.

Made with Instagram
Here are the names of Black people killed by police in 2015 (R.I.P)

(and these are just the ones we know about)

Walter Scott 50
Bernard Moore 62
Lavall Hall 25
Jonathan Ryan Paul 42
Jamie Croom 31
Terry Garnett Jr. 37
Monique Jenee Deckard 43
Tony Terrell Robinson Jr. 19
Tyrone Ryerson Lawrence 45
Naeschylus Vinzant 37
Andrew Anthony Williams 48
Dewayne Deshawn Ward Jr. 29
Ledarius Williams 23
Yvette Henderson 38
Edward Donnell Bright, Sr. 56
Thomas Allen Jr. 34
Charley Leundeu Keunang, “Africa” 43
Fednel Rhinvil 25
Shaquille C. Barrow 20
Kendre Omari Alston 16
Brandon Jones 18
Darrell “Hubbard” Gatewood 47
Cornelius J. Parker 28
Ian Sherrod 40
Jermonte Fletcher 33
Darin Hutchins 26
Glenn C. Lewis 37
Calvon A. Reid 39
Tiano Meton 25
Demaris Turner 29
Isaac Holmes 19
A’Donte Washington 16
Terry Price 41
Stanley Lamar Grant 38
Askari Roberts 35
Dewayne Carr 42
Terrance Moxley 29
Theodore Johnson 64
Cedrick Lamont Bishop 30
Anthony Hill 27
Terence D. Walke 21
Janisha Fonville 20
Phillip Watkins 23
Anthony Bess 49
Desmond Luster, Sr. 45
James Howard Allen 74
Natasha McKenna 37
Herbert Hill 26
Markell Atkins 36
Kavonda Earl Payton 39
Rodney Walker 23
Donte Sowell 27
Mario A. Jordan 34
Artago Damon Howard 36
Andre Larone Murphy Sr. 42
Marcus Ryan Golden 24
Brian Pickett 26
Hashim Hanif Ibn Abdul-Rasheed 41
Ronald Sneed 31
Leslie Sapp III 47
Matthew Ajibade 22

Here are the names of Black people killed by police in 2014 (R.I.P)

Kevin Davis, 44
Eric Tyrone Forbes, 28
Jerame C. Reid, 36
David Andre Scott, 28
Quentin Smith, 23
Terrence Gilbert, 25
Carlton Wayne Smith, 20
Gregory Marcus Gray, 33
Antonio Martin, 18
Tyrone Davis, 43
Xavier McDonald, 16
Brandon Tate-Brown, 26
Dennis Grisgby, 35
Michael D. Sulton, 23
Thurrell Jowers, 22
Travis Faison, 24
Calvin Peters, 49
Christopher Bernard Doss, 41
Jerry Nowlin, 39
William Mark Jones, 50
Rumain Brisbon, 34
Lincoln Price, 24
Eric Ricks, 30
Leonardo Marquette Little, 33
Tamir E. Rice, 12
Akai Gurley, 28
Myron De’Shawn May, 39
Keara Crowder, 29
Tanisha N. Anderson, 37
Darnell Dayron Stafford, 31
David Yearby, 27
Aura Rosser, 40
Carlos Davenport, 51
Cinque DJahspora, 20
Rauphael Thomas, 29
Christopher M. Anderson, 27
Charles Emmett Logan, 68
John T. Wilson, III, 22
Christopher Mason McCray, 17
Kaldrick Donald, 24
Zale Thompson, 32
Terrell Lucas, 22
Ronnie D. McNary, 44
Adam Ardett Madison, 28
Balantine Mbegbu, 65
Elisha Glass, 20
Qusean Whitten, 18
Vonderrit Myers Jr., 18
O’Shaine Evans, 26
Latandra Ellington, 36
Aljarreau Cross, 29
Iretha Lilly, 37
Lashano J. Gilbert, 31
Miguel Benton, 19
Eugene Williams, 38
Tracy A. Wade, 39
Javonta Darden, 20
Marlon S. Woodstock, 38
Oliver Jarrod Gregoire, 26
Nolan Anderson, 50
Cameron Tillman, 14
John Jolly Jr., 28
Charles Smith, 29
Michael Willis Jr., 42
Briant Paula, 26
Kashad Ashford, 23
Carrey Brown, 26
Ceasar Adams, 36
Ricky Deangelo Hinkle, 47
Elijah Jackson, 33
Darrien Nathaniel Hunt, 22
Shawn Brown, 20
Alphonse Edward Perkins, 50
Naim Owens, 22
Kendrick Brown, 35
Eugene N. Turner III, 28
Ronald Singleton, 45
Jeremy Lewis, 33
Vernicia Woodward, 26
Cortez Washington, 32
Steven Lashone Douglas, 29
Desean Pittman, 20
Roshad McIntosh, 18
Anthony Lamar Brown, 39
Arvel Douglas Williams, 30
Darius Cole-Garrit, 21
Kajieme Powell, 25
David Ellis, 29
Luther Lathron Walker, 38
Andre Maurice Jones, 37
Frederick R. Miller, 38
Michelle Cusseaux, 50
Dante Parker, 36
Corey Levert Tanner, 24
Ezell Ford, 25
Robert Baltimore, 34
Dustin Keith Glover, 27
Eddie Davis, 67
Michael Brown, Jr., 18
Michael Laray Dozer, 26
John Crawford III, 22
Daniel Row, 37
Jacorey Calhoun, 23
Anthony Callaway, 27
Patrick Small, 27
Harrison Carter, 29
Vamond Arqui Elmore, 37
Donovan Bayton, 54
Charles Leon Johnson, II, 29
Briatay McDuffie, 19
Jonathan L. Williams, 25
Eric Garner, 43
Dominique Charon Lewis, 23
Michael Reams, 47
Lawrence Campbell, 27
Kenny Clinton Walker, 23
Tyshawn Hancock, 37
Charles Goodridge, 53
Cedric Stanley, 35
Ennis Labaux, 37
Warren Robinson, 16
Christopher Jones, 30
Icarus Randolph, 26
Jacqueline Nichols, 64
Jerry Dwight Brown, 41
Nyocomus Garnett, 35
Rodney Hodge, 33
Paul Ray Kemp Jr., 40
Dennis Hicks, 29
Samuel Johnson, 45
Lavon King, 20
Antoine Dominique Hunter, 24
Samuel Shields, 49
Juan May, 45
Denzell Curnell, 19
Ismael Sadiq, 30
Devaron Ricardo Wilburn, 21
John Schneider, 24
Jason Harrison, 38
Frank Rhodes, 61
Roylee Vell Dixon, 48
Broderick Johnson, 21
David Latham, 35
Lonnie Flemming, 31
Steven Thompson, 26
Thomas Dewitt Johnson, 28
Frank McQueen, 34
Sandy Jamel McCall, 33
Quintico Goolsby, 36
Dominique Franklin, Jr., 23
George V. King, 19
James Renee White Jr., 21
Devante Kyshon Hinds, 21
Pearlie Golden, 93
Jerome Dexter Christmas, 44
Armand Martin, 50
Dontre H. Hamilton, 31
Joe Huff, 86
Emmanuel Wooten
Matthew Walker, 55
Daniel Christoph Yealu, 29
Adrian Williams, 29
Gregory Towns, 24
Jameel Kareem Ofurum Harrison, 34
Zikarious Jaquan Flint, 20
Raason Shaw, 20
DeAndre Lloyd Starks, 27
Douglas Cooper, 18
Winfield Carlton Fisher III, 32
Deosaran Maharaj, 51
Daniel Martin, 47
Emerson Clayton Jr., 21
Rebecca Lynn Oliver, 24
Treon “Tree” Johnson, 27
Gabriella Monique Nevarez, 22
Marquise Jones, 23
Kenneth Christopher Lucas, 38
Keith Atkinson, 31
Yvette Smith, 45
D’Andre Berghardt Jr., 20
Stephon Averyhart, 27
Anthony Bartley, 21
Earnest Satterwhite, Sr., 68
Anneson Joseph, 28
Alton Reaves, 31
McKenzie Cochran, 25
Cornelius Turner, 19
Eldrin Loren Smart, 31
Henry Jackson, 19
Jordan Baker, 26
Gregory Vaughn Hill Jr., 30
Paul Smith, 58
Jeffrey Ragland, 50
Kendall Alexander, 34

This is what it feels like to be black in America. It sounds like the symphony of locking car doors as I traipse through a grocery store parking lot, armed with kale chips and turkey bacon. It looks like smiling when I don’t feel like it. It’s the instinct to enunciate differently, to use acceptable methods of signaling that I am safe to engage, or at least to disregard. “We wear the mask that grins and lies,” wrote the poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. I feel that mask covering my soul, never allowing me to just freely exist.

I could argue that any negative reaction to my skin is a problem for others to grapple with and of no concern to me. I’ve tried that approach before; one memorable attempt ended with me being pulled out of my car by two police officers and handcuffed for the felonious infractions of having a blown headlight and insufficient self-abasement. It is an unspoken rule that blackness’ first and most important task is to make everyone feel safe from it. We ignore this mandate at our own peril, realizing that a simple misunderstanding is a life or death proposition.

Jonathan Ferrell ran towards police seeking help after a car accident and was given a hail of bullets for his troubles. Renisha McBride went in search of a Good Samaritan after her accident and a shotgun blast answered her knock. Teenager Trayvon Martin walked home with candy and tea and was greeted by the nervous trigger finger wrapped in an adult’s gun. Jordan Davis sat in a car outside a convenience store listening to music and a man who objected to the volume cut his life short with the boom of a firearm. The principal crime all of them committed, like countless others over the centuries, was being black and not sufficiently prostrating themselves to ensure the comfort of others.

“That’s how privilege works. Privilege is invisible to those who have it. It’s a luxury.”

Privilege is not what you think, but the opposite: it’s what you don’t have to think about. It’s what you don’t see when you look in the mirror.

—  Theodore Johnson