their album is fantastic

Today in Prince history 4/22

1985 - Prince released the album “Around The World In a Day.” It was his first release after “Purple Rain.”

2000 - Prince won Top Major Label Release and Best R&B Album for “Rave Un2 the Joy Fantastic” at the Minnesota Music Awards.

2004 - The CD-Single for Prince’s “Musicology” was released.

KPOP boy groups in 2020

bts: still so much teen angst. rapmonster ran out of novels to base the mv’s on, therefore their newest concept contains spongebob references., hoseoks face is now used as the sun on korean weather forecasts, jungkook has accidentally one a gold medal at the olympic games. twice.

ikon: haven’t had a comeback in years. YG claims they’re still working on it, but he actually put them somewhere in his dungeon, he can’t just remember WHERE

exo: all busy with their solo activities, the only thing they released this year is a compilation of baekhyun screaming while playing video games. still win ‘album of the year’

big bang: the korean anthem is now fantastic baby, the flag the poster for their next comeback. this is what happens when you let G-Dragon join the military

monsta x: still haven’t won on a music show, still release awesome music, but hey, they crafted their own awards now and are still doing their thing, so it’s okay

seventeen: have lost a few members. can’t have a comeback until somebody finds an explanation why they are still called seventeen. Woozi hijacked a recording studio and is now releasing his own music. 

shinee: since sm ran out of crazy ideas for their new album their next concept features ‘the cool and elegant tunes of minnesongs of the 11th century’. they still manage to involve hip thrusts and shirtless performances. so authentic. 

got7: bambam managed to become a huge internet meme, retired from being a singer because ‘he achieved anything he ever dreamed of’ 

did f(x) seriously lose a member, reinvent themselves, release a fantastic album, have their first ever concerts sell out + an encore, and release one of the best station songs SM ever had with a music video self filmed and produced by a member herself just to be thrown into the most likely to disband pile? like is this a joke?

When did it become OK to be a dick to Taylor Swift?

She has every right to be proud of her achievements

by David Farrell 3 days ago 209 Views

~~

It’s cool to hate Taylor Swift.

If you were to believe what people say about Taylor Swift you would think she is nothing less than an evil mastermind bent on world destruction when, in fact, she is simply a musician whose work has been justifiably recognised for its more than considerable merit.

You may say that people hate on Taylor because Kim Kardashian exposed her as a snake, but in reality this was just the final straw. The tide has started to turn against Taylor well before that. The hate she received and is still receiving for winning the Grammy for Album of the Year in 2015 (which was completely beyond her control by the way) is a perfect example of that.

The fact is that people loathe to celebrate successful people, especially women. When it seems like someone is getting popular, they are immediately seen as too big for their boots and the criticism starts rolling in. They are the real snakes, not Taylor.

A perfect example of this is this article from BuzzFeed which accuses Taylor of making her entire career off playing the victim. BuzzFeed have previously been very supportive of Taylor, publishing articles like “21 Times Taylor Swift Proved She Has A Heart Of Gold”, “17 Reasons Why Taylor Swift Couldn’t Possibly Top “1989”. If you’re going to be critical, then please show a consistent line.

The truth is that now that it’s in vogue to hate on Taylor, publications like BuzzFeed have readily jumped on the bandwagon. Penning a 20-page long essay about how much you despise someone is tantamount to creating a ‘Mean Girls’-esque burn book. Not only is this playground behaviour, but also a colossal waste of everyone’s time. The whole article is redundant because by engaging in a personal attack upon Taylor’s character it ends up doing very thing it claims Taylor Swift has based her whole career on – turning her into a victim.

The disturbingly ruthless character assassination of Taylor has come about in an age when America is rebelling against the traditional girl next door. This once practically untouchable archetype has now been thrown out of the window in favour of celebrating diversity, which is undoubtedly fantastic for society. What we must be careful of, however, is to not go too far the other way in order to achieve this goal of equality.

How can the persecution of what Taylor stands for – the girl next door – belong in the diverse accepting society we want to create? This is a society where there is room for the gay kid, the black kid and the girl next door to sit at the same table, rather than one where the girl next door is left out to justify the years she enjoyed the spotlight over others. That’s called reverse discrimination, which benefits nobody. What we need to strive towards is equal spotlight, equal recognition.

There now exists a paradox whereby white artists like Taylor Swift, Justin Bieber and Ariana Grande, who all received Grammy nominations this year, are still clearly favoured by established institutions such as The Grammys, as evidenced by the events of last Sunday, but their work is unfairly dismissed by the masses as redundant fluff.

Taylor Swift winning Album of the Year angered a lot of people and whether or not it was the right decision it was the decision which was made and Taylor has every right to be proud of her achievement. After all, this was the moment she had worked for since she was 15. The culmination of the fruits of her labour. The fulfilment of her dreams. To rob anyone of that satisfaction is bullying no matter what the reason.

The fact is that ‘1989’ was, in fact, one of the best albums in recent memory, you can check out this BuzzFeed article for all the reasons why. You don’t need to carry a political message in order to be a bloody fantastic album. Taylor’s mastery lies in reinvention and pitch perfect PR campaigns. And newsflash, every single artist manipulates the media – Beyonce herself is just as shrewd a businesswoman and people adore her. It’s a fickle business.

The matter is one of respect. Artists, generally speaking, are much better at showing respect for one another, which is important considering that we lived in an era when pop is looked down upon as a lesser art. Taylor Swift had already declared herself a fan of Kendrick Lamar when she asked him to feature on her song ‘Bad Blood’. If Lamar did not respect Taylor’s work he would have declined, which begs the questions as to why the general public is so damning of Taylor on behalf of Lamar when the artist himself publicly has already declared his respect for her work.

Taylor Swift is an intelligent, strong woman who has managed to create a successful career for herself out of nothing and that is purely based on talent, not playing the victim. Do you think people who buy her albums if they carried the same message, but without her level of musical mastery? Absolutely not. Does society need to change to recognise more diverse talent – of course, but don’t blame Taylor Swift for a problem that should be equally shouldered by all of us.

The fact is that people loathe to celebrate successful people, especially women. When it seems like someone is getting popular, they are immediately seen as too big for their boots and the criticism starts rolling in. They are the real snakes, not Taylor. A perfect example of this is this article from BuzzFeed which accuses Taylor of making her entire career off playing the victim. BuzzFeed have previously been very supportive of Taylor, publishing articles like “21 Times Taylor Swift Proved She Has A Heart Of Gold”, “17 Reasons Why Taylor Swift Couldn’t Possibly Top “1989”. If you’re going to be critical, then please show a consistent line.The truth is that now that it’s in vogue to hate on Taylor, publications like BuzzFeed have readily jumped on the bandwagon. Not only is this playground behaviour, but also a colossal waste of everyone’s time. The whole article is redundant because by engaging in a personal attack upon Taylor’s character it ends up doing very thing it claims Taylor Swift has based her whole career on – turning her into a victim. How can the persecution of what Taylor stands for – the girl next door – belong in the diverse accepting society we want to create? This is a society where there is room for the gay kid, the black kid and the girl next door to sit at the same table, rather than one where the girl next door is left out to justify the years she enjoyed the spotlight over others. That’s called reverse discrimination, which benefits nobody. What we need to strive towards is equal spotlight, equal recognition. Taylor Swift winning Album of the Year , whether or not it was the right decision it was the decision which was made and Taylor has every right to be proud of her achievement. After all, this was the moment she had worked for since she was 15. The culmination of the fruits of her labour. The fulfilment of her dreams. To rob anyone of that satisfaction is bullying no matter what the reason. You don’t need to carry a political message in order to be a bloody fantastic album. Taylor Swift is an intelligent, strong woman who has managed to create a successful career for herself out of nothing and that is purely based on talent, not playing the victim. Do you think people who buy her albums if they carried the same message, but without her level of musical mastery? Absolutely not. Does society need to change to recognise more diverse talent – of course, but don’t blame Taylor Swift for a problem that should be equally shouldered by all of us.
—  Maximum Pop - Uk article
Bigbang got me like
  • at my funeral: “We now mourn the death of our friend by playing a song that meant so much to them.”
  • *music starts to play* yeogi buteora, modu moyeora
  • me: *breaks out of coffin* WE GON' PARTY LIKE LILILILALALA
mirror.co.uk
My bizarre job interview to work for Prince
Alan Edwards flew to Paisley Park after being asked whether he wanted to be Prince's UK PR man. But there was no way to prepare for the interview that followed
By Ashleigh Rainbird

From PR guru Alan Edwards landed his dream job to represent Prince – after the weirdest job interview ever.

The Outside Organisation boss tells the Mirror about his trip to Paisley Park, where he expected to meet the superstar himself.

Alan tells the Mirror: “I got a call from someone in LA who asked if I’d consider being Prince’s UK PR. I said: ‘Of course, yes.’

“I was flown out to Minneapolis – it was winter, pretty bleak – and there’s a driver waiting there. He takes me, and it feels like the middle of nowhere, there’s endless fir trees, then suddenly, out of the snowy landscape, up pops an extraordinary white, space age building – Paisley Park.

“It was like something out of E.T. or Star Wars. This was the 1980s, I’d never seen anything like it.

“I knocked on the door, someone answered and sent me up to a room upstairs where I sat down. But when I say a room, it wasn’t a normal room. It was sort of suspended, and it had a glass floor. It was like being in a see through cage.

“Nobody had said anything to me yet. It wasn’t even as if anyone brought me a cup of tea.

“Then a button was pushed and music starts coming out – and it’s fantastic. It’s Prince’s album Diamonds and Pearls, which hadn’t been released yet. So I’m just sitting there, completely on my own, in this see through room, listening to this album.”

But despite being in an clear, empty room, Alan wondered if he was being watched.

“I had a sensation that I was being observed,” he continues. “You get that feeling. I couldn’t work out what it was, but I thought I better really put some energy into listening to the record.

“I was tapping my feet, moving my head, but I think I stopped short of getting up and playing air guitar.

“I was really getting into it, which wasn’t hard because it was truly a lovely album and I still think one of his greatest and slightly overlooked albums.”

The entire album – all 65 minutes – were played without interruption as Alan sat by himself.

“Nobody had come in, nobody had said anything,” he continues. “Then it finished and someone says: 'Your car’s outside.’ And I leave.”

Returning to the airport, he wondered if his Prince experience had come to an end, but was startled when his stretch limo driver struck up an unusual conversation.

“We’re driving back through the pine trees and snowy landscape and he said: 'Well, what did you think of this song?’ And: 'What did you think of the vocals there?’ He really peppered me with questions – it was like a school exam.

“It dawned on me quickly that this was maybe not casual conversation. The driver was cross questioning me like a music journalist, forensically, about the album.

“It occurred to me very fast that in one way or another, maybe this was being relayed back to someone. For a minute I wondered who was under that cap!

“I was questioned all the way to the airport. It was a lot easier than my O Levels because I had a passion for it, and I’d just heard a great record. I didn’t have to ham it up too much.”

Returning to London, Alan heard nothing from Paisley Park. He began to think he might not have got the job.

But, he says: “Then in the office three days later, and the phone rings and a voice says: 'You’re hired.’ And that was that.”

For the next few years, Alan would represent one of the most iconic performers of our time. Of course, the role came with its quirks.

Alan continues: “My partner at the time, Chris Poole and I were in a very small office in Charlotte Street, and even though we had some great clients the entire operation was in one room.

“Prince was very shy, he was not a very chatty person. And one of his prerequisites was that he insisted that we had a phone installed for his use.

“It was pre-mobiles, so it was a bigger deal to go to Telecom and get a phone installed, and you paid for the line. It just sat there for weeks.

“We were never allowed to use it, and nobody else was given the number. Only Prince had the number. Whenever he wanted to call, he knew he could get straight through, and wouldn’t have to talk to anybody else.”

Press events were equally as unusual – and Alan’s first face-to-face encounter with the singer wasn’t as direct as his usual interactions with new clients.

“I was given the task to take 10 journalists to Rotterdam, where we were told Prince was going to appear at a club,” he says.

“He was the biggest thing in the universe at that moment. I stood there in this half empty club with journalists including the Mirror’s 3am team for one hour, then two hours, and I had to keep saying: 'He’ll be along in a minute.’

“I had Fleet Street’s finest – the most powerful columnists in the UK – what’s going to happen? It was pre-mobile, so there was no texts from management - we were just stuck there.

“It got to 4/5 o'clock in the morning, then there was a kerfuffle, and Prince comes upstairs with his manager and I was taken over to have a conversation with him about whether or not he’s going to perform, and whether the club is good enough for him, and who this mob is with me at the bar.

“He was a few feet away from me. The manager was on my left, one foot away from me. Prince addressed all the questions to the manager, who then asked them to me. I answered the manager, who then told Prince what I’d said.

“This thing went on for about 10/15 minutes – the whole conversation. The manager was just repeating it: 'Alan says there are 10 journalists here, and they want to review the concert.'”

Alan has nothing but fond memories of the superstar, and heralds his former client as a “genius”.

“Prince was a very gentle, soft spoken, and a nice person to deal with. He’s just shy, he really was shy. It was really extraordinary for someone so flamboyant, such an amazing performer to be so quiet one-on-one. You could hardly hear his voice at times.

“He broke the rules racially, sexually, musically and business wise. This word 'genius’ is overused, but it definitely applied to this man.

“All his approach was a few hundred years ahead. You had the record industry dispute and him painting slave on his face.

“He was a business pioneer, and now all artists expect to own their catalogue and have a control over their careers. To a degree, they need to thank Prince.”

Newt Scamander is on the Aspergers/Autism Spectrum

reblog if you agree

anonymous asked:

I'm sorry if I'm clueless and not looking hard enough but how do we know he's only doing four interviews? Or what seems to be. Thanks, have a great day!

That’s what Scott Mills and Nick Grimshaw said this morning on BBCR1.

Scott:  You don’t really hear him talk very often, do you? In fact, from what I’ve heard he’s not even doing many interviews. He’s doing, like, I think, four or five interviews around the world, and one of those is with you.

Nick:  Yeah, he’s doing a lot. He’s only doing Saturday Night Live, um, and he’s doing some other stuff in America, and us, on Friday.

So “four or five” may not be exact, it could be six, but it’s definitely limited, which is fantastic. Most of us that thought his album would be after Dunkirk’s premiere were concerned about overexposure if it dropped before, but that seems to have been taken well into account. 

Now, not only do we get better, longer interviews with people Harry is comfortable with, we don’t get dozens of 10 minute interviews with people who ask the exact same things over and over and focus on his hair or his “ex-gf’s” or “what do you look for in a girl?” or stuff like that.

Not that we won’t get hair or gf questions, I don’t think we’re that lucky, but they won’t be the primary focus of the interview, thank god.

2

Today I saw my favorite artist, milo, perform live in Minneapolis and it was a trip from start to finish. So it was in a little festival kind of setting, 7 artists played over about 6 and a half hours with milo going second to last. The crowd was a little fatigued by the time he got up but I and his other fans woke right the fuck back up when he got on stage. He played a few songs I new and a few I didn’t (I think from his new album that comes out soonish??) and it was fantastic. 

Then he started deliberately getting feedback on his mic. Maybe he was just being silly, but because of what I know about milo and of what happened after I think this had more to do with a ‘what is music?’ experimentation. After all, those are the sounds that he, the musician, is choosing to make so doesn’t that make feedback, usually considered a mistake to be avoided, his music? Kinda John Cage, very much milo’s style.

Then they muted him. Not just the mic that was feeding back but his beats and the mics of the others performing with him, and they refused to turn them on because he was playing with feedback. So milo gives this killer speech to the sound guy, and I only caught some of it on video so I’m working from memory here, saying something like ‘the sound guy is the arbiter of music. This is my show, why did you invite me then censor me?’ I am not even coming close to giving it justice though, it was kinda jaw dropping, and that’s why I think the feedback had more meaning than just being silly. Hell, if I am right about that then the sound guy basically proved the artistic statement for him. Then, after they still wouldn’t give him any sound, he packed up and walked off stage.

Some of the crowd was a little mad that they didn’t get a full show, but most of them were on milo’s side. He was standing by his car packing up and selling merch, so I walked over to talk to him. I shook his hand, rambled about artistic integrity, and gushed about being a huge fan. Dude then apologized to me for not getting a full show. He was so cool and humble about the whole thing, he just wasn’t willing to compromise his art. And ya know what? I think he did the right thing. If he didn’t do those weird experimental things then he wouldn’t really be milo anymore. He took a picture with me and I bought a tape, both to support him as an artist and because there was no way in hell I would walk away from that without some kind of souvenir.

So yeah, part of me is the slightest bit bummed that I didn’t get to see a full milo show, but most of me finds great value in seeing that speech, and having that conversation with him. That show was truly one of a kind as a result (for real that speech was amazing) and I’ll just have to make sure to catch a full show next time he’s in town. As if I wasn’t going to do that anyways.

And @brucewavy if you’re reading this, never compromise. You absolutely did the right thing and it was inspirational as fuck. Your art is worth the clashes with those who oppose it.

TLDR: milo is a badass and I’m even more in love with him and his art than I already was. Unforgettable