theater producer

To those in theater positions

Me and my friend are soon to be bringing our show to Off-Broadway!

As our show is about bringing together people from different paths of life, we have decided to take to tumblr to fill our crew positions. If you have an interest of being in the crew of an Off-Broadway, touring, and hopefully Broadway show, fill out this form below!

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdS1TMdmjAyI05_1g-PPuD5ossIjejPyTLnU-BbaHI_faoAKA/viewform

If you are an actor/actress or dancer, you can email facingtheoddsmusical@gmail.com to be the first to receive information about casting and audition information.

“Kong: Skull Island” Stomps Past Half A Billion at the Worldwide Box Office

(April 6, 2017 – Burbank, CA) – Warner Bros. Pictures, Legendary Pictures and Tencent Pictures’ global blockbuster “Kong: Skull Island” has crossed the $500 million mark at the worldwide box office, it was announced today by Sue Kroll, President of Worldwide Marketing and Distribution, Warner Bros. Pictures, and Mary Parent, Vice Chairman, Worldwide Production for Legendary.

The acclaimed action adventure—certified Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes—opened at the top of the domestic box office on March 10, and has grossed more than $150 million, and climbing.

Internationally, “Kong: Skull Island” was released day-and-date in 65 markets, including Vietnam, one of the movie’s primary filming locations, where it has become the highest-grossing picture of all time.  Hugely successful openings followed in Japan, as well as China.   Continuing to demonstrate broad appeal that transcends borders, “Kong: Skull Island” has earned more than $358.7 million in the international marketplace, for a combined worldwide total of approximately $509 million.

In China, where “Kong: Skull Island” is being distributed directly by Wanda-owned Legendary, the film is expected to become one of the top 10 English-language releases of all time.

In making the announcement, Kroll stated, “‘Kong: Skull Island’ has taken audiences and critics on a thrilling ride, resulting in strong word-of-mouth and repeat business.  These tremendous results speak not only to the powerful legacy of this mythic icon but also the crowd-pleasing monster movie director Jordan Vogt-Roberts, his cast and fellow filmmakers have delivered.  We congratulate them and our partners at Legendary Pictures and Tencent Pictures on reaching this benchmark.”

Added Parent, “‘Kong’ reaching this global milestone is fantastic news for the movie.  We’re also thrilled to have another firmly established cornerstone in our goal of creating a Monsterverse that will bring some of the world’s most iconic creatures back to the big screen with a contemporary style that resonates with moviegoers across the globe.  The film’s success to date in China also underscores Wanda and Legendary’s commitment to delivering content that will drive moviegoers across the region to the theater.”

From the producers of “Godzilla” comes “Kong: Skull Island,” a compelling, original adventure directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts (“The Kings of Summer”).  The film tells the story of a diverse team of scientists, soldiers and adventurers uniting to explore a mythical, uncharted island in the Pacific, as dangerous as it is beautiful.  Cut off from everything they know, the team ventures into the domain of the mighty Kong, igniting the ultimate battle between man and nature.  As their mission of discovery becomes one of survival, they must fight to escape a primal Eden in which humanity does not belong.

Source: WB

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♥ it’s time to spread your podcast pallet ♥

We are almost done with January! We’re almost done with the first month of the new year and we are still listening, protesting, talking, and surviving. We still have so much more to accomplish and today’s podcasts may help rekindle that creative spark we all desperately need. 

So it’s time to tune into creepy stations, dig around that dusty old library, and keep things campy for flavor. Hopefully this combination of new finds will get us all through February until the welcoming embrace of spring.

Looking for something fresh to please that sudden thirst for audio storytelling? Look no further as PodCake has six more podcasts you’ll certainly love.

1. Point Mystic 

Each year thousands of unexplained events occur. We know these accounts to be true. Behind that truth lies the real stories — life-changing and sometimes frightening. My name is Christopher Reynaga. From the shores of Point Mystic, come with me in search of the stories behind the magic, the mystery, and the unexplained.

Magic and mystery collide in Point Mystic, the cult radio show that should be a pleasant pick for the coming chills of the year. Be it a “Dragonscale” epidemic or little white rabbits, these stories are bound to entrance you one way or another.

Point Mystic has only a few episodes under it’s belt at the moment, though I’m sure they would love to welcome you down it’s rabbit hole. So get curious and get on point with this pick.

2. Wooden Overcoats

On the overlooked Channel Island of Piffling, obstinate undertaker Rudyard Funn runs his family’s failing funeral parlor. But when new and sexy undertaker Eric Chapman sets up shop across the square and becomes an immediate sensation, Rudyard realizes he’ll have to take drastic steps to stay in business.

Hello there you Piffling Islander! Got a taste for British black comedy? Well, Wooden Overcoats may or may not be a familiar title among you podcast fanatics. This is most definitely a must-listen for those looking for excellent comedic timing, charm, and a talented cast voicing a colorful cast of characters. 

Follow the misadventures of Rudyard and friends and family and rivals as he goes through any means to keep himself afloat and his coffins full. Who says death always has to be a downer? 

3.  Synesthesia Theatre 

Stories you watch with your ears. A professionally-produced full-cast audio drama podcast presenting 8-12 part serials across a variety of genre and story types, featuring some of Chicago’s premier vocal talent.

In this audio movie theater experience produced by the talented voices of Chicago theater comes Synesthesia Theatre. In this serial anthology podcast we are granted a variety of amazing tales straight from the source of Burning Brigid Media.  

Synesthesia effortlessly bounces from theme to genre as it pulls of steampunk western one day and cyberpunk western the next, pulling off each idea with great new characters and fresh lore. Variety is the spice of life and the heart of this great audio drama.

4. The Adventures of MechaBetty 

Just a small town girl turned giant cyborg to fight off an alien invasion.

For audio drama fans who think their podcasts could use more robot girls, TitanKore has you covered. In this campy old-style radio drama that meshes the future with 50′s style camp, MechaBetty is delightfully action packed and bursting with creativity. 

Stylized to a T to make something both humorous and oddly heartwarming, MechaBetty is something a little different to warm up the last few days of winter. MechaBetty is wonderfully weird and plenty aware of it so it’s a better time than ever to join the fun.

5. Dark Tome

What if there was a book that literally opened up doorways to other worlds? Where would it lead, and could you handle what you found on the other side? Cassie, a wayward teen, is about to find out. One day, after she wraps up community service at a local hospital, she stumbles out of the basement of a spooky bookshop and into a story set on a devil’s staircase in a remote Italian village. 

Multidimensional books, anyone? I’m glad I already have your attention. If you’re looking for solid and sometimes strange storytelling, Dark Tome has story after story to keep you coming back down its staircase. 

Dark Tome comes complete with excellent voice acting, great characters, and a number of equally cool and creepy tales told by the likes of Joe Hill and Catherine Valente. These contemporary tales from around the world are sure to keep you entertained. 

6. The Magnus Archives 

Make your statement, face your fear. A weekly horror fiction podcast examining what lurks in the archives of the Magnus Institute, an organisation dedicated to researching the esoteric and the weird. Join Jonathan Sims as he explores the archive, but be be warned, as he looks into its depths something starts to look back… 

Creepy will always be cool when it comes to audio drama. There’s never enough creepy tales to keep your skin crawling and The Magnus Institute has plenty to spare. Eerie and atmospheric with a touch of mystery, join Jonathan Sims as we follow him through each and every cryptic case number.

Highly atmospheric with stellar storytelling, The Rusty Quill prepared a compelling and creative show made through good old elbow grease…and really good editing. 

now, get to listening.

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We have the first newly picked up broadcast series from Pilot Season 2017. NBC has given two drama pilots — Rise, from former Friday Night Lights showrunner Jason Katims and Hamilton producer Jeffrey Seller; and For God & Country, from writer Dean Georgaris — series orders. They come two weeks after the two pilots — both from sibling studio Universal Television — received permission by the network to start making firm offers to writers. NBC traditionally kicks off the new series pickups as it is the first broadcast network to present its 2017-18 schedule on Monday morning of upfront week.

Rise (fka Drama High), starring How I Met Your Mother‘s Josh Radnor, has been a very early favorite at NBC, which aired the Broadway-themed drama Smash and launched an annual live musical franchise under chairman Bob Greenblatt, a long-time musical theater buff, producer and investor.

Written by Katims, Rise was inspired by the story of groundbreaking high school drama teacher Lou Volpe as chronicled in the book Drama High. In the hourlong project, when dedicated teacher and family man Lou Mazzuchelli (Radnor) sheds his own self-doubt and takes over the school’s lackluster theater department, he galvanizes not only the faculty and students but the entire working-class town.

The series stars Radnor, Rosie Perez and Marley Shelton, with a young cast featuring Moana star Auli’i Cravalho. Damon J. Gillespie, Amy Forsyth, Rarmian Newton, Ted Sutherland, Casey Johnson, Taylor Richardson, Joe Tippett and Shirley Rumierk also-co-star, while Stranger Things standout Shannon Purser (aka Barb) has a recurring role. Katims and Michelle Lee executive produce via True Jack Productions. Seller and Flody Suarez also executive produce via Seller Suarez Productions. Mike Cahill is director/executive producer.

(source - Deadline.com)

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Thank you so much to everybody who submitted stories and made this video possible!

Please reblog and share this! It would also be awesome if you guys went and subscribed to my channel. I make new videos every Friday.

CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWqiLOG3KGH7vyE-A7yCAYw

anonymous asked:

HI I'M P NEW TO THE ANIME LIFE, WHAT THE FUCK IS AN OVA

Hello my bean, I’m going to do a summary for you from this Wikipedia article: 

Original Video Animation, abbreviated as OVA, are animated films and series made for release in home video formats without prior showings on television or in theaters. Producers make other OVA releases as sequels, side stories, music-video collections, or bonus episodes.

OVA titles generally have a much higher budget than a television series; therefore the technical quality of animation can generally surpass that in television series; occasionally it even equals that of animated movies.

Episode length varies from title to title: each episode may run from a few minutes to two hours or more. An episode length of 30 minutes occurs quite commonly, but no standard length exists. 

OVA titles have a reputation for the detailed plots and character development which can result from the greater creative freedom offered to writers and directors in comparison with other formats. This also allows for animated adaptations of manga to reflect their source material more faithfully. Since OVA episodes and series have no fixed conventional length, OVA directors can use however much time they like to tell the story. Time becomes available for significant background, character, and plot development. In the same way, no pressure exists to produce “filler content” to extend a short plot into a full television series.

note: this is a general explanation of what an OVA is. In Haikyuu case, the OVAs were used to show us completely original parts of the story, that weren't narrated in the manga. 

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Lin-Manuel Miranda is the shit tho… read on:

“I begin with an apology.

I am the writer of Hamilton: An American Musical. Every word in the show—and there are over 22,000 words in the show—were chosen and put in a really specific order by me. So I am painfully aware that neither Philly nor the great state of Pennsylvania is mentioned in Hamilton, with the exception of ONE couplet in the song Hurricane, where Hamilton sings:

“I WROTE MY WAY OUT OF HELL

I WROTE MY WAY TO REVOLUTION,

I WAS LOUDER THAN THE CRACK IN THE BELL.”

That’s it! One blink and you miss it Liberty Bell reference!

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I am also painfully aware that this commencement address is being livestreamed and disseminated all over the world instantly. In fact, “painfully aware” is pretty much my default state. “Oh yeah, that’s Lin, he’s…PAINfully aware.”

So, with the eyes of the world and history on us all, I’d like to correct the record and point out that a few parts in Hamilton: An American the Musical actually took place in Pennsylvania.

The Battle of Monmouth, wherein General Charles Lee, in our show, “S’ed the Bed” and retreated against Washington’s orders. According to Lafayette, this was the only time he ever heard George Washington curse out loud. That’s right, the father of our country dropped his choicest profanity and F-bombs in Pennsylvania.

The Constitutional Convention, wherein Alexander Hamilton spoke extemporaneously for 6 hours in what is surely the most un-Tweet-able freestyle of all time, happened right here in Philly.

In fact, Alexander Hamilton lived at 79 South 3rd Street when he began his extramarital affair with Mariah Reynolds, creating the time-honored precedent of political sex scandals and mea culpas.

You guys, The Good Wife wouldn’t even EXIST if Hamilton hadn’t gotten the ball rolling on this dubious American tradition, right on South 3rd street, right near the Cosí.
Finally, I need to apologize on behalf of the historical Alexander Hamilton, because if he hadn’t sat down to dinner with James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, desperate for support for his financial plan, Philadelphia might well still be the U.S. Capitol.

Hamilton traded Philly away in the most significant backroom deal in American history. As the guy who plays Hamilton every night, let me get into character for a moment and say, “My bad, Philadelphia.” Thank you.

But take the long view, Motown Phillly. Who really won that deal in the end? Look at D.C: it’s synonymous with institutional dysfunction, partisan infighting and political gridlock. YOU are known as the birthplace of Louisa May Alcott, Rocky Balboa, Boyz II Men, Betsy Ross, Will Smith, Isaac Asimov, Tina Fey, Cheesesteaks, and you can have SCRAPPLE, SOFT PRETZELS, and Wawa HOAGIES WHENEVER YOU WANT.

YOU WIN, PHILLY. YOU WIN EVERY TIME. WATER ICE.

The simple truth is this: Every story you choose to tell, by necessity, omits others from the larger narrative. One could write five totally different musicals from Hamilton’s eventful, singular American life, without ever overlapping incidents. For every detail I chose to dramatize, there are ten I left out. I include King George at the expense of Ben Franklin. I dramatize Angelica Schuyler’s intelligence and heart at the expense of Benedict Arnold’s betrayal. James Madison and Hamilton were friends and political allies, but their personal and political fallout occurs right on our act break, during intermission. My goal is to give you as much as an evening as musical entertainment can provide, and have you on your way at home slightly before Les Mis lets out next door.

This act of choosing—the stories we tell versus the stories we leave out—will reverberate across the rest of your life. Don’t believe me? Think about how you celebrated this senior week, and contrast that with the version you shared with the parents and grandparents sitting behind you.

Penn, don’t front. You’re a Playboy Magazine ranked Party school—you KNOW you did things this week that you’re never mentioning again. I know what you did this summer!
I’m going to tell you a story from my twenties today—a story I’ve never told in public before. I’ll tell you two stories actually. It’s my hope that it’ll be of use to you as you stare down the quarter life marker.

I am 20 years old, finishing my sophomore year at Wesleyan, and my girlfriend of four and a half years is home from her semester abroad. I cannot wait to see her again—she is my first love. I dread seeing her again—I’ve grown into my life without her. In her absence, with time and angst to spare, I have developed the first draft of my first full-length musical, an 80-minute one-act called In The Heights. I have also developed a blinding pain in my right shoulder, which I can’t seem to stop cracking. My girlfriend comes home. I am so happy to see her, even as my shoulder worsens. My mother takes me to a back specialist, ranked in New York Magazine, so you know he’s good.

He examines me, looks me dead in the eyes, and says, “There’s nothing wrong with your back. There will be if you keep cracking it, but what you have a nervous tic. Is there anything in your life that is causing you stress?” I burst into tears, in his office. He looks at me for a long time, as I’m crying, and get this—you’ll appreciate this Renee—he tells me the story of Giuseppe Verdi. A 19th century Italian composer of some note, who, in the space of a few short years, lost his wife and two young children to disease. He tells me that Verdi’s greatest works—Rigoletto, La Traviata—came not before, but after this season of Job, the darkest moments of his life. He looks me in the eyes and tells me, “You’re trying to avoid going through pain, or causing pain. I’m here to tell you that you’ll have to survive it if you want to be any kind of artist.”

I break up with my girlfriend that night.

I spend the summer in therapy. I tell a lot of stories I’ve never told before.

My father asks my mother, “What the hell kind of back doctor…Verdi? Really?”

I stop cracking my shoulder.

The story I had been telling myself—happy guy in a long-distance relationship with his high school sweetheart—was being physically rejected by my body via my shoulder. I’d never broken up with anyone before—in my head, I was a “good guy,” and “good guys” don’t break up with their significant others when one of them goes off to study abroad. I was trying to fit my life into a romantic narrative that was increasingly at odds with how I really felt. In retrospect, we both were.

What about her story? Well, it’s not mine to tell, but I can share this much: she began dating one of her good friends the following year of college. Fast-forward to present day: She is happily married to that same good friend, with two beautiful kids. In her story, I am not the angsty, shoulder-cracking tortured artist. I’m the obstacle in the way of the real love story. For you Office fans: They’re Jim and Pam, and I’m Roy.

Story #2: I am out of college, I am 23 years old, and Tommy Kail and I are meeting with a veteran theater producer. To pay rent I am a professional substitute teacher: at my old high school. Tommy is Audra McDonald’s assistant. Tommy is directing In The Heights, and with his genius brain in my corner, my 80-minute one-act is now two acts. This big deal theater producer has seen a reading we put on in the basement of The Drama Book Shop in mid-Manhattan, and he is giving us his thoughts. We hang on his every word, this is a big deal theater producer, and we are kids, desperate to get our show on. We are discussing the character of Nina Rosario, home from her first year at Stanford, the first in her family to go to college.

The big deal theater producer says:

“Now I know in your version Nina’s coming home with a secret from her parents: she’s lost her scholarship. The song is great, the actress is great. What I’m bumping up against, fellas, is that this doesn’t feel high STAKES enough. Scholarship? Big deal. What if she’s pregnant? What if her boyfriend at school hit her? What if she got caught with drugs? It doesn’t have to be any of those things, you’re the writer—but do you see what I’m getting at guys, a way to ramp up the stakes of your story?”

I resist the urge to crack my shoulder.

We get through the meeting and Tommy and I, again alone, look at each other. He knows what I’m going to say before I say it.

“Pregnant—“

“I know.”

“Nina on drugs—“

“I was there.”

“But he wants to put our show up.”
Tommy looks at me.

“That’s not the story you want to tell and that’s not the show I want to direct. There are ways to raise the stakes that are not THAT. We’ll just keep working.”

If I could get in a time machine and watch any point in my life, it would be this moment. The moment where Tommy Kail looked at uncertain, frazzled me, desperate for a production and a life in this business, tempted, and said no for us. I keep subbing, he continues working for Audra, we keep working on In The Heights for five years until we find the right producers in Jill Furman and Kevin McCollum and Jeffrey Seller. Until Philly native Quiara Hudes becomes my co-writer and reframes our show around a community instead of a love triangle. Until Alex Lacamoire and Bill Sherman take my songs and made them come to life through their orchestrations. It will be another five years before Heights reaches Broadway, exactly as we intended it.

And then the good part: Nina’s story that we fought to tell, keeps coming back around in my life. It comes around in letters, or in the countless young men and women who find me on the subway or on college campuses and take my hand and say, “You don’t understand. I was the first in my family to go to college, when I felt out of place like I was drowning I listened to “Breathe,” Nina’s song, and it got me through.” And I think to myself as these strangers tell me their Nina stories, “I do understand. And that sounds pretty high stakes to me.”

I know that many of you made miracles happen to get to this day. I know that parents and grandparents and aunts and uncles and family behind you made miracles happen to be here. I know because my family made miracles happen for me to be standing here talking to you, telling stories.

Your stories are essential. Don’t believe me?

In a year when politicians traffic in anti-immigrant rhetoric, there is also a Broadway musical reminding us that a broke, orphan immigrant from the West Indies built our financial system. A story that reminds us that since the beginning of the great unfinished symphony that is our American experiment, time and time again, immigrants get the job done.

My dear, terrified graduates—you are about to enter the most uncertain and thrilling period of your lives.

The stories you are about to live are the ones you will be telling your children and grandchildren and therapists.

They are the temp gigs and internships before you find your passion.

They are the cities you live in before the opportunity of a lifetime pops up halfway across the world.

They are the relationships in which you hang on for dear life even as your shoulder cracks in protest.

They are the times you say no to the good opportunities so you can say yes to the best opportunities.

They are what Verdi survived to bring us La Traviata.

They are the stories in which you figure out who you are.

There will be moments you remember and whole years you forget.

There will be times when you are Roy and times when you are Jim and Pam.

There will be blind alleys and one-night wonders and soul-crushing jobs and wake-up calls and crises of confidence and moments of transcendence when you are walking down the street and someone will thank you for telling your story because it resonated with their own.

I feel so honored to be a detail, a minor character in the story of your graduation day.

I feel so honored to bear witness to the beginning of your next chapter.

I’m painfully aware of what’s at stake.

I can’t wait to see how it turns out.

Thank you and congratulations to the Class of 2016.”

So apparently this is a thing I’m doing now.  More of the Overwatch thing where bad guys tried to brainwash Soldier: 76 into a human weapon except they did a bad job, so Reaper decides to take matters into his own hands.

Prequel is here.

Where am I going with this?  Why is Reaper trying to be helpful?  Is Jack really in any way recoverable?  Those are all good questions!  I’ll get back to you if I figure them out.


When Gabriel was 12, he got a kitten.

Technically he found a kitten. It was crying under a dumpster, sick from something he never did figure out.  It was about two months old, not tiny anymore, but the poor little thing had looked and sounded so pitiful that he couldn’t bear to leave it there.

At 12, he was old enough to understand that alley cats weren’t tame, but too young to have patience for it.  He’d chased the thing around, trying to pet her and hold her to show her he was friendly.  Unsurprisingly, it didn’t go well.  The little girl did fall in love with his older sister, though.  She always had a way with small scared things.  Took the cat with her when she moved away for college.

That saved her life.  She wasn’t in LA when the omnics tore up the city.  Last he checked up on her, she was out near Whitefish, doing field biology in Glacier.  The cat’s been gone for years; kidney failure when she was 11.  She never did warm up to him.

Meanwhile, Gabriel hasn’t gotten any better with small scared things.

On the bright side, Jack is not in any sense small.

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