the-grifters

wannabanauthor  asked:

Hi there! I love your blog! I've seen you mention a few TV shows and movies for research, and I was wondering what your opinion is on the show Leverage and it's accuracy for social engineering in potentially violent situations. I remember one character saying that "Thieves look for entrances, but grifters create them." They'll often use approaches like this to avoid violence.

If the question is: can you use social engineering in order to defuse or avoid violent situations? The answer is yes.

Grifters are conmen, and like spies, they don’t want to fight unless it is absolutely necessary. Whether they can fight or know how isn’t really the point: combat makes messes, big messes, and draws the kind of attention they don’t want/can’t afford.

As for the line, “thieves look for entrances, but grifters create them” the point of it is that grifters focus on people as the exploitative aspect to get what they want. After all, it doesn’t matter how good your security system is if your infiltrator is expected to be there. When someone opens the door for them, they didn’t have to break in.

It is worth pointing out though, being able to stop, defuse, avoid, or redirect violence via social engineering (especially when the character is the target) is very difficult and requires someone who excels at rapidly changing their story/manipulating under life or death pressure while also maintaining their consistency/re-establishing their innocence/regaining their target’s trust.

That’s masterclass social engineering. The average person, even the average grifter can’t do it. When we see Nate Ford, Sophie Devereaux, or Michael Westen on Burn Notice socially engineer their way out of potentially explosive and violent scenarios, we’re supposed to understand this level of manipulation is very difficult. You need a solid ability to read people, predict their behavior patterns, understand how to shift your role so you suddenly seem trustworthy, confuse them, and then redirect their anger somewhere away from you.

You can see another variant of this kind of social engineering on display in The Negotiator. Samuel L. Jackson’s character is a hostage negotiator. Deliberately maneuvering a man who’s taken a child captive around his apartment so he can be taken out. You can see him joking with the target, gaining his trust, distracting him, and guiding him off topic until he’s in a position to be neutralized.

The Grifter is not a fighter, they are a talker and their trick is getting people to move however they want. A skilled grifter can slip in, turn the best of friends against each other, and walk away without a care. Grifters don’t punch. They trick other people into doing the punching for them. When sitting down to write a Grifter, remember: their first instinct is getting others to act in their place, to create the openings they need, and be their fall guy.

On the whole, I’ve liked Leverage ever since the episode where Eliot pointed out that guns are ranged weapons, and the most common mistake people make is giving up the distance advantage by getting in too close. However, I’ve only watched the first season. I liked what I saw, it’s an enjoyable caper show in a similar vein to The Equalizer, Person of Interest, or Ocean’s Eleven. Not quite in there with the original Law & Order when it comes to accuracy (in this case for cops) but certainly better than White Collar, which uses similar techniques (though never, ever pay attention to White Collar’s usage of the FBI… ever). The X-Files, meanwhile, fudges a bit but it’s pretty good when you’re wanting to get a grasp of the FBI’s culture and what happens to someone who doesn’t come from a military/law enforcement background.

Of course, the patient zero for these types of shows is the original Mission: Impossible. The television show, not the Tom Cruise movies. Mission: Impossible is all about flipping people and manipulating them into positions to do what you want. The A-Team is its slightly more pulpy counterpart, but its a similar (though far less subtle) deal.

On the whole, Leverage tends to explain itself better, which is helpful when you’re trying to learn or take techniques from a television show rather than just absorb.

The reason why I often suggest Burn Notice and Spy Game is not necessarily just because they’re good, but also because they teach. The narrator on Burn Notice, especially in the first season will offer up a lot of helpful/beginner tradecraft for a variety of situations. This, ultimately, will help you more for taking pieces and creating your own characters than a show that’s trying for smoke and mirrors like White Collar. The same situation is there with Spy Game, where Robert Redford’s character is teaching Brad Pitt’s on how to be a spy. Ultimately, more helpful in the long run than just watching The Recruit. The Michael Mann films like Heat and Collateral are exceptionally good for learning tradecraft, but you have to know that’s what you’re watching/looking for. You’ll learn more by watching them together, rather than separately. The Borne Identity novels are also very good at showing the tradecraft, while the Le Carre ones tend to be a little more hit and miss.

When you’re new, you want sources that are free with their information. Who are good at getting you to think, to take what you’re seeing and apply it to new settings. You may not ever figure out how to build a car bomb, but learning about how the thought process of a spy, criminal, or conman works will serve you better for your writing than a hundred other movies that only show.

After you’ve drawn back the curtain then you can turn to those other shows, novels, and narratives with new eyes. Once you see what they’re doing, how they’re doing it, and why when they don’t explain you’ll get more out of those other sources than you did before.

When you’re watching a well put together show like Leverage, start questioning character motivations. Not just whether the social engineering there works, but why the characters are choosing to go that route or which routes they prefer. Leverage gives you five characters with different specialties, four thieves and the guy who made a career catching them. They all think in different ways and have different approaches when it comes to problem solving. Leverage offers up a heist per episode, so you have lots of opportunities to see the characters in action. Evaluate their problem solving methods and you’ll come away with more than just questioning whether or not it works.

How and Why.

Then, go find a good video on YouTube where a professional magician explains pickpocketing. It’s the art of misdirection.

Once you understand basic theoretical underpinnings (whether or not you could ever actually pull the real thing off) then you can apply it to many different situations in a fictional context.

When it comes back to applying this to the combat arts, learning to see the big picture is the first major difference between trained and untrained. The untrained only copy surface level, singular techniques, while trained delves deeper to understand how these techniques work together.

My advice for when you’re wanting to pick and choose television shows for accuracy is to check who their consultants are/were, and what experts in the show’s chosen field say about it. That doesn’t always guarantee accuracy, but it will help you flip through the rave reviews.

If you want to watch more fun shows with Timothy Hutton or just like detective shows, I recommend Nero Wolfe.

-Michi

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron. Every contribution helps keep us online, and writing. If you already are a Patron, thank you.

This vacation double standard, a coded dog whistle for ‘lazy black guy’, is the core of GOP populism.

$40,000,000/month for the four years = $1,920,000,000.

That’s TWO BILLION vs $87 million. The GOP silence is deafening.

Donald and Melania are grifters.

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron. Every contribution helps keep us online, and writing. If you already are a Patron, thank you.

5

The rich and powerful, they take what they want. We steal it back for you. Sometimes bad guys make the best good guys. We provide… leverage.

Leverage AU: Iris West finds herself working with people she once tried to help put away… but with their combined skills, they’re a greater force for good than she could have ever imagined.

{image: five gifs of various characters from the DCTV Universe overlayed with white text that states their role on the five-person team. the first gif shows John Diggle circling with his fighting opponent with a smile on his face and the word ‘HITTER’. the second gif shows Cisco Ramon rolling from one computer monitor to the next and the word ‘HACKER’. the third gif shows Cynthia Reynolds turning and giving someone a smile, her hair spinning behind her and the word ‘GRIFTER’. the fourth gif shows Leonard Snart giving a measured look from one side to another with the word ‘THIEF.’ the final gifs shows Iris West holding folders and having an intense conversation with the word ‘MASTERMIND’.}

10

“What is it about Annette Bening’s singular screen persona that has drawn her to characters of a certain severity? One of the most discerning and revered actors in Hollywood, her public persona radiates with soft-spoken, good-humoured charm – and yet what stands out most prominently from her eclectic film career is the robust gallery of visceral, vinegary and headstrong characters who are unendingly encouraged to change their ways by those behind and in front of the camera.” — Matthew Eng

Read: In praise of Annette Bening’s difficult women

YOI Fan Rec Friday

Thank you for all your recs this week! Since I will be away for two weeks after June 17th, please send in ALL your recs (the more the better haha!) so I can pre-make them before I leave :) Thank you!!

Rec’d by anonymous:
The Last Dancer by StarryKnight94, Teen, 18k (WIP)
In which Victor is the chosen one, a dancer gifted with the powers of the Ice Goddess to protect her people at any cost. Amid the rising threat of the Fire God, Yuuri wants nothing more than to protect him. But when Yuuri awakens to a great power himself and goes to meet his idol, will Victor welcome his support or does a hidden darkness lurk behind that beautiful facade?

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Dissonance by Mats, Explicit, 32k (WIP)
Yuuri takes it for granted that Viktor will always meet him where he is. So when his coach and lifelong idol suddenly plants a very public kiss on him at the Cup of China, Yuuri takes it as a signal that his and Viktor’s relationship is about to undergo a major (and welcomed) change. But he may be wrong, and that might change everything, too.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Dark Angel of Mine by vanialex81, Teen, 40k (WIP)
When Yuuri’s heavenly light manages to catch the attention of the demon lord Viktor, Yuuri will learn that the demon will stop at nothing to claim him. Something that starts as desire turns into an emotion that Viktor had not foreseen. To what lengthens will he go to have the angel?

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
why am i still here? by OedipusOctopus, Teen, 22k (WIP)
Yuuri finds himself in his fifth year at university, dreading taking a freshman level math course. He imagines his Russian TA to be a curmudgeonly hardass, only to find he’s a total hottie! Yuuri isn’t suave, attractive, or exceptional in any way, but somehow Victor takes a liking to him.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Between Periods by caitwritesstuff, Mature, 9k (WIP)
Yuuri is a history teacher out of a job due to recent cut backs. It just so happens that Phichit works at a school that’s needs a new history teacher. In walks Victor Nikiforov, the undeniably beautiful yet eccentric literature teacher from across the hall with a bit of an obsession with Russian lit and a certain adorable history teacher.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
What Lies Beneath Our Feet by HQ_Wingster, Gen, 19k (WIP)
At the YoI Farm, all animals are given the happiness that they deserve. When ex-battery chicken, Yuuri, comes to the farm one day after being set free, he relearns what it means to be a happy animal with a life ahead of him.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by @stevietomybuck :
winners in a losing game by xylophones, Teen, 19k
Don’t believe the rumors, international popstar Viktor Nikiforov is totally not using his new album as an excuse to flirt with the cute dancer that stole his heart last year.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
To Boldly Go by xylophones, Teen, 29k
A year in the life of badass science officer Yuuri Katsuki, Captain Viktor “Team Mom” Nikiforov, and simultaneously the best crew and worst crew in Starfleet history.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Snow & Ashes by natiwati, Mature, 5.4k (WIP)
They stand in silence, and Yuuri isn’t brave enough to ask him for his name, strike up any form of conversation. They gaze at the moon above together, two waves pulled by its astounding gravity. And when he finally gleans the courage to part his lips and suck in a breath to inquire, the man steps on his cigarette, extinguishing it, and leaves. Yuuri takes another drag, pretending not to feel so disappointed.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
High-Flying, Adored by terra_incognita, Gen, 26k
Being a superhero is hard. It’s even harder when you’re desperately in love with the most famous figure skater in the world, who never seems to notice you. Of course it doesn’t help that he’s a superhero too–and he’s head over heels for your alter-ego.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by @blusocket :
marker in the sand by faelicy, Teen, 10k
Victor has always been with Yuuri. No one understands the consequences better than Yuuri himself.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
On (Online and Offline) Love by AlexWSpark, Mature, 32k
In which Yuuri and Victor are gamers, head over heels for each other, and hoping to one day come face-to-face. Of course, when two whipped, adorable fluff-balls are involved, shenanigans ensue…

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Law Firm of Katsuki, Nikiforov & Chulanont by nerdlife4eva, Not Rated, 12k (WIP)
Yuuri, Victor, and Phichit are long-time friends who decide to form their own law firm. The trio has found remarkably success, despite the constant bickering between Yuuri and Victor. When the sexual tension between these two best friends erupts, bringing them crashing together in a drunken one-night stand, the fate of their new firm becomes uncertain.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
let’s go steal an ice rink by FullmetalChords, Mature, 28k (WIP)
That one AU where Yuuri is a grifter, Victor is a criminal mastermind, and somehow they end up saving the world together. Also featuring catburglar Yuri, hitter Otabek, and hacker Phichit.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Setting Sun by LittleLostStar, Explicit, 66k (WIP)
Just before he skates at the Hot Springs On Ice, Yuuri receives a photo of his drunken GPF banquet antics; consumed with humiliation over a night he can’t remember, he loses the competition. Victor goes back to Russia with Yurio, and Yakov comes to train Yuuri in Japan. One night, frustrated and miserable, Yuuri posts some personally relevant song lyrics on Instagram—and wakes up the next morning to find that Victor has posted lyrics that seem to be a reply.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Only You by quesadiaz, Teen, 59k (WIP)
In the year 2021, Victor Nikiforov, retired professional figure skater and Number One Husband, steps into a taxi to make his way home from the grocery store, arm full of vegetables and fruits to bring home to his beautiful husband and loyal old dog. A sharp sound and a blur of color is the only warning before Victor wakes up in the year 2016, sitting in a first class seat on an ascending airplane headed for Fukuoka, Japan.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Katsudon for Gold by cROAissant (RoamingShadow), Gen, 4.5k
Somewhere along the road, “I might never like you” morphed into “I would die for this child”, and Yuri Plisetsky would be six feet under before Victor fucking Nikiforov would lay his thirsty hands on his precious student.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Void by copperwings, Teen, 14k
When Yuuri is discovered to be Void and his home town turns against him, he escapes into the world of figure skating. On the ice he can play the role of anyone and not be restricted by what he actually is, but off the ice it’s a constant battle of trying to hide his true nature from the world.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by @mmeishi :
Wound Up by Temptalia, Explicit, 24k (WIP)
Victor Nikiforov, face of popular idol group Agape, is at the top of his career, but a low point in his life. His reckless and sometimes self-destructive tendencies cause endless worry for his fellow group members: Yurio, Chris, and Otabek. When the time comes to go in a sexy new direction for the group’s image, Yuuri Katsuki lands an audition and knocks Victor off of his feet. However, Victor has a strange feeling he’s met Yuuri somewhere before.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Ah, deceit. by Nikiforlove, Gen, 11k (WIP)
Viktor is the head of the Russian Mafia, charming, sleek and confident. He’s a very hasty man, and he prefers fieldwork over office work, and Yakov’s pissed. Surprise, surprise! Yakov signed a contract with the JP Mafia without Viktor’s consent, to get him a consigliere who would maybe, make up for what Viktor lacks. Oh boy, Viktor is pissed, he’s fuming. Damn, all he wanted was to go on a date with that bespectacled cutie he met the other day at the cafe.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
A Tale Carved on Ice by Adora, Teen, 2.6k
A bittersweet tale about the magic we lost and the one we found again.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Bottle Me Your Smile by Ncj700, Not Rated, 35k (WIP)
In a tiny village on the edge of the kingdom, Yuuri Katsuki – common as mud Pharmakeia owner – embarks on a goal to achieve a childhood goal. With the help of the world’s greatest magical, and a missing potion ingridient, he will achieve it.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
The Stars Incline Us, They Do Not Bind Us by AuraJenkins, Gen, 4.4k
Yuuri has always known that he was different, he was fairly sure that being born with the ability to see everyone’s red strings of fate, tying soulmates together, wasn’t normal. Stranger than this is the realisation that his string extends past the sky.


Thank you for all your recs! ₍₍ (̨̡ ‾᷄♡‾᷅ )̧̢ ₎₎

The amazing “YOI Fan Rec Friday” banner was created by @omgkatsudonplease! I love them a lot, check out their blog!

[Context: We’re playing Dusk City Outlaws, where the Judge plays the role of the GM]

Grifter: I’m going to wash the guard uniforms.

Judge: Okay, I think that just happens, you don’t need to roll–

Alchemist: Wait, I want to assist! Okay, as an alchemist, I’ve created a badass laundry detergent. It gets your whites whiter, your colors brighter, and it’s just the most kickass laundry detergent ever.

Boss: I get some of my goons and they just go to town on those dirty guard uniforms.

Grifter: And all this is happening like in a sports anime, just overdramatic shots and sprays of water and it looks amazing.