the-grifters

2

The rich and powerful, they take what they want.
We steal it back for you.
Sometimes bad guys make the best good guys.

We provide… “Leverage”.
Leverage
Design: CT

I love this and my little guys. Designing them took FOREVER but TOTALLY WORTH IT!!! All of them have something I am super-proud of. Elliot’s luxurious hair. Hardison’s orange soda. Sophie’s shoes. :DDD

Also YOU SHOULD TOTALLY WATCH THIS SHOW. Thanks @crinoline-gremlin for going on and on about it until I caved! <3

Honestly the scene in “The Stork Job” where Parker’s first instinct is to shield the bus full of orphans from machine gun fire with her body, as in full on turns her body TOWARDS the gunfire and extends her arms and legs to take as many bullets as possible just….it gets me every time. And it comes on the heels of her telling Harrison she doesn’t want the kids to turn out like her? Because she thinks there’s something wrong with her?? And I just?? She was good long before Nate turned turned them into the ‘good guys’.

Imagine the disastrous results if other professional jobs followed Trump’s example and let their unqualified (unelected) child do their job for them. How do you think that would work out? Surgeons? Pilots? Attorneys?

Donald Trump and his entire family of greedy grifters are dangerous national security threats to America. Let’s hurry up with that impeachment.

This vacation double standard, a coded dog whistle for ‘lazy black guy’, is the core of GOP populism.

$40,000,000/month for the four years = $1,920,000,000.

That’s TWO BILLION vs $87 million. The GOP silence is deafening.

Donald and Melania are grifters.

wannabanauthor  asked:

Hi there! I love your blog! I've seen you mention a few TV shows and movies for research, and I was wondering what your opinion is on the show Leverage and it's accuracy for social engineering in potentially violent situations. I remember one character saying that "Thieves look for entrances, but grifters create them." They'll often use approaches like this to avoid violence.

If the question is: can you use social engineering in order to defuse or avoid violent situations? The answer is yes.

Grifters are conmen, and like spies, they don’t want to fight unless it is absolutely necessary. Whether they can fight or know how isn’t really the point: combat makes messes, big messes, and draws the kind of attention they don’t want/can’t afford.

As for the line, “thieves look for entrances, but grifters create them” the point of it is that grifters focus on people as the exploitative aspect to get what they want. After all, it doesn’t matter how good your security system is if your infiltrator is expected to be there. When someone opens the door for them, they didn’t have to break in.

It is worth pointing out though, being able to stop, defuse, avoid, or redirect violence via social engineering (especially when the character is the target) is very difficult and requires someone who excels at rapidly changing their story/manipulating under life or death pressure while also maintaining their consistency/re-establishing their innocence/regaining their target’s trust.

That’s masterclass social engineering. The average person, even the average grifter can’t do it. When we see Nate Ford, Sophie Devereaux, or Michael Westen on Burn Notice socially engineer their way out of potentially explosive and violent scenarios, we’re supposed to understand this level of manipulation is very difficult. You need a solid ability to read people, predict their behavior patterns, understand how to shift your role so you suddenly seem trustworthy, confuse them, and then redirect their anger somewhere away from you.

You can see another variant of this kind of social engineering on display in The Negotiator. Samuel L. Jackson’s character is a hostage negotiator. Deliberately maneuvering a man who’s taken a child captive around his apartment so he can be taken out. You can see him joking with the target, gaining his trust, distracting him, and guiding him off topic until he’s in a position to be neutralized.

The Grifter is not a fighter, they are a talker and their trick is getting people to move however they want. A skilled grifter can slip in, turn the best of friends against each other, and walk away without a care. Grifters don’t punch. They trick other people into doing the punching for them. When sitting down to write a Grifter, remember: their first instinct is getting others to act in their place, to create the openings they need, and be their fall guy.

On the whole, I’ve liked Leverage ever since the episode where Eliot pointed out that guns are ranged weapons, and the most common mistake people make is giving up the distance advantage by getting in too close. However, I’ve only watched the first season. I liked what I saw, it’s an enjoyable caper show in a similar vein to The Equalizer, Person of Interest, or Ocean’s Eleven. Not quite in there with the original Law & Order when it comes to accuracy (in this case for cops) but certainly better than White Collar, which uses similar techniques (though never, ever pay attention to White Collar’s usage of the FBI… ever). The X-Files, meanwhile, fudges a bit but it’s pretty good when you’re wanting to get a grasp of the FBI’s culture and what happens to someone who doesn’t come from a military/law enforcement background.

Of course, the patient zero for these types of shows is the original Mission: Impossible. The television show, not the Tom Cruise movies. Mission: Impossible is all about flipping people and manipulating them into positions to do what you want. The A-Team is its slightly more pulpy counterpart, but its a similar (though far less subtle) deal.

On the whole, Leverage tends to explain itself better, which is helpful when you’re trying to learn or take techniques from a television show rather than just absorb.

The reason why I often suggest Burn Notice and Spy Game is not necessarily just because they’re good, but also because they teach. The narrator on Burn Notice, especially in the first season will offer up a lot of helpful/beginner tradecraft for a variety of situations. This, ultimately, will help you more for taking pieces and creating your own characters than a show that’s trying for smoke and mirrors like White Collar. The same situation is there with Spy Game, where Robert Redford’s character is teaching Brad Pitt’s on how to be a spy. Ultimately, more helpful in the long run than just watching The Recruit. The Michael Mann films like Heat and Collateral are exceptionally good for learning tradecraft, but you have to know that’s what you’re watching/looking for. You’ll learn more by watching them together, rather than separately. The Borne Identity novels are also very good at showing the tradecraft, while the Le Carre ones tend to be a little more hit and miss.

When you’re new, you want sources that are free with their information. Who are good at getting you to think, to take what you’re seeing and apply it to new settings. You may not ever figure out how to build a car bomb, but learning about how the thought process of a spy, criminal, or conman works will serve you better for your writing than a hundred other movies that only show.

After you’ve drawn back the curtain then you can turn to those other shows, novels, and narratives with new eyes. Once you see what they’re doing, how they’re doing it, and why when they don’t explain you’ll get more out of those other sources than you did before.

When you’re watching a well put together show like Leverage, start questioning character motivations. Not just whether the social engineering there works, but why the characters are choosing to go that route or which routes they prefer. Leverage gives you five characters with different specialties, four thieves and the guy who made a career catching them. They all think in different ways and have different approaches when it comes to problem solving. Leverage offers up a heist per episode, so you have lots of opportunities to see the characters in action. Evaluate their problem solving methods and you’ll come away with more than just questioning whether or not it works.

How and Why.

Then, go find a good video on YouTube where a professional magician explains pickpocketing. It’s the art of misdirection.

Once you understand basic theoretical underpinnings (whether or not you could ever actually pull the real thing off) then you can apply it to many different situations in a fictional context.

When it comes back to applying this to the combat arts, learning to see the big picture is the first major difference between trained and untrained. The untrained only copy surface level, singular techniques, while trained delves deeper to understand how these techniques work together.

My advice for when you’re wanting to pick and choose television shows for accuracy is to check who their consultants are/were, and what experts in the show’s chosen field say about it. That doesn’t always guarantee accuracy, but it will help you flip through the rave reviews.

If you want to watch more fun shows with Timothy Hutton or just like detective shows, I recommend Nero Wolfe.

-Michi

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron. Every contribution helps keep us online, and writing. If you already are a Patron, thank you.

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

This blog is supported through Patreon. If you enjoy our content, please consider becoming a Patron. Every contribution helps keep us online, and writing. If you already are a Patron, thank you.

I’m laughing so hard at this cover, look at Grifter’s tiny arm, look at his weird blank guns, looks at his awful Liefeld feet, look at his collection of the worlds smallest bullets, look at his sword with a giant hilt but a blade that ends mid back, look at the zero continuation of implied motion, look at his tiny half pouch that intersects his belt buckle because Rob obviously drew the pouches first with out any plans for spaceing or consistant sizing, Rob Liefeld has been drawing comics for almost 30 years and all of his art still looks like something you’d send to someone you hate but who’s language you don’t speak to let them know how much you hate them

YOI Fan Rec Friday

I’m FINALLY back! Thank you to those who rec’d so many fics while I was away! If you don’t see your rec here, don’t worry! I send it in again for next week :) I randomly choose 30 fics for each week!

Rec’d by @bookwormpanda :
with these things i’ll never say by missmichellebelle, Gen, 1.8k
Yuuri has been Victor’s PA for well over a year now, but no matter how many times Victor has told him otherwise, he still leaves actual handwritten notes for Victor to find.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
I’ve Wanted This Before by undermyumbreon, Explicit, 3.3k
Yuuri is finding that it is becoming easier for him to be open about his desires with Victor. When he reveals that there’s a part of himself that he wants to explore, Victor offers a solution.

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Rec’d by @themosthappyambivalent :
Never Look Away by gabapple, mamodewberry, Mature, 152k (WIP)
Everything Viktor knows and loves is tangled up in the world of competitive skating- a world that, for him, is quickly coming to an end. Standing at the precipice of the inevitable, he must decide how his tale unfolds: should he retire into quiet obscurity? Allow himself to be eaten alive by the younger, more vicious competition? …Or risk it all on a struggling, but passionate, skater halfway across the world, who may prove to be the inspiration, life, and love that Viktor’s been missing all this time?

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Rec’d by anonymous:
against the dying of the light by the__magpie, Teen, 2.4k (WIP)
The facts were these: Yuuri Katsuki - twenty-four years, seventeen days, twenty-one hours, and three minutes old; pie maker by day and dead-waking private investigator also by day - has just brought Victor Nikiforov - Grand Prix Final winner; childhood best friend; first kiss - back to life, mostly on accident. Though they can never touch, or Victor will go back to being dead, they can team up to solve the mystery of Victor’s murder and, along the way, learn how to make this unexpected relationship work.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
Inosculation by lazrbrain, Teen, 11k (WIP)
Viktor is motionless, life consisting of his shop and his dog. Yuuri is running, trapped by mistakes he cannot change. Both of them are desperate for more. They find it in each other.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
To the Moon by JMonCheri, Teen, 17k ***Major Character Death
Viktor Nikiforov’s last, literal dying wish is to get a gold medal. Yuri and Otabek figured it would be an easy goal to accomplish, until they figure out that Nikiforov was an Olympic figure skating champion with already a truck ton of other golden medals.

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Rec’d by anonymous, anonymous, and anonymous:
Pigeon Alley by DiAnna44, Teen, 31k
What’s meant to be will always find a way. Victor and Yuuri? They’re meant to be.

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Rec’d by anonymous and anonymous:
Tangle and Wind and Beguile by Mythmaker, Mature, 5.6k (WIP)
Lesson of the day: don’t let strange samovars into your apartment or doe-eyed Japanese boys might pop out and grant you wishes. …No wait.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
yuuri!!! on fire (the superhero au) by hinatella, Teen, 42k (WIP)
A detailed exposé of what working with an ex-villain is like, as told by a very distraught Yuuri Katsuki. (P.S.: it isn’t the fact that he’s an ex-villain that Yuuri is close to losing his mind.)

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Rec’d by @phoenixwaller :
Broken Vases by Aliferous_Sin, Explicit, 22k
Devastated after a performance, Viktor Nikiforov seeks isolation in a darkened closet to bear his loss alone again but discovers that something more than mops are witness to his pain. Will truth find victory in the dark or is pure honesty too much weight for love to thrive under?

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Rec’d by @faithsoprano :
Never Too Late by Soprano, Gen, 15k (WIP)
Victor Nikiforov was not allowed to pursue skating as a child. In the end he still became a star, even if not quite the kind he had wanted to be. His dream, however, never truly died, and going into his 30s, he decided to enter the world of adult figure skating, with the help of his new coach, Katsuki Yuuri.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
That’s What They Say (When We’re Together) by Lightningcatters (Phoeliac), Teen, 2.7k (WIP)
In the wake of her divorce from Yakov, Lilia ran off to Japan and became Yuuri’s coach alongside Minako. She returns to Russia with a challenge for Yakov, who’s become increasingly concerned about Victor’s lack of motivation.Victor and Yuuri ruin everybody’s plans by falling in love instead of becoming rivals.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
Where the Cliff Greets the Sea by RobotSquid, Mature, 27k (WIP)
For years, Victor and his crew of pirates have been the bane of the coast, unmatched and elusive. With little left to satisfy him, he visits the small seaside town of Hasetsu, drawn by its simple charms. Yuuri lives a quiet life sewing and tailoring dresses with the unattainable dream of designing gowns of his own. Victor sees him working through the window of the dress shop, and decides to stay.

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Rec’d by @trenazlore :
Namaste by Katri Jardine (heyanapau), Teen, 10k
Phichit drags Yuuri to a yoga class, but when the instructor walks in Yuuri can’t imagine himself anywhere else.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
stalemate by silencedmockingjay, Teen, 3.4k (WIP)
When Viktor, famous Youtuber and gaming prodigy, gets beaten in a simple straightforward game of chess by someone who calls himself “Eros”, Viktor decides to find him to prove he’s better - and hopefully meet up with him in real life, because hey. Someone who can beat the person with the highest IQ in the world - so far - has to be hot, right?

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Rec’d by anonymous:
A Change of Paths by RoseusJaeger, Teen, 7.9k (WIP)
After losing in the first round of the Pokemon League and finding out his first pokemon from his childhood has died, Katsuki Yuuri announces his retirement from professional battling and retires to his family onsen/pokemon day care. What he doesn’t expect is for five-time Pokemon Contest ribbon winner, Victor Nikiforov, to show up and insist on becoming his coach in the world of contests in exchange for learning how to battle.

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Rec’d @slash-bae
I Need A Hero by malchikelf, MrMich, Teen, 17k
When Yuuri was a kid, all he ever wanted was to be a hero; but his Quirk wasn’t good enough for hero work, and even though he had friends and family encouraging him, he still gave up on his dream. Until one day, when the Iron Prince, the world’s number one pro hero, sees Yuuri save someone’s life and immediately drags him into the world of heroes - and unfortunately for Yuuri, Victor doesn’t take ‘no’ for an answer.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
Savior of the Night by Captain_Winter, Teen, 22k (WIP)
A single Yuuri Katsuki gets an invitation to a childhood friend’s wedding. After pressure from his family to find someone, he may have accidentally told them that he has a long-term boyfriend that he’s going to bring to the wedding. Oops. Yuuri’s forced to do what he never thought he would do… hire someone from an escort service and hope for the best. Enter the most beautiful, suave person in the world, who Yuuri hires to pose as his boyfriend for the wedding. Desperate times call for desperate measures, but who would have thought that desperate measures would have brought him a savior?

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Rec’d by @nekoclair :
Open wounds, closed heart by nekoclair, Teen, 5.8k (WIP)
Sometimes it hurts. It’s not a physical pain, but the marks that they leave are real, too real, and it express itself in the most diverse forms. The heavy breathing, the sleepless nights, the bad habit of thinking too much about matters that should be trivial, and so many other symptoms chase after the young writer who, no longer enduring his own routine, decides to accept any help. Yuri Katsuki opens his arms and welcomes the opportunity to change, and to learn how to live with his worst and most insistent companion: his anxiety.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
Love In Times Of War And Peace by thegrimshapeofyoursmile, Teen, 5.7k (WIP)
It is the year 1904. In an attempt of de-escalating matters with Imperial Russia, translator Yuuri Katsuki accompanies his father to St. Petersburg in a diplomatic mission. However, he certainly did not expect to meet a man as stunning and peculiar as tsarevich Yuri Georgieviech’s bodyguard, Polkovnik Viktor Ivanovich Nikiforov - and even less he expected to fall in love when war is threatening the country.

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Rec’d by @nathanchcn :
Viktor Nikiforov Does NOT Have a Smurf Kink by FigureSgayts, Teen, 2.3k
Viktor loses a bet to Yuuri, leaving him at the mercy of his fiancé in a bathroom with hair dye.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
The Unknown Unknown by opalish, Teen, 7.4k
Yuuri never meant to become a supervillain. These things just happen to him.

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Rec’d by anonymous and anonymous:
let’s go steal an ice rink by FullmetalChords, Mature, 35k (WIP)
Insurance investigator Victor Nikiforov has spent the last decade of his life working for ISU, a corporation that caters to the 1%. His work brings him into contact with several of the world’s most notorious thieves: hacker Phichit Chulanont, infiltration specialist Yuri Plisetsky, retrieval specialist Otabek Altin, and a master grifter and con man known as Katsuki Yuuri. Yuuri in particular catches his eye at a banquet in Geneva, kicking off a whirlwind romance between thief and investigator.

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Rec’d by anonymous:
cancel your reservations by renaissance, renaissance_moving, Teen, 5.4k
Yuuri is a college student conducting private fencing lessons for a handsome, rich, and mysterious student. Viktor is not learning to fence because he does medieval reenactments.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Your eyes could drown a city by Proserpineceres, Gen, 4.2k
“Ocean, beautiful, selfish Ocean, wrap me up in foam, I am your betrothed. You who returns to the earth only the boats and the men you want to give back, give me the gold of the sumptuous sinking vessels, give me their treasures, bring in my town handsome sailors that I shall gaze upon. But, oh, don’t be jealous, I’ll give them back to you, one after the other.”

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
With All My Heart by Hevheia, Explicit, 40k (WIP)
Once upon a time there was a prince and if you stole his heart, you would live forever. But the prince would only have three days left.

✧·゚: *✧·゚:*    *:·゚✧*:·゚✧

Rec’d by anonymous:
Into the Deep by Ars_Matron, Mature, 74k (WIP)
For five years the mysterious pirate ship, the Eros, has tormented the eastern seas. The most heinous of their crimes, the abduction of omegas from their very homes. Some merely children.Viktor Nikiforov, captain of the Russian military’s fastest ship the Agape, has dedicated his life to finding the infamous pirate pack. Rescuing the omegas that he can, and avenging those beyond his reach.


Thank you for all your recs! ₍₍ (̨̡ ‾᷄♡‾᷅ )̧̢ ₎₎

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“What is it about Annette Bening’s singular screen persona that has drawn her to characters of a certain severity? One of the most discerning and revered actors in Hollywood, her public persona radiates with soft-spoken, good-humoured charm – and yet what stands out most prominently from her eclectic film career is the robust gallery of visceral, vinegary and headstrong characters who are unendingly encouraged to change their ways by those behind and in front of the camera.” — Matthew Eng

Read: In praise of Annette Bening’s difficult women