the-city-of-ember

I’ve seen this debate on my dash a few times....

Okay, so I’m going to try and word this as best as I can, with the help of some photos. This is probably going to be quite long, sorry. So there has been a debate on whether Comic Books and Graphic Novels are classed as actual books and if you can include them in reading challenges and photo challenges.

So, graphic novels and comics like these…. Personally, I think they are the same as books and you can include them in reading challenges. So I’m going to explain why I think that. Let’s compare shall we, lets get a book and a comic….

Hmmmm, maybe comparing Batman to a completely different story isn’t going to work….

That’s better. EXACTLY THE SAME STORY!! One’s just told through pictures and words instead of just words.

So this is exactly the same part in both books. But one needs a lot less words because you don’t have to explain the setting, environment, timing or emotions. All of that is shown through the pictures, which just leaves the basic dialogue. You still have to read, pay attention and think. It tells the same story and has exactly the same effect, the only difference is the fact you don’t need all of the description. Okay, so let’s compare two other completely different books….

….like these. The top one is a book and there is no debate on that at all. The second, is a comic/graphic novel and there is a debate on whether you can class that as a proper book…. lets have a closer look….

Okay, so the book has 80 pages that are all like this…. the comic is a lot thicker and…. wow…. that’s a lot of text. That is quite small. Surely, they can’t all be similar….

(Yes, these are all from the same comic. It includes old and newer comics that include The Riddler.) Oh wait, so that is still a lot of text. Actually, I think that is more than the actual books…. There is a lot to read and to take in. Yet, people still debate whether it is a book that you can include in a reading challenge….

Okay, let’s have a look at 2 other comics shall we….

Like these…. first up….

….The Killing Joke. Oh look, an introduction…. lots of words. Okay, so I admit, there isn’t as much reading as the previous comic. But, there is still quite a bit. But like I said, in comics there is no need to describe the settings etc…. I don’t really need to explain much more here. Just like in comics, the pictures speak for themselves.

Finally, Arkham Unhinged. This is actually the second one in a series of 4 (so far). Again, even less writing. But it is split into more comics after this. But, there is still a fair amount. I can’t show every page obviously, but there is probably the same amount as a short story. 

Okay, so that may not have been 100% clear as I’m not too good with wording things…. So let me try to sum up here….

1. Some comic/graphic novels actually have more words than some books.
2. A graphic novel don’t need to describe settings, the environment, weather, emotions, how characters look etc because the pictures do all of that. Leaving only the basic dialogue.
3. You still have to read them, understand them, pay attention, think, and the story is still told whether through pictures or words.
4. Picture books are classed as books and some people include them in reading challenges…. Picture books, with no word. But people still debate over comics….. that contain words.
5. IT STILL TELLS THE STORY!!

Comics are great for getting you out of reading slumps because they a quick to read and exciting. They are brilliant for just before bed, on the bus, in the car etc. Exactly the same as books. They help to get kids into reading. But saying that, they are brilliant for anyone, no matter age or gender. If you want to read comics, do it. Include them in reading challenges, include them in book photos. Read them, enjoy them, love them. 

DON’T LET ANYONE TELL YOU THAT JUST BECAUSE YOU READ COMICS, THAT YOU DON’T READ BOOKS. THEY STILL TELL A STORY.

Read what you want to :) Happy Reading!!

There is no pretending, I love you Clary, and I’ll love you until I die, and if there’s a life after that, I’ll love you then.
—  Jace Herondale

anonymous asked:

do you have any book recs?

anon bby i always have book recs  ôヮô and here is an extensive list (just for you :D haha) sorted out by genre. i’ve bolded some of my personal favourites, too.


BOOK RECS

descriptive dystopia

  • The 5th Wave by Rick Yancy
  • Across the Universe by Beth Revis
  • The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary E. Pearson
  • Birthmarked by Caragh M. O’Brien
  • Blood Red Road by Moira Young
  • Chaos Walking trilogy by Patrick Ness
  • The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau
  • Delirium by Lauren Oliver
  • Divergent by Veronica Roth
  • The Giver by Lois Lowry
  • The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
  • The Long Walk by Stephen King
  • Matched by Ally Condie
  • The Maze Runner by James Dashner
  • The Memory Palace by Hari Kunzru
  • Partials by Dan Wells
  • Uglies by Scott Westerfeld
  • Unwind by Neal Shusterman

you mustn’t forget YA fiction

  • 13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher
  • Amelia Anne is Dead and Gone by Kat Rosenfield
  • Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins
  • Any Way the Wind Blows by Carlin Grant
  • Artemis Fowl by Erin Colfer
  • Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz
  • The Art of Being Normal by Lisa Williamson
  • Ask the Passengers by A.S. King
  • Before I Fall by Lauren Oliver
  • The Bermudez Triangle by Maureen Johnson
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in The Night-Time by Mark Maddon
  • Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour
  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  • Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell
  • Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  • Honey Girl by Lisa Freeman
  • I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak
  • If I Stay by Gayle Forman
  • It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini
  • Jerkbait by Mia Siegert
  • Just One Day by Gayle Forman
  • Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
  • Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer
  • A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • Looking for Alaska by John Green
  • The Lost Prince by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews
  • My Sister’s Keeper by Jodi Picoult
  • The Miseducation of Cameron Post by emily m. danforth
  • The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart
  • None of the Above by I.W. Gregorio
  • On the Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta
  • The Only Alien on the Planet by Kristen D. Randle
  • Peak by Roland Smith
  • Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
  • Pictures of Hollis Woods by Patricia Reilly Giff
  • The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • So B. It by Sarah Weeks
  • South of Sunshine by Dana Elmendorf
  • Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
  • Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli
  • Thirteen Little Blue Envelopes by Maureen Johnson
  • This One Summer by Jillian Tamaki & Mariko Tamaki
  • Two Boys Kissing by David Levithan
  • A Tyranny of Petticoats edited by Jessica Spotswood
  • Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green & David Levithan

facinating fantasy

  • The 13th Reality: The Journal of Curious Letters by James Dashner
  • A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
  • The Akhenaten Adventure (Children of the Lamp) by P.B. Kerr
  • Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
  • Black: The Birth of Evil (The Circle series) by Ted Dekker
  • Cinder by Marissa Meyer
  • Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor
  • Drift by Sharon Carter Rogers
  • Everlost by Neal Shusterman
  • Every Day by David Levithan
  • Fablehaven by Brandon Mull
  • The Green Mile by Stephen King
  • Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling
  • The Hourglass Door by Lisa Mangum
  • Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
  • Leven Thumps by Obert Skye
  • The Looking Glass Wars by Frank Beddor
  • The Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare
  • The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
  • Percy Jackson by Rick Riordan
  • Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson
  • The Prestige by Christopher Priest
  • The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater
  • Reckless by Cornelia Funke
  • The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness
  • The Rook by Daniel O’Malley
  • The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke
  • Vicious by V.E. Schwab
  • Zeroes by Scott Westerfeld, Margo Lanagan, & Deborah Biancotti

high/epic fantasy

  • The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  • A Darkher Shade of Magic by V.E. Schwab 
  • Dragon Rider by Cornelia Funke
  • Dragon Slippers by Jessica Day George
  • The Dragon’s Blade: The Reborn King by Michael R. Miller
  • Eragon by Christopher Paolini
  • Graceling by Kristin Cashore
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Nimona by Noelle Stevenson
  • Of Fire and Stars by Audrey Coulthurst
  • Princess Academy by Shannon Hale
  • Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen
  • Saga by Bryan K. Vaughan & Fiona Staples
  • The Sea of Trolls by Nancy Farmer
  • Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo
  • Storm Glass by Maria V. Snyder
  • Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

fantastic fairytales

  • Beastly by Alex Flinn
  • Bewitching by Alex Flinn
  • Book of a Thousand Days by Shannon Hale
  • Cinder by Marissa Meyer
  • Cloaked by Alex Flinn
  • East by Edith Pattou
  • Ever by Gail Carson Levine
  • Fairest by Gail Carson Levine
  • The Goose Girl by Shannon Hale
  • Just Ella by Margaret Peterson Haddix
  • A Kiss in Time by Alex Flinn
  • Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson
  • Reckless by Cornelia Funke
  • The Storyteller’s Daughter by Cameron Dokey
  • Wild Orchid by Cameron Dokey

serious(ly good) sci-fi (not dystopian)

  • Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick
  • Bruiser by Neal Shusterman
  • The Dark Side of Nowhere by Neal Shusterman
  • Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
  • The Host by Stephanie Meyer
  • The Hollow City by Dan Wells
  • The House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer
  • The Martian by Andy Weir
  • Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
  • Virals by Kathy Reichs

terrific thrillers/fast-paced reads

  • Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick
  • Burn by Ted Dekker
  • Dark Places by Gillian Flynn
  • GONE by Michael Grant
  • Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  • The Hollow City by Dan Wells
  • Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer
  • The Martian by Andy Weir
  • The Merciless by Danielle Vega
  • The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death by Charlie Huston
  • Phantoms by Dean Koontz
  • Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier 
  • Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn
  • The Shining by Stephen King
  • Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane
  • Thr3e by Ted Dekker
  • Watchers by Dean Koontz
  • The Wheelman by Duane Swierczynski

ready to read romance

  • Almost Like Being in Love by Steve Kluger
  • Austenland by Shannon Hale
  • Every Day by David Levithan
  • Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour
  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  • On The Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta 
  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • Since You’ve Been Gone by Morgan Matson
  • South of Sunshine by Dana Elmendorf
  • Thirteen Little Blue Envelopes by Maureen Johnson

promising paranormal romance

  • Beautiful Creatures by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl
  • Bruiser by Neal Shusterman
  • Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor
  • A Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray
  • The Host by Stephanie Meyer
  • The Infernal Devices by Cassandra Clare
  • The Mortal Instruments by Cassandra Clare
  • Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater
  • Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead

absolutely astounding adult fiction

  • Can’t Wait to Get to Heaven by Fannie Flagg
  • City of the Mind by Penelope Lively
  • The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  • Dark Places by Gillian Flynn
  • Fried Green Tomatoes At the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg
  • Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett
  • Keep Me Posted by Lisa Beazley
  • Illusions: Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah by Richard Bach
  • Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
  • Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan
  • The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death by Charlie Huston
  • Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
  • Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston
  • The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
  • The Wheelman by Duane Swierczinski

mighty mystery

  • Amelia Anne is Dead and Gone by Kat Rosenfield
  • The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon
  • The Green Mile by Stephen King
  • I Am the Messenger by Markus Zusak
  • The Lost Prince by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold
  • Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan
  • Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
  • Mystery of the Blue Train by Agatha Christie
  • The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart
  • Nancy Drew (all of them!) by Carolyn Keene
  • On The Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta
  • The Prestige by Christopher Priest
  • The Rook by Daniel O’Malley
  • The Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket
  • Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  • A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield
  • Thr3e by Ted Dekker
  • The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin
  • The Vanishing by Wendy Webb

honestly the best historical fiction

  • All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  • Fried Green Tomatoes At the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg
  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett
  • The King’s Shadow by Elizabeth Alder
  • Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
  • Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
  • The Lost Prince by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
  • Out of the Dust by Karen Hesse
  • Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Patrick Suskind
  • Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  • A Tyranny of Petticoats edited by Jessica Spotswood
  • The Vanishing by Wendy Webb

classy classics

  • Brave, New World by Aldous Huxley
  • The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  • A Day No Pigs Would Die by Robert Newton Peck
  • Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  • A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
  • Mystery of the Blue Train by Agatha Christie
  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  • The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  • Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
  • A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Nurston
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

popular (and not) plays

  • House Arrest by Anna Deavere Smith
  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde
  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare
  • The Mountaintop by Katori Hall
  • Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare 
  • Trifles by Susan Glaspell
  • Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare

notable non-fiction

  • 84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff
  • The Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell
  • Call the Midwife: A True Story of the East End in the 1950s by Jennifer Worth
  • Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America by Erik Larson
  • Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
  • Dude, You’re A Fag by C.J. Pascoe
  • Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel
  • Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies: A Guide to Language for Fun and Spite by June Casagrande
  • Honor Girl by Maggie Thrash
  • My Horizontal Life by Chelsea Handler
  • My Thirteenth Winter: A Memoir by Samantha Abeel
  • Naked Statistics: Stripping the Dread from the Data by Charles Wheelan 
  • Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers by Lillian Faderman
  • Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
  • The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester 
  • Reading Stephen King: Issues of Censorship, Student Choice, and Popular Literature by Brenda Miller Power
  • The Story of Jane: The Legendary Underground Abortion Service by Laura Kaplan
  • The Profession of Violence by John Pearson
  • The Vanishing Hitchhiker: American Urban Legends and Their Meanings by Jan Harold Brunvand
  • You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) by Felicia Day

brilliant books about books 

  • The Girl Who Was on Fire: Your Favorite Authors on Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games Trilogy by Wilson Leah
  • Harry, a History: The True Story of a Boy Wizard, His Fans, and Life Inside the Harry Potter Phenomenon by Melissa Anelli
  • Repotting Harry Potter: A Professor’s Book-By-Book Guide for the Serious Re-Reader by James W. Thomas
  • The Wand in the World: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy by Leonard S. Marcus

poignant poetry

  • Out Of The Dust by Karen Hesse
  • Poems from Homeroom: A Writer’s Place to Start by Kathi Appelt
  • Split Image by Mel Glenn
  • Stop Pretending: What Happened When My Sister Went Crazy by Sonya Sones
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

breathtaking 
books for book-lovers

  • 84 Charing Cross Road by Helene Hanff
  • The Anybodies by N.E. Bode
  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
  • Matilda by Roald Dahl
  • Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan
  • The Professor and The Madman by Simon Winchester
  • Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon
  • The Thirteenth Tale by Diane Setterfield

Circumstance (Part 2)

Rowaelin daughter x Feysand son 

Here’s Part 2! Thank you all so much for the positive feedback already. Keep it coming!

Tagging a few people who have been helping me: @readinggiraffe @rhysand-and-rowan @autumn03 @destiny14444 (If you want to be tagged in future parts, let me know!)

Fic Masterlist


Cadewyn is amazed by the beauty of Terrasen. The towering mountains, crystal clear lakes, and enormous, flourishing pine trees that surround the capital city of Orynth is completely breathtaking. As he follows the Captain of the Guard, Aedion, around the palace grounds, he is struck by how different it is from the Night Court.

In Velaris, his parents do not own a large castle, or a huge plot of land. There is Aunt Elain’s garden, but Cade is sure she would love to see the one in Terrasen thrice the size of her own. Only in the last few years has Cade been able to venture down to the Court of Nightmares, and the difference between the two capitals is practically palpable.

Terrasen is fresh, new, and clean, with smiles passed between everyone and a calm atmosphere. The palace, which Cade has learned was built only in the last couple decades, is pristine, though old fashioned, and though it is enormous, has an incredibly homey feel to it. Hewn City is dark, extravagant, and the tension that is constantly floating in the air gives him a headache whenever he visits. The architecture is old and, though it is kept very clean, feels dirty.  

Quickly, and without much effort, Cade finds himself at ease in the company of the captain as they stroll along the edge of the forest and make polite conversation. Aedion only looks a few years older than Cade, but the boy knows better. The captain may not have pointed ears or elongated teeth, but Cade can recognize the smell of fae blood in him.

They have been walking a few minutes in silence, just admiring their surroundings, when Cade finally works up the courage to ask. “So, how old are you?” He wonders, trying to be nonchalant about it so as not to seem rude.

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