the-ancient-near-east

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The Epic Of Gilgamesh In Sumerian

The EPIC OF GILGAMESH is the earliest great work of literature that we know of, and was first written down by the Sumerians around 2100 B.C.

Ancient Sumer was the land that lay between the two rivers, the Tigris and Euphrates, in Mesopotamia. The language that the Sumerians spoke was unrelated to the Semitic languages of their neighbors the Akkadians and Babylonians, and it was written in a syllabary (a kind of alphabet) called “cuneiform”. By 2000 B.C., the language of Sumer had almost completely died out and was used only by scholars (like Latin is today). No one knows how it was pronounced because it has not been heard in 4000 years.

What you hear in this video are a few of the opening lines of part of the epic poem, accompanied only by a long-neck, three-string, Sumerian lute known as a “ngish-gu-di”. The instrument is tuned to G - G - D, and although it is similar to other long neck lutes still in use today (the tar, the setar, the saz, etc.) the modern instruments are low tension and strung with fine steel wire. The ancient long neck lutes (such as the Egyptian “nefer”) were strung with gut and behaved slightly differently. The short-neck lute known as the “oud” is strung with gut/nylon, and its sound has much in common with the ancient long-neck lute although the oud is not a fretted instrument and its strings are much shorter (about 25 inches or 63 cm) as compared to 32 inches (82 cm) on a long-neck instrument.

For anyone interested in these lutes, I highly recommend THE ARCHAEOMUSICOLOGY OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST by Professor Richard Dumbrill.

The location for this performance is the courtyard of Nebuchadnezzar’s palace in Babylon. The piece is four minutes long and is intended only as a taste of what the music of ancient Sumer might have sounded like.

“The Sumerians” by Grendel Dark

Vessel in the form of a zebu

This fired clay vessel in the form of a hump-backed bull (a zebu) was made around 3,000 years ago. Quite large (39cm long) it belongs to a ceramic tradition of north-western Iran known as the Amlash culture.

Similar vessels have been excavated from intact tombs in Iran in the shape of stags, rams and horses. They were clearly intended to be pourers but their exact function remains uncertain, although a ceremonial use is likely. 

You can see this, and others, on display in our Ancient Near East gallery on the ground floor.

Witches in the Ancient World

Witches were not revered, loved, or respected in ‘Pagan Times’. Magic was widely used in the ancient world, and more open for sure, but that didn’t change much when Christianity came around. Magic was still used, but the names were changed. Witches, however, were always detested.

I’ve noticed people trying to pin in back to Rome when it converted to Christianity, so let’s start there.

When Rome was still ruled by pagans, witchcraft was outlawed. The use of it was severely censured and could result in death. Practices like necromancy, maleficium, and the like were not accepted or tolerated. When it converted to Christianity, the law stayed the same. As they colonized, they brought it with them. But the fear of witches did not begin with the Romans.
The fear and detesting of witches was widespread in the ancient world.
Close by, pagan Greece had sects of witches who were feared by the locals. Their mysterious rituals involving mandrakes, crossroads, and ghosts caused a fair amount of alarm.
In the Ancient Near East, high magic flourished. Magic involving the stars, spirits, deities, and the like was popular. However, sorcerers and witches were not welcome. Charms and spells against witches were made out of clay, written on, and buried.
In the Americas (pre-colonization), witches were feared and hated. Still within indigenous communities, witches hold a bad reputation. To insinuate that someone is a witch is to make a very big accusation. 
In the British Isles, you’ll hear lovely tales and myths of wizards, but witches are always given a tone of darkness. Wizards helped kings, aided in battles, found missing object, etc. Witches cursed heroes, stalled them, gave them obstacles, etc. 
There is, of course, the argument of cunning folk, now called ‘white witches’. However, there was almost always a distinction made between cunning folk and witches. The people who called them witches were few and far between (and most likely disagreed with the cunning person’s use of magic). Cunning folk were the enemy of witches. They used spell and charm to attack and derail witch attacks. The Benandanti of Italy are a good example of this. Though they rode through the air on stalks of Fennel, cast spells, and attended secret meetings in spirit, they are not called witches.

This is what I referred to before when I said there was a difference between magic and witchcraft. A rectangle is a square, but a square isn’t a rectangle. Similarly, witchcraft is magic, but not all magic is witchcraft.
Historically, witchcraft has always been a shadowy thing. It’s dark, secretive, dangerous, etc. It’s practiced on the edge of society. Magic is found all over in the ancient world, not just on the fringe. However, if you called a magician a witch, you would’ve either made them laugh or spit.

The word was ‘reclaimed’ relatively recently. Its meaning changed. It was taken from its darker background. Instead, it became associated with pagan elements, some ceremonial practices, and other forms of magic. 

That isn’t to say that the modern definition is a false one. Simply put, it means that it’s modern. It did not mean the same thing thousands of years ago, and for certain circles, it doesn’t mean the same thing now.

Witches have always been feared, according to the history and folklore left behind for us to see. Magic over time was called evil by many different faiths, despite the fact that it flourished in the very walls of the churches and temples they were taught in. It lived on in different names. Witches, for the most part, did not change their name. Many things were relabeled as witchcraft. 

As far as history goes, try not to get it from witchcraft books. Read anthropological essays and journals. Read books written by historians who are passionate about the subject. Always double check facts. Put them to the test.

Ideas I just had: A retelling of Avatar: The Last Airbender, but set in the ancient near east with the kingdoms replaced with thematically similar cultures of the second and third millennium BC. Ancient Iran is the Fire Nation due to the earlier precursors of Zoroastrianism that worshipped fire and based their religion and court rituals around it. The water tribe is Ancient Egypt- not sure how that works with the oppression angle, but they are the “hydraulic civilisation” after all and based their cosmos on water. Southern Mesopotamia (Sumerian city-states or Akkad or Babylonian dominion depending on the timepoint) is obviously the earth kingdom because their entire civilisation and conception of existence was based around clay. The Air Nation is the Hittites because of the storm worship/ thunder god angle which is WEIRD because the Hittites definitely weren’t pacifists, but oh well.

Artists hit me up if you want to collab on this, I’m serious.

anonymous asked:

Hello. I am more of a student of High Magic, but I do have a significant knowledge of witchcraft mostly for green/healing purposes. I often find witches that "borrow" serious aspects of more "serious" paths, from Thelema to the Kabbalah and such, and they are extremely defensive when I try to point out the personal danger of misunderstanding knowledge as well as the disrespect for some of those traditions. Can you discuss that a bit more? Some witches just think their craft is the only right! S2

Forewarning, this is going to be a very long post. 

Many witches aren’t aware of the origins of their own craft. Unfortunately, trying to talk to them about it can make them defensive, as their teachers or sources might have once told them otherwise. 
A lot of the witchcraft that floats around today draws its lineage back to Wicca. The style of magic that they practice, often more ritualized than they know, does not consist merely of witchcraft. This is where people get defensive. 
Witchcraft, as it is known in folklore and history, is a kind of folk magic that often involves malefic intent. Even if one removes malefic intent from this, it is still majorly based in folk magic. 
When Wicca was created, Gardner (with a ton of help from Doreen Valiente) mixed folk magic with high magic. The major source that his high magic comes from is Solomonic in nature. His ritual tools, now known as the tools of Wicca, are interpretations of tools described in the Key of Solomon. A black handled knife, tempered with the blood of a black cat, would be used to draw circles and command spirits. This would change (and become much less macabre) in Wicca in becoming a general knife for magic and non-physical cutting. Though in Wicca, the white handled knife is for cutting, the Solomonic traditions hold it to be the knife to use in all other acts of magic, besides drawing a circle. Wands, swords, cups, and metal symbols are all commonly found in high magical traditions. But Gardner didn’t hide the origins of these things. He openly said that he borrowed from Sorcerers.
Another thing to keep in mind is that Gardner was, as many other high magicians at the time, a Freemason. Though Freemasonry itself has little involvement in magic, the Freemasons themselves often take it upon themselves to study the Geometry of the Universe.  When he left Freemasonry, he took the rituals and symbols with him, and neatly tucked them inside of Wicca. The rituals Gardner described and performed bear an uncanny resemblance to the rituals used by Freemasons. 
These things, over time, were forgotten by many who were drawn into the religion in search of witchcraft. The history behind it was lost, hidden, or forgotten. As time moved on, people left Wicca, but kept the style of magic it taught to them. Eventually, as it grew, more people pulled in more influences that were not originally associated with witches. Eastern spirituality, New Age beliefs, Kabbalistic and Thelemic techniques, etc. Now people are practicing a mixture of magical practices, ranging all from high magic to folk magic, but know it all as witchcraft. This unique combination birthed out of Wicca has come to be labeled Modern Witchcraft. 

As far as traditional witches go, it changes, depending on the tradition or lineage your talking about. Even the kind of ‘traditional’ matters. 
You have all the followers of the Cultus Sabbati, the most popular of traditional witchcrafts, who are essentially witches working high magic (often going by the term ‘sorcerer’). Their witch imagery comes from the same place that all traditional witches pull from, but their ecstatic techniques are often quite their own. What isn’t their own was pulled from old grimoires. 
Generally speaking, most traditional witches interested in working high magic will pull their knowledge from classic grimoires. Agrippa, Goetia, The Key of Solomon, The Grimoirium Verum, The Red Dragon, The Black Pullet, etc. 
Then you’ve got the other half of traditional witches. Their practices are mostly based in folk magic and the witch lore found in the Early Modern Period (mainly from Europe and America). High magic is sometimes included, but the majority of their practices are spells and charms, rather than complex rituals and long evocations. That isn’t to say that they may not dip into ceremonial magic from time to time. Nor does it exclude spirit work. Folk magic still offers a plethora of ways to do spirit work without dipping into high magic. 

Why is there such a sharp division between high magic and folk magic? It’s mainly due to the practitioners of both in the past and their relationship to wealth. High Magicians were the ones employed in the courts of kings, queens, and temples. They worked rituals with gods and spirits and stars to find prophecies, ensure a happy afterlife, appease forces, and generally work in the Universe in favor of the king or queen. Remember John Dee? These high magicians were wealthy, and their art costed a pretty penny. Their grimoires and objects of power were sold at extremely high prices, passed from hand to hand through time. That was though, after they had died. 
Folk magicians worked magic that the everyday person had to worry about. How does one stop and start storms, ensure good health, bring luck, curse enemies, make animals come home, etc? They worked their art to both harm and heal. Charms made of string, glass, bone, wood, parchment, and cloth were used to bring desired effects. Because witches were thought to be of lower wealth, the majority of witch workings described in folklore are of folk magic. Those folk magicians who had access to grimoires (which were very few) sometimes used them in concert with folk magic. 

I noticed your use of the word ‘serious’ when talking about high magic. Be very careful there. It is true that high magic often takes a much more solemn tone, but folk magic is not to be dismissed. The witches in Scotland, described as being able to destroy entire fields of crops with storms, were thought to do so with folk magic. The witches in the Ancient Near East who fed images of their enemies to dogs to do them harm were also practicing folk magic.
“High” and “Low” are not indicators of power. It is the relationship between Heaven and Earth. 

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Massive Luristan Sword with Double Ear Pommel, 10th-9th Century BC

A magnificent, enormous bronze sword of the “double ear” pommel style, made using the lost wax casting technique by highly trained urban artisans for an elite member of a nomadic horse-riding clan. The blade was cast first, and then the handle was cast onto it - scans of similar swords have revealed tangs inside the handles. 4.75" W x 35.25" H (12.1 cm x 89.5 cm)

Keep reading

Grandfather tells of better days to come
It’s only hope we hold and ends to rope
No one says; my aunts hustle and I bring broth
And my mom bleeds and bleeds

The festival comes, the dancing begins
My mom should play the tambourine
She wears bangles and a sparkling nose ring
She sings prophecy, misted with danced dirt
And the outsiders hunger for her words

For we don’t envy you
We understand
The grandness of life you’ve sacrificed

My mom wants to continue, and her words
Shrivel sweetly like figs; they’re just for me
And I can’t repeat what she said that day

@katrinnac

Greek Bee Fibula, 4th century BC

The bee, found in the artifacts of Ancient Near East and Aegean cultures, was believed to be the sacred insect that bridged the natural world to the underworld.

Potnia, the Minoan-Mycenaean “mistress” goddess,  was referred to as “The Pure Mother Bee”. Her priestesses received the name of “Melissa” (“bee”). It is interesting to note that Mycenaean tholos tombs were shaped like beehives.

In another myth, the Homeric Hymn to Apollo acknowledges that Apollo’s gift of prophecy first came to him from three bee maidens, usually identified with the Thriae. The Thriae was a trinity of pre-Hellenic Aegean bee goddesses.

“Excavation of Persepolis (Iran): Throne Hall, Southern Wall, West Jamb of Western Doorway: View of Uppermost Register Picturing Enthroned King Giving Audience under the Winged Symbol with Partly Encircled Figure of Ahuramazda”

1923-1928

glass negative from the Ernst Herzfeld Papers

Freer and Sackler Archives

Non-Fiction Resources for Chronicles of Darkness by Gameline

June 6th Update: It seems that Tumblr has a limit to how many links you can put in one post. As a result, I’ve moved the resources for Dark Eras, as well as the links organized by topic, to a separate post that you can find at this link. 

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Much like I did for Eberron, I’m putting together some links to non-fiction materials you could use for Chronicles of Darkness. Since CofD is set in a dark mirror of our world, there are a lot of materials that could go in this post, but I will try to be selective. While I am keeping Chronicles in mind while I do this, you could use these links for any other RPG that is set on historical Earth (I’m looking at you, Call of Cthulhu!) Some links may show up more than once if they fit in multiple categories.

This post is very much a work in progress and probably will never be complete because of the broad availability of applicable materials. If you know of a resource that you don’t see on my list, please feel free to reblog/reply/DM me to say what the resource is and why it should be included on the list. I’ll do my best to add it in.

General Websites

  • Crash Course: It’s free, it’s on Youtube, and it’s in a ten-minute episodic format. 
  • Coursera: Coursera is a website where university level classes are available for free. You can also get certifications from Coursera for a fee so you can build your resume while planning your next chronicle. 
  • Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History: Dan loves historical “What if?” moments, and with good reason. If you want to hear the most badass historical stories, examine how drugs, alcohol, and human stupidity impacted history, or get a sense of what it was like to live through the most brutal historical eras, this is the place for you.
  • edX: Another excellent site with free courses that you can upgrade for a certificate. A good place to look for courses in the humanities and religion. 
  • Great Course/Great Courses Plus: GC and GC+ are not free services, but they have such an extraordinarily high production value that you can understand why. History, science, culinary theory, economics, anything you can think of is covered in the Great Courses catalogue. Great Courses Plus is their streaming service, which at $15/month for an annual subscription is a killer deal.
  • Google Books/Google Scholar: My first goto for research of any kind, and the first place I advise my students to begin their research. Seriously, I’ve written papers, then had them published just using these two. Use them. 
  • JSTOR: If you have operated in any kind of academic circle for the last two and a half decades, you know JSTOR. Full access is tough to come by unless you are currently enrolled in a university, but you can still sign up for free to get access to journals on topics you just can’t find anywhere else (like the Mutapa Empire). Sign up with multiple users if you have to. It works. Trust me. 
  • Open Yale Courses: University classes, taped lectures, and course materials, all from one of the best educational institution in the world. Take advantage of them. 
  • The Vault: Declassified FBI documents. A lot more of them involve the paranormal than you may expect. An excellent source of inspiration both for things that actually happened or that people think happened. 
  • Writing with Colour: The best place to go to check yourself for unintentionally problematic depictions of POC in your games. Also a great read if you are looking for details and cultural beats for NPCs you don’t share a background with. They are awesome and you’d be surprised how many chronicle ideas you can get just by binging their archive. 

******************

Mortal Chronicles

  • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
  • History of the United States 2nd Edition
  • Maya to Aztec - Ancient Mesoamerica Revealed: Awesome resource if you are planning to run a Skinchangers game using the Aztec Dark Era. 
  • Medical School for Everyone - Pediatric Grand Rounds: A good place to look for ideas for Innocents 
  • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History

Beast the Primordial

  • General
    • Ancient Marine Reptiles: Yeah, I know, Beast is supposed to be about dragons and monsters, but I guarantee you that plenty of ancient reptiles are also stalking the Primordial Dream. Plus, aquatic reptiles are awesome and don’t get enough face time with the public, so you might want to think about your next Beast being one. 
    • Dino 101: The ultimate course about Dinosaurs. Very beastly. 
    • Early Vertebrate Evolution: What’s so scary about ancient fish, you ask? Only razor jaws and bone for skin. 
    • Secrets to Sleep Science
    • Theropod Dinosaurs and the Origins of Birds: At five lessons long, this course is pretty short, and the content matter is fascinating (says the biology teacher).
  • Dark Eras
    • African-American History: From Emancipation to the Present
    • The Civil War and Reconstruction Eras
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
  • Signature Settings
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Mountains 101: If you are going to visit Kathmanud, you better be thinking about how mountains will impact your Chronicle!
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History

Changeling the Lost

  • General
    • Secrets to Sleep Science
    • Successful Negotiation - Essential Strategies and Skills: A very, very Changeling course. 
  • Dark Eras
    • Atlas Historique de Paris: I can’t read French, but I am assured by people who do that this is an excellent resource. 
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • Underground Atlas of Paris
  • Signature Settings
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History

Demon the Descent 

  • General
    • Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency Technologies
    • Crash Course Computer Science 
    • Crash Course Games
    • Digital Signal Processing
    • Internet History, Technology, and Security
    • Inventions That Changed the World
    • Robotics - Ariel Robotics
    • Successful Negotiation - Essential Strategies and Skills: Also a very, very Demon course. 
  • Dark Eras
    • Living in the French Revolution and the Age of Napoleon
    • Maya to Aztec - Ancient Mesoamerica Revealed
    • Ottoman Empire
  • Signature Settings
    • Cultural Competence - Aboriginal Sydney
    • A History of Hitler’s Empire
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Hollywood: History, Industry, Art
    • Ottoman Empire
    • World War II - A Military and Social History

Deviant the Renegades

  • General
    • Addiction and the Brain
    • The Addictive Brain
    • Drugs and the Brain
    • Frontiers of Biomedical Engineering
  • Dark Eras
  • Signature Settings

Geist the Sin-Eater

  • General
    • Death: Seriously, that’s all the course is called. It’s Yale, its good, the name is just to the point. 
    • Soul Beliefs 1 - Historical Foundations
    • Soul Beliefs 2 - Belief Systems
    • Soul Beliefs 3 - How Does It All End?
  • Dark Eras
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • The Great War
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Indigenous Canada
  • Signature Settings
    • The Early Middle Ages (284-1000)
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • World War II - A Military and Social History

Hunter the Vigil

  • General
    • Introduction to Forensics
  • Aegis Kai Doru
    • Archaeology - An Introduction to the World’s Greatest Sites
    • Introduction to Ancient Greek History
  • Ahl al-Jabal (Source)
    • Ismaili Gnosis: Okay, breaking alphabetical order here, but this one is special. If you have a passing familiarity with Islam, you may have had the initial thought that the write-up of Ahl al-Jabal doesn’t look like anything you’ve seen before. That’s because Ahl al-Jabal are Nizari Ismaili Shiites and trust me when I say it is extremely accurate (minus the vampire hunting). Ismaili Gnosis is an excellent source for current events, history, and particularly metaphysics as it applies to Ismailis. 
    • Assassin Legends: The Assassin State of the Crusades is legendary, but what most people know about them is just that: legend. If you are using the Ahl al-Jabal, either in historical or modern chronicles, let Farhad Daftary bust the myths about the Nizari State for you. This link only gives you a preview on Google Books, so some pages will be missing, but it is still worth a read. 
  • Ama-San (Source) 
    • Oceanography- Exploring Earth’s Final Wilderness
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History 
  • Ascending Ones
    • History of Ancient Egypt
  • Ashwood Abbey
    • Wine Tasting - Sensory Techniques for Wine Analysis: Are you really part of the Abbey if you aren’t a wine connoisseur? 
  • Ave Minerva (Source)
    • The History of Rome Podcast 
  • Azusa Miko (Source)
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History 
  • Barrett Commission (Source)
    • Crash Course US Government & Politics 
  • The Bear Lodge (Source) 
    • Mountains 101
  • Bijin (Source)
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History 
  • The Cainite Heresy (Source)
    • Gnosticism - From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas
    • Lost Christianities 
  • Cheiron Group
    • Critical Business Skills for Success
    • Economic History of the World Since 1400
  • Division Six (Source)
    • Crash Course US Government & Politics: Division Six may not actually be a part of the US Government, but they sure think they are, so understanding how they think they fit in isn’t a bad idea. 
  • The Faithful of Shulpae (Source)
    • The Ancient Near East - History, Society, and Economy
  • Habibti Ma  (Source)
    • The United States and the Middle East - 1914 to 9/11
  • Hototogisu (Source)
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History 
  • The Hunt Club (Source)
    • Forensic History
  • Illuminated Brotherhood (Source)
    • Addiction and the Brain
    • The Addictive Brain
    • Drugs and the Brain
  • Keepers of the Source (Source)
    • Understanding the Mysteries of Human Behaviour
  • Keepers of the Weave (Source)
    • Indigenous Canada 
  • Knights of Saint Adrian (Source)
    • Why Evil Exists
  • Knights of Saint George (Source)
    • The History of Christianity
  • Les Mysteres (Source)
    • Crash Course Mythology 
    • Cultural Literacy for Religion
    • Great Mythologies of the World
  • Les Voyageurs (Source)
    • Indigenous Canada 
  • The Long Night
    • The Apocolypse - Controversies and Meanings in Western History
    • The History of Christianity
    • Lost Christianities 
  • The Loyalists of Thule
    • A History of Hitler’s Empire
    • World War II - A Military and Social History
  • The Lucifuge
    • Why Evil Exists
  • Maiden’s Blood Sisterhood (Source)
    • How to Become a Superstar Student
    • The Modern Political Tradition
  • Malleus Maleficarum
    • The History of Christianity
    • Lost Christianities 
    • Why Evil Exists
  • The Merrick Institute (Source)
    • Medical School for Everyone - Pediatric Grand Rounds 
    • Secrets to Sleep Science
  • Network Zero
    • Internet History, Technology, and Security
  • Night Watch (Source)
    • Why Evil Exists
  • Null Mysteriis
    • Animal Behaviour
    • Introduction to Forensics
    • Mountains 101 
  • Otodo (Source)
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History 
    • Why Evil Exists
  • The Promethean Brotherhood  (Source)
    • Decoding the Secrets of Egyptian Hieroglyphs
    • Greek 101
    • Latin 101
    • Miracles of Human Language - An Introduction to Linguistics 
    • The Story of Human Language
  • Protectors of the Light (Source)
    • Indigenous Canada 
  • The Reckoning (Source)
    • Heroes and Legends - The Most Influential Characters in Literature
  • The Scarlet Watch (Source)
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
  • Task Force VALKYRIE
    • Crash Course US Government & Politics 
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • World War II - A Military and Social History
  • Talbot Group (Source)
    • Psychological First Aid
  • The Union
    • Cities Are Back in Town - Urban Sociology
  • Utopia Now (Source)
    • Great Works of Utopian and Dystopian Literature
  • Vanguard Serial Crimes Unit (Source) 
    • Introduction to Forensics
    • The Vault: The FBI’s online archive of popular declassified documents. Lots of weird stuff, and the perfect source of inspiration for VSCU.
  • Yuri’s Group (Source)
    • De-Mystifying Mindfullness
    • Healing with the Arts
    • How Music Can Change Your Life
  • Dark Eras
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • History of Ancient Egypt
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Indigenous Canada
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History
  • Signature Settings
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition

Mage the Awakening

  • General
    • Addiction and the Brain: Mage 2e’s theme is “Addicted to Mysteries.” Understanding that addiction is a good place to start. 
    • The Addictive Brain
    • Ancient Philosophy - Aristotle & His Successors
    • Ancient Philosophy - Plato & His Predecessors: If there is one course on philosophy you take for Mage, it should probably be this one. At four lessons, this is a pretty quick one to complete. 
    • Gnosticism - From Nag Hammadi to the Gospel of Judas
    • Magic in the Middle Ages
  • Dark Eras
    • Great Zimbabwe in Historical Archaeology
    • History of Ancient Egypt
    • Introduction to Ancient Greek History
    • Politics and Long-Distance Trade in the Mwene Mutapa Empire
    • World War II - A Military and Social History
  • Signature Settings
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Hollywood: History, Industry, Art
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History

Mummy the Curse

  • General
    • Archaeology - An Introduction to the World’s Greatest Sites: Let’s go find some Relics!
    • History of Ancient Egypt
    • Introduction Ancient Egypt and Its Civilisation
    • Soul Beliefs 1 - Historical Foundations
    • Soul Beliefs 2 - Belief Systems
    • Soul Beliefs 3 - How Does It All End?
  • Dark Eras
    • The Early Middle Ages (284-1000)
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • The Great War
    • Great Zimbabwe in Historical Archaeology
    • Ottoman Empire
    • Politics and Long-Distance Trade in the Mwene Mutapa Empire
  • Signature Settings
    • The American Revolution
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition

Promethean the Created

  • General
    • Introduction to the Biology of Cancer
    • Understanding Cancer Metastasis
  • Dark Eras
    • African-American History: From Emancipation to the Present
    • Epidemics in Western Society since 1600
  • Signature Settings
    • Antarctica: From Geology to Human History
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • National Geographic Polar Explorations: Follow the steps of Doctor Frankenstein. 
    • World War II - A Military and Social History
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History

Werewolf the Forsaken

  • General
    • Animal Behaviour
  • Dark Eras
    • African-American History: From Emancipation to the Present
    • The Ancient Near East - History, Society, and Economy
    • Cybele: The Great Mother of the Augustan Order
    • The Great War
    • Hardcore History - Punic Nightmares
    • The Early Middle Ages (284-1000)
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
  • Signature Settings
    • The Civil War and Reconstruction Eras
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Mountains 101: An awesome course in general, but especially useful for Werewolf’s signature setting, the Colorado Rockies. 
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History
    • War for the Greater Middle East

Vampire the Requiem

  • General
  • Clans
    • Animal Behaviour
    • History of Ancient Egypt
    • Introduction Ancient Egypt and Its Civilisation
  • Carthian Movement
  • Circle of the Crone
    • Magic in the Middle Ages
  • Invictus
  • Lancea et Sanctum
    • Magic in the Middle Ages
  • Ordo Dracul
    • Ottoman Empire
  • Dark Eras
    • African-American History: From Emancipation to the Present
    • The Civil War and Reconstruction Eras
    • The Early Middle Ages (284-1000)
    • Epidemics in Western Society since 1600
    • The Great War
    • Living in the French Revolution and the Age of Napoleon
    • Ottoman Empire
    • Digital Tour of Tutor London
  • Signature Settings
    • Foundations of Eastern Civilization
    • History of the United States 2nd Edition
    • Introduction to Ancient Greek History
    • Understanding Japan - A Cultural History