the darks on my screen are DARK

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rogue one + last words

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Prepping your print from file to finish:

I always hear people complaining about how much better the piece looked digitally, SO, here is a run down on how to get prints that look more like your original piece.

First of all, every printer is different.  Every paper is different.  Make sure you take the time to do test prints and become familiar with how your printer and paper combo work, as you’ll rarely nail a print your first try.  This one took about 5 test prints before I was confident to print on the expensive large paper Every time I mess up on a print, I save the remaining paper to use as scraps for test prints.

As you can see, the original piece looks very nice!  The focus is super strongly on the tiger, and all of the vibrant colors are still super evident in the background.  That said, when I print it as is, everything about 85% gray or darker turns BLACK.  And this is high quality paper designed to get accurate vibrant colors, too.

The best way to fix this is to do layer effects.  Brightness/contrast is my favorite, as a typical piece will generally print about 5x better if you up the brightness to around 15-25, and adjust the contrast up or down by 5-10 points.  That said, if you have a HIGH contrast piece (Darks against brights) like this one, you typically need to do a few more steps.

Often I’ll do a second brightness/contrast adjustment layer and push brightness to an obnoxious level so the darkest darks are closer to a mid-dark range.  From there, I’ll create a mask and use a transparent gradient tool to slowly pull back the brightness on all of the lighter areas of the image.

Additionally, due to printers using CMYK and your screen being RBG certain colors just physically CANNOT print.  Some people will always work in CMYK because of this, but honestly I like my saturated colors and most of my work is intended to be seen digitally so I only ever work in RGB.  Photoshop has a nifty toggle (Ctrl + Y) where you can toggle between CMYK and RGB view to see how your piece will appear when it prints.  It’s useful to check this because if you worked in a color that cannot replicate in print, you may want to shift it entirely before you even bother printing.

Artwork tends to desaturate a bit as it prints, so I’ll often make a Hue/saturation layer to play with, too.  In this case the image was already pretty damn saturated, BUT some of the shadows on the tiger were printing more brown than orange, so I adjusted the saturation a bit to keep them vibrant with the rest of the image.
**DO NOT use “Lightness” to lighten your image!  It basically adds a white overlay to your image.  Always use Brightness, instead.

After all of that, I have a final print that much more closely captures the essence of the original painting.  I could have tinkered even more, but to me the goal is a good print rather than an exact copy. 

For ULTRA high contrast images, like a dark room looking out into a snowy exterior, expect to do a LOT of adjustment to get it to print correctly.  Printers just aren’t too fond of super darks right up against super lights.

I could make a proper tutorial on this if people request it.  Mostly, just wanted to put my thoughts down in one spot!

9

VFD: The Fire-Fighting Side

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Baskerville. It’s like, it’s in the same family as Times New Roman, but it’s not as like formal, and it doesn’t have like that, ‘Oh God, it reminds me of like homework and formal things.’ […] And then I added a vapourwave grid […] and some dramatic cloud at the top. And I was like, ‘You know what, you know what? Baskerville. That might be it. Baskerville, yes.’ So I did that.

For @beeghosts, my match for the JSAMN Fanart Exchange 2017. The prompt I chose was: Segundus against a millefleur background. (Millefleur translates from French as ‘thousand flowers’.)

I wasn’t familiar with millefleur before the exchange and while I’m aware my gift doesn’t exactly match the tapestry style, I hope you still like it @beeghosts! Inspired by some of the pieces, I’ve hidden a few things within the flowers ;)

THE LAYERS CHEAT SHEET PART TWO
(PART ONE HERE)

Once again, I’m no expert- there are things about these layers I probably haven’t covered, so please try them out for yourself!

Layers 1-7 help your contrast. They are usually a pair of the former two groups I went over in my last post.

1. OVERLAY:  Helps your contrast by boosting your lights and darks, while the more mid tone pixels aren’t affected as much. It does this based on the layers beneath it.  “Screens” the lights, “multiplies” the darks. 
2. SOFT LIGHT:  Similar to overlay, but a “softer” effect. You can think of soft light as more transparent.
3. HARD LIGHT: You can look at hard light as an intense version of overlay, with much brighter colors and a much less transparent look.
4. VIVID LIGHT:  This is the heavy metal version of overlay- think of it similar to color dodge and color burn.  Very intense colors, good for finding interesting lighting and color combos.
5. LINEAR LIGHT:  Crazy amounts of contrast and color is added here, even more than vivid light.  so heavy metal 
6. PIN LIGHT:  This one is interesting because besides it also being an intense contrast layer, it can add random noise to the active layer.  Apparently this is a combo of the lighten blend mode on the light pixels and darken on the dark pixels, but the noise effect is what makes it really interesting imo.
7. HARD MIX:  You will turn this mode on and be like “no” but it is actually adjusting its fill will reveal another overlay-ish type layer.  It throws the colors on the active layer towards a more primary color such as blue, or magenta. 
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8. DIFFERENCE: This will invert your colors, taking into account the layers below. If colors are very close, they will be black.
9. EXCLUSION: This also inverts your colors, taking into account the layers below. If colors are very close, they are grey. Exclusion and difference are layers that would be good for graphic pieces, I haven’t really gotten used to incorporating them in my painting workflow.
10. SUBTRACT: Similar to the above layers, but more intense. You will notice that the darker you make your active layer with Difference, exclusion, and subtract, the lighter and more transparent looking the result will be.
11. DIVIDE:  Divide, however, usually results in crazy highlights that are pretty opaque unless the layer is fairly light, and then it will begin to go transparent. 
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12. HUE:  Makes the lower layer take on the hue of the active layer.
13. SATURATION:  The lower layers take on the saturation of the active layer.
14. COLOR:  The lower layers take on the color of the active layer.
15. LUMINOSITY:  The lower layers take on the luminosity, or brightness, of the active layer.


Once again, I’m no expert, but I hope this helps. Thanks guys!
http://drawmaevedraw.tumblr.com/

anonymous asked:

your comic of long haired mob and reigen is AMAZING! if you dont mind me asking, how did you make the colors in your comics look uniform (ie: blue in that one comic) and yet still recognizable of their original/normal color palettes, did you use a layer mode? or something else?

OKAY THIS IS. a challenging question to answer, even though it’s easy in practice.

The Doozy ABoT comic is a bit of an exception to the rule of how I color in general, but I can show you a glimpse into how that color process went. Also I use Sai for everything listed.

I’m using a picture I haven’t colored/merged yet to show what I mean, since you need to keep the lineart separate for my process to work. You can see how I color lineart here. Here it’s just at 30% lumi&shade.

Ya start with ur flats. Rad. (and always have backup flats on a duplicated layer)

getcha some faded blue set on a grouped screen layer.

Some faded blue on a multiply layer

(this is where i divulge from how i usually color comics, to be continued below **)

Because the comic was a night scene, i leave the darks/contrast as is, since you lose a majority of it in dark scenes, and just apply an orange screen layer where the light’s gonna hit them.

select the inverse of that (with some space to give that weird shade-line in my stuff) and add some more blue on a screen layer and viola! you got my basic process for coloring that comic. and you didn’t even have to do much to preserve the original color palettes in people’s minds.

**back to how i normally color comics (here i used faded purple on my screen/multiply layers)

your average scene is very well lit, so it’s important to show the regular contrast as is. so – you get your sucker all done up, then

you adjust the brightness/contrast/color deepen until it reflects the difference you started with. now u have your original set of hues looking like it got passed through a purple color filter, but functioning better imo.

I personally like it a little toned down, so I add back in some of that reserve flat layer. I eyeball it, but this was around 52% opacity.

Multiply layer where your shades go. (with more faded purple)

Luminosity layer on top of the shades to make that solid line in my darks I was talkin about. (with even more faded purple)

And you can have an optional screen layer in the highlights (by selecting the inverse of your shade layer.) Here I used yellow bc why not. 

That is the other important thing about my art. My shades and highlights are kept to 1-2 colors. Here it’s orange and green

Here it’s blue and red. The simplicity looks better to my eyes.

aight you made it to the bottom go treat urself to smth nice

Daily Draw February - Day 23

Fenris companion card - Act1

“My name is Fenris. These men were Imperial bounty hunters seeking to recover a magister’s lost property, namely myself.

It’s done! And it was so fast to work on, I still can’t believe it! Good news folks, I’m officially ready to take card commissions :D The new info should be up in a few days!

Also, this was an absolutely delight to do. And I didn’t think I could love Fenris more than I did.

Link and Fairies!

Redraw!