the xx factor

slate.com
A New Commemorative Coin Depicts Lady Liberty as a Black Woman, and It’s Gorgeous
To commemorate its 225th anniversary, the U.S. Mint has introduced a collectors’ coin that marks a significant departure from every other American coin: It depicts Lady Liberty as a black woman. In an image designed by Justin Kunz, the new Lady Liberty gazes off into the distance beneath the word “LIBERTY.” Her hair, in twists, is pulled back into a loose bun; she wears a toga and a headband of stars. The value inscribed on the coin is $100, but because it is made of 24-karat gold, its actual worth is closer to $1,200. It would be easy to dismiss the coin as meaningless: The U.S. Mint’s insistence on representing freedom with a fictional “lady” is anachronistic at best and troubling at worst, and commemorative coins aren’t exactly the beating heart of popular culture. Even so, the new Lady Liberty coin feels like an enormous symbolic step, somehow both urgent and long overdue. If we’re going to keep on depicting liberty as a woman, she ought to reflect the appearance of America’s actual women, not the tired, racist beauty standard embraced by our Founding Fathers................ Click the link to read more

Originally posted by realitytvgifs

slate.com
A Lament for Hillary Clinton, the Woman
There is a lot to mourn in this sickening moment in American history. After Tuesday night, it becomes much harder to believe that America is even tryin ...

“ The shattering of one woman’s career aspirations are no tragedy compared with the globally catastrophic effects of a Trump presidency or even just the awful knowledge that half of the American people are on his side. But I can’t help thinking right now about Hillary Clinton as a person, rather than a symbol. She’s a woman who stayed so strong for so many years, but who is, after all, only human. And she’s a woman who many of us have grown to love.”

slate.com
Why Do Pro-Life Activists Seem Only to Care About Unborn Lives?
In my comparative ethics course, I use abortion as a case study. We consider Christian arguments, Buddhist arguments.

“ … Why, as I look out on the sea of signs at today’s the March for Life, do I see nothing about maternity leave, much less paternity leave? Why aren’t expansive parental leave policies front and center on every pro-life website, and on the lips of every pro-life politician? … “

“ … Why does every speaker fail to mention contraception? Why isn’t sex education front and center on every pro-life website, and on the lips of every pro-life politician? … “

“ … Why is adoption mentioned only in passing, if it is mentioned at all? As of this writing, MarchForLife.org’s “adoption” page still has “lorem ipsum” placeholder text. … “

“ … Why, if your movement “welcomes everyone,” as Ted Cruz and Cardinal Timothy Dolan both emphasized, do you focus so much on the Christian God? … “

“ … In the (viral) words of Sister Joan Chittister:

I do not believe that just because you’re opposed to abortion, that that makes you pro-life. In fact, I think in many cases, your morality is deeply lacking if all you want is a child born but not a child fed, not a child educated, not a child housed. And why would I think that you don’t? Because you don’t want any tax money to go there. That’s not pro-life. That’s pro-birth. We need a much broader conversation on what the morality of pro-life is. … “

“ … To anyone looking in from the outside, the movement seems to be more about making public declarations of pious conservatism than advocating for life. It is, at heart, a religious movement, which explains the absence of contraception and sex education from the platform. It is also a politically conservative movement, which values small government more than the souls of unborn children and seeks to do little for them once they are born. … “

Read The Rest

Phroyd

slate.com
Forget This “Hillary Is Unlikable” Stuff. Hillary Is Downright Inspiring.

I am not saying Hillary deserves credit just for showing up and getting the job done. I am saying she deserves credit for showing up and getting the job done while a psychopath invaded her personal space, lied repeatedly, attempted to degrade her in the basest and vilest terms, and threatened to jail her for the crime of being a successful woman in the public eye. Nor am I saying that we all ought to live up to Hillary’s example: Crying and despairing are a completely reasonable response to being attacked and denigrated by a sexist pig. Not all of us have the guts and, yes, stamina to endure and overcome what Hillary is enduring and overcoming in this election. But that’s the point: Hillary has displayed superhuman strength in the face of disgusting, unfair, and false attacks on her character and judgment. If that’s not inspiring, I don’t know what is.

slate.com
Forget This “Hillary Is Unlikable” Stuff. Hillary Is Downright Inspiring.
Expectations for this election have become so warped that the primary conclusions media commentators took away from the second debate were that it had ...

Expectations for this election have become so warped that the primary conclusions media commentators took away from the second debate were that it had been an ugly, uninspiring affair and that Trump didn’t lose. Let’s set aside the absurdity that a man who brought up his own tax scandal unbidden, who threatened to jail his opponent, who betrayed his absolute ignorance of the nuances of the war in Syria, and whose best zinger amounted to recalling that Abraham Lincoln’s nickname was “Honest Abe” somehow fought to a draw with his opponent. Trump was as ugly and uninspiring as usual. But here’s what people haven’t been saying in the days since the debate: Hillary was inspiring as all get out.

Yes, I’m familiar with all the arguments against Hillary as inspirer-in-chief. She’s part of the establishment. She’s laden with potential conflicts of interest. Her judgment during the whole email thing was poor. She seems, to many observers, wooden and robotic. Fine. The fact remains that Hillary stood onstage and calmly and persuasively made the case for her candidacy while her looming, lurching, lunatic opponent attempted to humiliate her in front of the entire world. If Hillary can do that, then the rest of us can do whatever we put our minds to.

Put yourself in Hillary’s shoes for a moment. You’re 68 years old. You have spent decades—decades—in the public eye, absorbing criticism from every possible angle. Your opponent is an impulsive, amoral ignoramus with a long history of humiliating women. He has made it his strategy during this debate to dredge up what are probably the darkest moments of your personal life—your husband’s affairs and alleged sexual assaults—as evidence of your failures as a wife and as a woman. He has brought three of these women to sit in the front row during the debate in an attempt to throw you off guard and cow you into submission. He literally tells you to your face that he will imprison you if he wins the election.

What would you do? If I were Hillary, I would blubber incomprehensibly through my rage-tears for the duration of the debate, if I lasted onstage that long. What did Hillary do? She stood tall and looked comfortable. She listened carefully to the voters who were asking her questions and offered them empathetic, intelligent, and articulate answers. She serenely and thoughtfully enumerated the character faults that make Trump unfit for office. She laughed it off when Trump insulted her in the most personal of terms. And at the end, she complimented him on his children. Never mind that his children don’t really deserve that compliment—Hillary responded to undeniably sexist personal attacks that are unprecedented in the history of modern American politics with an inspiring level of grace and poise.

I am not saying Hillary deserves credit just for showing up and getting the job done. I am saying she deserves credit for showing up and getting the job done while a psychopath invaded her personal space, lied repeatedly, attempted to degrade her in the basest and vilest terms, and threatened to jail her for the crime of being a successful woman in the public eye. Nor am I saying that we all ought to live up to Hillary’s example: Crying and despairing are a completely reasonable response to being attacked and denigrated by a sexist pig. Not all of us have the guts and, yes, stamina to endure and overcome what Hillary is enduring and overcoming in this election. But that’s the point: Hillary has displayed superhuman strength in the face of disgusting, unfair, and false attacks on her character and judgment. If that’s not inspiring, I don’t know what is.

slate.com
Dieting and Weight Talk Are Bad for All Adolescents, Says American Academy of Pediatrics
On Monday, the American Academy of Pediatrics published new recommendations for “Preventing Obesity and Eating Disorders in Adolescents.” The recommend ...

This is why I’m resistant to the idea of letting thin people have easy access into the fat positive community.  This right here is one of those “no freaking duh” studies, that are important to convince thin people that shaming and diet talk isn’t a good idea.  For people who aren’t or have never been fat, having diet talk with kids is often considered no big deal.  “It’s just trying to help them reach the weight they want, they want to be thin, they must be unhealthy” are the common phrases and with the “allies” who are anything but, it usually goes like “letting your kid be fat is child abuse.”

Which demonstrates a huge disconnect between fat and thin people, thin people see weight loss talk of any kind as benign or even helpful, whereas fat people don’t.  All too often they don’t understand about fat blaming in doctors, clothing stores or anything else.  When you peel back a layer or two, most people who don’t know what it’s like to be fat too often fall back on the “it’s for your own good, you’re not trying hard enough argument” and they’re unwilling to listen until these kinds of studies are created.  For people who want to be allies in the fat positive community, listen to us, don’t just assume you know better than we do.  Please.

We have an anti that holds an ‘Ask to see your Ultrasound’ sign outside the clinic.  The clinic director passed us a note, wanting us to tell this anti that yes, many women do want to see the ultrasound, and we always let them if they want to.  They still continue with the abortion after looking at the ultrasound
— 

From another escort.

This is a common trope in anti-choice lore.  If patients see the ultrasound, if patients see their babies, they will change their mind. 

They site number like “More than 90% of women change their mind about abortion after the ultrasound.”

This is false. 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2014/01/09/ultrasound_viewing_before_an_abortion_a_new_study_finds_that_for_a_small.html

“ This latest study is much larger. Researchers analyzed 15,575 medical records from an urban abortion care provider in Los Angeles. Each patient seeking an abortion was asked how she felt about her choice: Those who made “clear and confident” replies were rated as having “high decision certainty,” while those who seemed sad, angry, or ambivalent were said to show “medium” or “low” decision certainty. (Only 7.4 percent of the women fell into the latter categories.) Patients underwent ultrasounds as part of the standard procedure, and 42.5 percent of them opted to see the images. Of those, 98.4 percent terminated their pregnancies; 99 percent of the women who did not look at the photographs ended their pregnancies. But here’s the thing: The women who viewed the sonograms and then backed out were all part of that 7.4 percent of women with low or medium decision certainty. Women who knew abortion was the right decision for them continued with the procedure whether they were shown the images or not. “

  “The main takeaway here is definitely that 98.4 percent of the women who saw their ultrasounds went on to get an abortion anyway.“ 

This doesn’t stop anti’s from saying it, but again, it is false.