the words of allah

‏ما دام الله معك لا يهمك شخصاً آذاك.
As long as Allah is with you, don’t worry about those who hurt you.

ما دام الله يحفظك لا تحزن على أحد أهملك
As long as Allah is protecting you, don’t become sad over someone who dominates you.

وما دام الله يريد لك شيئاً فلن يقف في وجهك شيء أبداً.
As long as Allah wants something for you, nothing will ever stand in your way.

Masterpost: Islamic Concepts, Words & Phrases!

So, as promised, here’s the masterpost of the different, most common, types of concepts, words and phrases that we, as Muslims, use in our day to day speak, and perform on the daily. The reason for this masterpost is so that, if and when Season 4 airs, and if it is about Sana, then most likely, these words and phrases, or concepts, may be commonly used/addressed, so it’s always nice to just, have a reference, I guess, of their meaning, so that you can understand the context and definition a little better! 

CONCEPTS.

Islam: The word “Islam” in itself means to submit, to surrender - to give yourself over to Allah, to feel the peace that giving yourself over to Allah brings to you.

Allah: The Arabic word for God.

Muhammad (sal’lalaahu alayhi wasalam): The final prophet sent down by Allah to mankind, with the religion of Islam. (sal’lalaahu alayhi wasalam), or sometimes seen as Muhammad (SAW) means ‘peace be upon him’, which you’ll sometimes see as Muhammad (PBUH). It is an extension we add on to the name Muhammad, whenever the prophet Muhammad (SAW) is being referred to, out of respect.

“The 5 Pillars of Islam”: These are, in essence, the 5 core aspects of Islam, that every Muslim must believe in, and do to their full potential, unless it is detrimental to their health, or they are unable to do so due to a lack of wealth:

  • Shahaadah - This is the very core belief of a Muslim. They “must testify and bear witness that there is no deity but Allah, and that Muhammad (SAW) is his worshipper and messenger.”
  • Salah - The 5 daily prayers, which must be read. These are Fajr (the prayer we read before sunrise), Zauhar (the midday prayer), Asr (the late afternoon prayer), Maghrib (the prayer we read before sunset) and Isha (the night prayer). Each of these prayers are signalled when the Adhaan (the call to prayer) is heard, and before performing these prayers, Wudhu (ablution) must be made.
  • Zakah - Alms, charity. Every year, we must take a portion of money out from our combined wealth that we own to give to charity to the poor and needy. Of course, to do that, Islam sets certain rules on how much wealth you must have in order to classify if whether you are in a position where you can give charity or not.
  • Sawm -  Fasting in the month of Ramadhan. Ramadhan is the 9th month of the Islamic calendar, whereby the start and the end of it is marked by the sighting of the crescent moon. During Ramadhan, Muslims all over the world must fast from sunrise to sunset, abstaining from food, water, sex and sin. They must instead increase their worshipping of Allah, by performing Salah and increasing their Tilaawat (reading of the Qur’aan), Tasbeeh (praising of Allah) and indulge themselves as much as they can within Islam. Suhoor (morning meal) is the meal we eat before sunrise happens, kind of like a breakfast, before we begin our fast for the day, and Iftaar (evening meal) is the meal we eat to break our fast, just as sunset is about to occur. Taraweeh is an additional compulsory Salah that Muslims must pray in Ramadhan (since this Salah is only read during Ramadhan, and in no other month beside it) after the Isha Salah. The end of Ramadhan is marked with Eid ul Fitr, the first of our 2 Eids that we have within the year, a celebration! The fasts in Ramadhan are only compulsory on people that are physically and mentally healthy enough to do them. 
  • Hajj - The 5 day sacred pilgrimage that takes place in the final month of the Islamic calendar, once a year. Muslims all over the world travel to Saudi Arabia, more specifically, Makkah and the surrounding cities near it, to perform their Hajj. Only those that are physically and mentally healthy, and that can afford the Hajj, will find it compulsory on them to do so. Our 2nd Eid, Eid ul Adha is celebrated on the 3rd day of Hajj, by remembering the sacrifice that the Prophets Ibrahim (Abraham) and his son, Ismail (Ishmael) were to make. 

Qur’aan: The Holy Book of Islam. It is considered to be Allah’s final word, and the final, unchanged Holy Book that was sent down via Angel Jibra’eel (Angel Gabriel) to the Prophet Muhammad (SAW). 

Hadeeth: The teachings and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) that were reported by his close family and friends.

Sunnah: The beloved actions of the Prophet Muhammad (SAW) that were reported by his close family and friends.

Shari’ah Law: The Islamic ruling. Any Muslim country will most likely be governed by the Shari’ah Law. However, its not just people living in a Muslim state that must abide by the Shari’ah Law. Muslims all over the world must try their best to abide by it too. The Shari’ah Law is based upon the teachings of the Qur’aan, which hold the most weight in Islam, with a little understanding from the Hadeeth and Sunnah, in terms of how to apply these Laws.

Jihad: The word itself means to struggle, to battle. There are 2 types:

  • Jihad Kabeera: The Greater Struggle/Battle - this is the one we as Muslims face on a daily basis, within ourselves, to better ourselves as believers of Allah, to always do the right thing by Islam, which is something that affects us on a daily basis, especially if we live in the West, since we face the battle of living in the Western society, as well as being Muslims, and choosing to do the right thing. 
  • Jihad Sagheera: The Lesser Struggle/Battle - this is the one where we proactively, as Muslims, must fight against anyone who wrongfully says ill about Islam. In it, we must take care that we are not hurting those, who have not hurt us, but rather, that we fight against the common prejudices, stigmas and stereotypes that are placed on Islam and Muslims. 

Hijaab: The headpiece the women of Islam are recognised by. However, hijaab is not just that. Hijaab is also in the way we dress modestly, the way we must act modestly, the way we must speak modestly, because the woman’s modesty in Islam is very, very highly valued and respected. Men are told lower their gazes in front of women. 

Niqaab: The face veil that some, not all, but some Muslim women choose to wear, if they want to.

Burqa: The long material that covers the head and reaches thigh length, that some women, again, choose to wear, if they don’t want to wear the Hijaab, but something a bit more looser and covering.

Abayah: The long “dress” the women wear, on top of their usual clothes. Most of the times, these are black, with several printed or embroidered designs on them for more fancier wear, or sometimes they are simple, for more everyday wear. Not all women wear an abayah, and not every abayah is black in colour.

Thobe/Jubbah: Kind of like an abayah, but for men? I guess? It’s a long stitched garment, that comes in many different colours, mostly neautrals, like white, gray, beige, black, blues, greens etc, that men wear. Muslim men in the East wear this more frequently than Muslim men in the West, but Muslim men in the West would most likely wear this on Friday, Ramadhan, and Eid - on sacred occasions.

Dua: Prayers. So, when you raise your hands and pray to Allah, and ask anything of him and remember the people who you want to remember in your prayers to Allah.

Jummah: It means Friday, which is the holy day for Muslims. Kind of like Sabbath, I guess. On Fridays, instead of the Zauhar prayer, men normally go to the Masjid (the mosque) to offer Jummah Salah (The Friday Prayer), where the Imam (the person leading the prayer) will give a Kutbah (a short sermon) regarding a specific topic to do with Islam.

Masjid: The Mosque. This is where Muslims gather to pray Salah 5 times a day.

Madressah: Islamic schooling - so, Islamic classes that, most often, take place inside the Masjid, i.e, the mosque, when it is not being used by the general Muslim public to offer Salah.

WORDS & PHRASES.

As-salaamu’alaikum Warahmatullahi Wabarakaatuhu: This is a greeting, both used as a hello and a goodbye between Muslims. As-salaamu’alaikum - May peace be upon you, Warahmatullahi - And Allah’s mercy, Wabarakaatuhu - And his blessings. Usually though, most people will only say/use As-salaamu’alaikum.

Allah Hafiz: May Allah protect you. This is another greeting we have that Muslims use as a goodbye.

Bismillah hirahmaa niraheem: In the name of Allah, the most Merciful, the Most Kind. It’s a phrase we use/say when we’re about to start something, we start whatever we do in the name of Allah, by remembering him so that whatever we’re doing will have a successful outcome. Somtimes, we just say Bismillah, in short, which just means, In the Name of Allah.

Subhanallah: Glory be to Allah. This is a Tasbeeh (a praise of Allah) that is said when something overwhelms you, so much so, that you literally have to take a moment and glorify Allah for having that thing overwhelm you, whether it be someone’s beauty, something’s beauty, or something that’s happened that’s overwhelmed you in a really positive way.

Alhamdulillah: All praises be to Allah. This is a Tasbeeh that’s said when you’re thankful for something. Thankful for anything or anyone, for food, for good health, after we sneeze we say Alhamdulillah, or if someone is asking you how you are, you can simply reply back by saying Alhamdulillah, and they’ll understand that you are in good health, or if someone is offering you something extra, like food, for example, then you can simply say Alhamdulillah, and they’ll understand that you’re content with the amount you have.

Allahu Akbar: Allah is the Greatest. This is another Tasbeeh, but it’s used in quite versatile ways. It’s the first and last phrases of the Adhaan, it’s said in Salah, but it’s also used in daily speak too, most often when we want to reaffirm our belief in Allah, to remind ourselves that, Allah is our sole keeper of destiny, and that, sometimes, things we don’t anticipate can happen too. It’s a resounding statement of faith, that can invoke feelings of strength when it is needed, telling you to reevaluate where your faith is at. Or if something that you can’t believe is happening, you’ll say Allahu Akbar, to express your disbelief in it.

Insha’allah: If Allah wills. This is something we say when we’re thinking about the future, and we hope that the way we think about the future is something Allah is willing to offer us. Kind of like a “I don’t wanna jinx it”.

Mash’allah: Allah has willed. This is something we say out of respect for a situation, if it’s gone in favour of someone else we’re speaking to, or if we’re appreciating someone, whether it be their beauty or their character. It’s a way of showing someone that you’re extremely happy that Allah has willed for something to go their way. 

Wallah: I swear by Allah. It’s something you say when you’re absolutely serious about something, because you are swearing to Allah about it, you are keeping Allah as your witness about it.

Astagfirullah: I seek forgiveness from Allah. This is said when you’re repenting to Allah, or someone else may say this to you if they’re reminding you of something wrong that you did/are doing, not as a way to patronise, but to remind you that you have a choice in not doing that wrong thing either.

Jazakallah Khair: May Allah reward you with the best (of rewards). This is said in place of thank you, when you’re thanking someone for something, Most people sometimes just say Jazakallah, or either Baarakallah (May Allah’s blessings be upon you.)

Ameen: Amen. Something you say when you’re agreeing with something, or accepting something from someone.

Mubarak: Glad tidings/Congratulations. Usually you’ll hear people say this in Ramadhan or Eid, to each other, or if someone tells someone else they’re going for Hajj/have come back from Hajj, you’ll hear the phrases:  Ramadhan Mubarak, Eid Mubarak, Hajj Mubarak etc, but generally, it’s just used as way of saying congrats.

Nikah: Wedding.The actual wedding ceremony.

Ammi: Mum.

Abba: Dad.

Habibi/Habibti: The Most Beloved. Where Habibi is the masculine term, and Habibti is the feminine term. It’s not just said to the person you love romantically, it can be said platonically too, and quite often, is.

‏ربي اسألك هدوء النفس وحياة مليئة بكل ما يرضيك.

My Lord, I ask You for a calm soul and a life that’s filled with everything that pleases You.

Depression and Loneliness

“أَعُوذُ بِكَلِمَاتِ اللهِ التَّامَّاتِ مِنْ غَضَبِهِ وَعِقَابِهِ، وَشَرِّ عِبَادِهِ، وَمِنْ هَمَزَاتِ الشَّيَاطِينِ وَأَنْ يَحْضُرُونِ”.

A'oothu bikalimaatil-laahit-taammaati min ghadhabihi wa ‘iqaabihi, wa sharri ‘ibaadihi, wa min hamazaatish-shayaateeni wa ‘an yahdhuroon.

I seek refuge in the Perfect Words of Allah from His anger and His punishment, from the evil of His slaves and from the taunts of devils and from their presence.

Ref: Abu Dawud 4/12. See also Al-Albani, Sahih At- Tirmithi 3/171

a gentle reminder, 

i know that chris and noora spell insha’allah as “inshalla” in the text, maybe for the effect that they genuinely do not know how to spell insha’allah, but, if you do use the word “insha’allah”, please spell it as “insha’allah” in your gifs/edits/fics/posts etc, because insha’allah contains the word allah, which should be spelt as allah!

thank you! 

Salam, some time ago I started extracting hadiths that belong to the Collection of Imam al-Bukhari out of a website to use it for a smartphone app I was planning. I also thought why not use that to also generate some pdf’s out of it. So thats what I have done here. There is one pdf containing all the books from Sahih al-Bukhari and there is also one pdf for each book of the collection. It only includes the hadith in the english translation, also there is the reference for each hadith (Hadith number of total collection & hadith number in that specific book). When you donwload the pdf you will be able to search through the document to find the hadiths that contain the word or exact phrase you are looking for. In sha Allah someone will benefit out of this. Anyway if you have any remarks or have found something that needs to be corrected, let me know.

(btw. maybe you should click on the download links when you are on wifi as the complete edition is like 13mb and the individual books are like 2mb each)

Download Complete Edition in one (2904 Pages)

You can also Download each Book individually:

Book 1 - Revelation

Book 2 - Belief

Book 3 - Knowledge

Book 4 - Ablutions (Wudu’)

Book 5 - Bathing (Ghusl)

Book 6 - Menstrual Periods

Book 7 - Rubbing hands and feet with dust (Tayammum)

Book 8 - Prayers (Salat)

Book 9 - Times of the Prayers

Book 10 - Call to Prayers (Adhaan)

Book 11 - Friday Prayer

Book 12 - Fear Prayer

Book 13 - The Two Festivals (Eids)

Book 14 - Witr Prayer

Book 15 - Invoking Allah for Rain (Istisqaa)

Book 16 - Eclipses

Book 17 - Prostration During Recital of Qur'an

Book 18 - Shortening the Prayers (At-Taqseer)

Book 19 - Prayer at Night (Tahajjud)

Book 20 - Virtues of Prayer at Masjid Makkah and Madinah

Book 21 - Actions while Praying

Book 22 - Forgetfulness in Prayer

Book 23 - Funerals (Al-Janaa'iz)

Book 24 - Obligatory Charity Tax (Zakat)

Book 25 - Hajj (Pilgrimage)

Book 26 - `Umrah (Minor pilgrimage)

Book 27 - Pilgrims Prevented from Completing the Pilgrimage

Book 28 - Penalty of Hunting while on Pilgrimage

Book 29 - Virtues of Madinah

Book 30 - Fasting

Book 31 - Praying at Night in Ramadaan (Taraweeh)

Book 32 - Virtues of the Night of Qadr

Book 33 - Retiring to a Mosque for Remembrance of Allah

Book 34 - Sales and Trade

Book 35 - Sales when a Price is paid for Goods to be Delivered Later

Book 36 - Shuf'a

Book 37 - Hiring

Book 38 - Transferance of a Debt from One Person to Another

Book 39 - Kafalah

Book 40 - Representation, Authorization, Business by Proxy

Book 41 - Agriculture

Book 42 - Distribution of Water

Book 43 - Loans, Payment of Loans, Freezing of Property

Book 44 - Khusoomaat

Book 45 - Lost Things Picked up by Someone (Luqatah)

Book 46 - Oppressions

Book 47 - Partnership

Book 48 - Mortgaging

Book 49 - Manumission of Slaves

Book 50 - Makaatib

Book 51 - Gifts

Book 52 - Witnesses

Book 53 - Peacemaking

Book 54 - Conditions

Book 55 - Wills and Testaments (Wasaayaa)

Book 56 - Fighting for the Cause of Allah (Jihaad)

Book 57 - One-fifth of Booty to the Cause of Allah (Khumus)

Book 58 - Jizyah and Mawaada'ah

Book 59 - Beginning of Creation

Book 60 - Prophets

Book 61 - Virtues of the Prophet saws and his Companions

Book 62 - Companions of the Prophet

Book 63 - Merits of the Helpers in Madinah (Ansaar)

Book 64 - Military Expeditions led by the Prophet (pbuh)

Book 65 - Prophetic Commentary on the Qur'an

Book 66 - Virtues of the Qur'an

Book 67 - Wedlock, Marriage (Nikaah)

Book 68 - Divorce

Book 69 - Supporting the Family

Book 70 - Food, Meals

Book 71 - Sacrifice on Occasion of Birth (`Aqiqa)

Book 72 - Hunting, Slaughtering

Book 73 - Al-Adha Festival Sacrifice (Adaahi)

Book 74 - Drinks

Book 75 - Patients

Book 76 - Medicine

Book 77 - Dress

Book 78 - Good Manners and Form (Al-Adab)

Book 79 - Asking Permission

Book 80 - Invocations

Book 81 - To make the Heart Tender (Ar-Riqaq)

Book 82 - Divine Will (Al-Qadar)

Book 83 - Oaths and Vows

Book 84 - Expiation for Unfulfilled Oaths

Book 85 - Laws of Inheritance (Al-Faraa'id)

Book 86 - Limits and Punishments set by Allah (Hudood)

Book 87 - Blood Money (Ad-Diyat)

Book 88 - Apostates

Book 89 - (Statements made under) Coercion

Book 90 - Tricks

Book 91 - Interpretation of Dreams

Book 92 - Afflictions and the End of the World

Book 93 - Judgments (Ahkaam)

Book 94 - Wishes

Book 95 - Accepting Information Given by a Truthful Person

Book 96 - Holding Fast to the Qur'an and Sunnah

Book 97 - Oneness, Uniqueness of Allah (Tawheed)

Alot of Muslims think it will be SO EASY to say the Shahaadah when they die. So many of us think it will be a PIECE OF CAKE.

Lets test yourself this:

When u fall down or trip what comes out of ur mouth?
When u drop something & it breaks what do u say?
When ur child spill all their food on the carpet, what do u say?
When someone overtakes u or cuts across ur way, what do u say?
When someone takes ur parking spot?

Do u say ‘Bismillah", “Astaghfirullah’, ‘La ilaha ill Allah” or 'Subhaan Allah’
OR
Do u say “Whoops” “Oh Sugar”.

Do u start swearing uncontrollably?
Do u use a foul word? Or resort to curses?

So in this Dunya while ur 100% awake & alert u cannot control ur tongue, the first thing that rolls of ur tongue is a SWEAR word

WHAT MAKES U THINK U WILL SAY THE SHAHAADAH WHILE UR IN THE THROES OF DEATH, TAKING UR FINAL BREATHS, SEEING THE ANGEL OF DEATH?

Set a good example. Everytime something happens, make sure the words of Allah roll off ur tongue. If u swear or curse in front of ur children they will also imitate u. So set a good example for ur children as well.

May Allah grant us the ability to die with the Shahaadah on our lips.

“So what are you?”

The question which plagued my childhood in suburban Kansas; the ponderance of which led me towards years of agonizing identity searching; the answer to which I still hesitate to deliver.

“So what are you?”

It is an innocent question; one I know I am not alone in hearing the echoes of. But what do I say? “I’m mixed” is the short answer, but it always leads to the question of “With what” so do I say “My mom is white and my dad is brown” but brown isn’t usually specific enough so do I say “my mom is white and my dad’s Pakistani” but that doesn’t flow right because white is a race and Pakistani is a nationality so do I say “my mom’s American and my dad’s Pakistani” but that isn’t true because my dad was born in Canada and he’s lived here his whole life and American sure as hell doesn’t mean white I mean my dad IS American so do I say “My mom’s a white American and my Dad’s Pakistani American” but that just sounds like I’m trying too hard so that’s out of the question and so do I just drop it and leave it at “none of your business” but that’s rude and it’s really such a simple question so what in the hell do I freaking say?

“So what are you?”

It’s a good question, really… why don’t you tell me? I am the alienation that I feel when my mom’s family talks about how dangerous those Muslim immigrants are over dinner and I am the strange sinking feeling in my stomach which occurs when my cousins tell me that whatever I’ve just done is haraam. I am the frustration which clouds me when people around me doubt that I am what the hell I say I am. I am the product of the millisecond long stares of confusion people give me when I tell them the pale as china blonde lady I’m with is my mother and the looks of disgust I get when I, the young, doll eyed light skinned girl, go out to dinner late at night with a big burly middle aged brown man, aka my father. I am the three and a half years it took me to decide what to call the pigmentation of my skin.

I am the sadness which clouds me when one of my Aunties asserts how lucky I am to be so fair skinned. I am the anger I feel each and every time I think about the people who called my full and plump Desi lips fat as a kid and now use copious amounts of lip liner to accentuate their tiny mouths on Snapchat. I am the hours of hoping and praying during and after shootings that it wasn’t a Muslim. I am the incredible lengths I go to, the precise and complex knowledge I feel I must have of my roots in order to truly claim my heritage. I am neither and I am both and I hate it.

“So what are you?”

I can’t stand here and tell you that it is all bad. That would be I lie, for I am also the cool, smooth feeling of the bronze crucifix which sits on one side of my bedroom wall and the sentiment of the words “Allah most merciful” written in beautiful Arabic script on the other. I am my large French hazel eyes and my thick and wavy South Asian hair, my favorite of my features.

I am the pride I feel as I trace my thumb over the intricate embroidery on one of my anarkalis and the anticipation I feel for Christmas as I help line my grandmother’s fireplace with garland. I am the rhythmic clanking of my bangles as I dance to bhangra music at a cousin’s wedding and the clicking of tongues by a sizzling grill as my grandpa flips our burgers during a Sunday night barbeque. I am the flavorful and savory taste of pulao my father makes and the creamy texture of mashed potatoes on Thanksgiving. I am the Maybelline mascara I coat my eyelashes with and the kajal I used to line the edges of my eyes. I am the flavorant meeting of two cultures melting in an incredible country in which such a thing is even possible.

“So what are you?”

God, but what am I thinking? I’m Jackie. I am the impending messiness that is my bedroom. I am my inability to fall the hell asleep before eleven o’clock at night. I am my love for all things fashion and glamour. I am my obnoxiously large collection of makeup. I am my hideous shedding of tears each and every time Spock dies in the Wrath of Khan.

I am my intense love for horror movies and my struggle to move in the dark for two days after watching them. I am my passion for music and Michael J. Fox and Kanye West and my unrequited love for Zayn Malik. I am my collection of records and of 32 scarves which I never wear, my brown riding boots, my belting of Christmas carols in the middle of July, my irrational hatred of algebra, my inability to sleep without my phone being on its charger, the Toll House cookie dough I eat straight from the bag and the four Beatles posters I have hanging in my room.

I am the scent of Aussie conditioner and my clumsy, spacy nature; my obsession with the Kennedys, my adamant love for Diet Dr Pepper, losing myself in my daydreams, my extreme extroversion and procrastination of literally everything, my weakness for Reese’s peanut butter cups, my A to Z knowledge about Mick Jagger, my ever changing mind. I am my dreams and I am my fears and and I am my tenacity and I am my mistakes and my courage and my insecurities and my abilities and my hope … I am so much and yet I am so little. I am me. I am unapologetically and beautifully me.

“So what are you?”

I am Jacqueline Renee and I am what I am and no answer that I give you to this question will make what I am any different.

Basics of understanding Islam ♥

Have you been interested in Islam or just wanting to understand the basics of it, but you are not really sure where to start or who to ask?
This is a quick little Q&A to help you out ♥

1. What is Islam?

Islam is a way of life.

The word ‘Islam’ means to be in ‘submission’ or to ‘surrender’ to God. Therefore the word Islam is not a noun, it is actually a verb! Anyone who ‘surrenders to God’ is seen as practicing Islam ♥

2. What is a Muslim?

The word ‘Muslim’ means ‘one who submits to God’ ♥ It is an adjective describing the person who practices Islam (ie. s/he surrenders to God) ♥

3. What do Muslims believe?

Muslims understand that there is only One God, and He is Omnipotent and the Creator of All ♥

We do not need a medium to pray to God (ie. We do not need to pray to anything else to get to God), we communicate straight to Him ♥ In Islam the more we pray to God and the more good we do, the closer we can become to Him ♥

In many religions the belief of humans being impure and unable to communicate with God directly, is rejected entirely in Islam ♥

Why would God Create you with His Own Hands, to then call you too dirty and impure to speak to Him?

In Islam, we know God is Merciful ♥

“And We have already created man and know what his soul whispers to him, and We are closer to him than [his] jugular vein.”
Quran (50:16) ♥

4. Who is ‘Allah’?

‘Allah’ is the Aramaic word for ‘God’ ♥ When a Muslim or anyone says the Name ‘Allah’, they are saying ‘God’ in another language ♥

Allah = God ♥

5. Why do most Muslim girls, especially, cover their hair? What is that called?

The covering of the hair and certain parts of the body is called ‘Hijab’ ♥ The word ‘Hijab’ means ‘veil’ or ‘curtain’ ♥

God Created girls in a certain way and means to protect them from the potential ‘badness’ of men and other outside elements by veiling them ♥ Girls do not need to wear Hijab fully infront of other girls and their close family members, it is only infront of strange men, as it is a ward to potentially being sexually/in other ways used and/or hurt/taken advantage of ♥

For more information about Hijab and the Elevation of Women in Islam, please read my following blog post:
http://islam-for-girls.tumblr.com/post/123625392540/islam-brings-elevation-to-the-status-of-women

6. What is the defining characteristic of someone who is truly Muslim?

Peacefulness ♥

“Allah is gentle and loves gentleness in all things.”
(Bukhari and Muslim)

“And We have sent you (O Muhammad ) not but as a mercy for the Aalameen (mankind, jinns and all that exists)”
Quran (21:107)

For more a little more information about Mercy in Islam, please read the following blog post:
http://islam-for-girls.tumblr.com/post/145378234040/the-m-in-muslim-stands-for-mercy

7. Why does the media speak so badly about Islam at times?

People would do a lot of things to get ‘buzz’ about their article, their blog/media posts, and just plainly themselves ♥ Islam is a hot topic word these days, and people like to misquote Quranic verses and Hadith to make themselves more popular and/or to stir controversy for their own reasons.

People who understand that they should not believe everything that they hear on T.V. or simply just in the media, will research the topics of confusion themselves and realise that the information on the media is incorrect and created, not for educational purposes, but rather entertainment and popularity ♥

If you are not Muslim but you are reading this blog post for your own educational purposes, I commend you and thank you greatly for your open-mindedness, and May God Reward you ♥

If you wish to understand the so-called ‘Sword Verses’ of the Quran, please read the following blog post:
http://islam-for-girls.tumblr.com/post/145999716790/sword-verses-explained-its-by-time-people

Thank you for reading this blog post ♥ I will be God Willing writing another blog posts about the basic practices in Islam next ♥ please keep tuned to find out more about Islam ♥

I hope this message reaches you all in good health, Emaan, and happiness ♥ Ameen ♥