the wood beyond the world

Hi mall au that no one wanted or needed: hot topic, Sephora, and American Eagle are all next to eachother.

Agatha (ofc), Hort, ravan, hester, and anadil work at hot topic

Sophie, Beatrix, Mona, Yara, Oliver, and Arachne work at Sephora

Tedros, Hex, chaddick, Rafal, and aric work at American eagle

Discuss?

Tagatha Ship Week - Day 1

So, I’m writing this for the tagatha ship week, which starts today, and I think this one turned out pretty lame, but stay tuned maybe I’ll write something good at some point.

This prompt is Beginning, and I actually wrote it like twenty minutes ago? Forgive me.

I’m looking forward to day 5 though. Wait for it people.

(I have also posted this at fanfiction.net, and I plan to post it at Ao3 very soon if you want to check it out)

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It’s dark.

It doesn’t have a name.

But it feels scared.

Suddenly there’s lighting.

And pain, so much pain.

Almost like it’s soul has been teared apart into two.

The end.

As it leaves earth, it’s broken soul wishes to be reborn.

And that’s how it starts.

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The first time Tedros is an emperor.

(To the surprise of absolutely no one.)

Agatha is a maid.

He’s not the best looking guy around and she’s beautiful, but he would not have it any other way. It’s slow, it’s true and it’s rare.

There’s nothing easy about it either.

Even if he could force her to be his, he works his way into her heart, because she doesn’t want her heart if she’s not willing to give it to him. She’s a queen among women and must be treated like it.

Of course, he ends up marring an honorable girl, who he can’t stand and he’s away at war the day she dies of mysterious causes.

(Rumor has it she was carrying the emperor’s bastard child)

The end.

Restart.

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Next time, she’s a young girl and he’s a soldier.

They meet and it’s almost as if they can feel a pull towards each other.

Tedros saves her from a raid and Agatha saves him from himself.

She keeps writing him these notes in his arms when he’s asleep, and they all tell him to come home.

He always does.

Until one day he doesn’t.

His daughter never meets him, but he can tell, in his last moments, that she’s going to have her mother’s eyes.

(Spoiler alert: She does, but her twin, his son, has his)

The end.

Restart.

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This time is a bit different.

His dad can’t stand her dad and vice-versa, so their love is forbidden.

Is between good night kisses and love letters that it grows, like a very pretty plant, until it chokes both of them in a tragedy morning, when Agatha’s best friend rats them out and their heads are hanged in the public plaza.

The end.

Restart.

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They’re siblings.

It’s a scandal and it’s wrong, but they can’t help it, because it feels way too right.

They’re going to burn in hell.

Well, so be it.

(This time they actually get away with it)

Agatha’s husband doesn’t care and Tedros’ wife doesn’t love him, it’s perfect and they take this dirty little secret to the tomb.

It’s their best kept secret and their biggest regret because when they restart, they’re miles apart.

The end.

Restart.

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Somehow, someway, Lady Agatha receives a letter.

Which is weird because no one ever sends her letters.

She knows they are all from that man, Lord Tedros. But Lord Tedros is married and their love is quiet and never completed. They never speak to each other all though their lives, but one would be foolish to question if their love was true.

It starts as compliments on her beauty and cleverness, but turns into something more as the years go by. They never kiss, never dance, never talk, but as they sit on opposite ends of the table, one could only imagine what their eyes tell each other in a few seconds.

(Hint: Is more than most people confess to their lover in a lifetime)

They both die at similar times, both sick because of the poison-like substance present in the ink.

The end.

Restart.

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Agatha is a native and Tedros is an explorer.

They’re very happy together until his men burn down part of her land, and then she kills him herself, before letting the fire consume her being.

The end.

Restart.

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She’s a hooker, goes by the name of Shadow when the sun goes down.

He’s just Tedros, you know, Tedros, son the wealthy Arthur Pendragon.

They somehow fall in love in between games, and sex, and drinks. They run away, becoming thieves and life’s good for the next ten years.

They’re old and tired.

Death awaits then, but they don’t let go of each other hands until the end.

“Agatha” she whispers, “My name is Agatha. At least someone knows it”

The axe comes down and it’s over.

The end.

Restart.

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The next time Agatha is a princess.

Waiting.

Waiting.

Waiting.

Her prince never comes, so she saves herself.

Outside the tower, there’s a handsome pauper named Tedros and they live happily ever after.

Then they die of plague.

The end.

Restart.

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The end.

Restart.

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The end.

Restart.

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The end.

Restart.

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The end.

Restart.

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The end.

Restart.

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Kissing Tedros was interesting.

Not only for obvious reasons.

Every time Agatha’s lips were on his it was like she has done it a million times before, almost like hearing every clock on the world start ticking backwards.

Maybe they were old souls.

- What are you thinking about, my queen?

Blue eyes shined bright on the light, reflecting her own brown ones.

- Have you ever wondered about past lives?

- Sometimes.

There’s a comfortable silence between then, as they shared the first rays of sunshine sitting on a balcony, trying to get away from any royal duties.

- What do you think we were to each other on our past lives? – The king asks her, playing with her hair.

- From the way I mentally wished you stabbed yourself with your own sword the moment I first saw you because I thought you were only an overconfident jerk? I think we might have been lovers.

Tedros laughs and pulls her tight towards himself.

- Sometimes I wonder if you married me just because I’m hot.

- Absolutely. – She rolls her eyes, but then she opens a smile, and Tedros’ world lights up in a completely different level – Come on, we’re gonna miss breakfast.

- Can’t help it, I love the view. – He whispers in her ear.

- Camelot is indeed a pretty sight.

- I wasn’t talking about Camelot.

Agatha’s cheeks go red and she lightly smacks his arm.

- Come on, you’re sixteen, aren’t boys hungry all the time?

Tedros’ laughter fills the morning as he follows his queen around the castle back to the table, where breakfast is being served.

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(There’s no end yet, because you see, this is only the beginning)

lotr fancast → Fan Bingbing | Luthien Tinúviel

Yet at the last Beren was slain by the Wolf that came from the gates of Angband, and he died in the arms of Tinúviel. But she chose mortality, and to die from the world, so that she might follow him; and it is sung that they met again beyond the Sundering Seas, and after a brief time walking alive once more in the green woods, together they passed, long ago, beyond the confines of this world. So it is that Lúthien Tinúviel alone of the Elf-kindred has died indeed and left the world, and they have lost her whom they most loved.

The Peeta Show

Prompt: Expressions in Everlark, Iconic Movie Posters

A/N: This is the start of a potential multi-chapter fic loosely based on The Truman Show. Hope you enjoy and feel free to let me know if you’d like to read more!

Summary: It was the highest-rated, longest-running show in television history. It was also the symbol of the oppressive influence of corporate television executives like Coriolanus Snow, who would manipulate someone just for their profit and power.

So when she had the chance to infiltrate the set, to tell the star of the show that his whole life had been orchestrated for him, to help him escape – well, she just had to try.

Peeta Mellark had to know what was real, and not real.

Keep reading

And he retraced his wanderings in those deep old lanes that began from the common road and went away towards the unknown, climbing steep hills, and piercing the woods of shadows, and dipping down into valleys that seemed virgin, unexplored, secret for the foot of man. He entered such a lane not knowing where it might bring him, hoping he had found the way to fairyland, to the woods beyond the world, to that vague territory that haunts all the dreams of a boy.
—  A. MACHEN, The Hill of Dreams.

Here’s the recording! Enjoy. This is the blurb on the CD flaps:

In Lord of the Rings Aragorn, on the hill of Weathertop, sang to his companions a song concerning the meeting of Beren son of Barahir and Luthien Tinuviel: and when he had ended he spoke to them about the story, saying: ‘Beren was a mortal man, but Luthien was the daughter of Thingol, a King of Elves upon Middle-earth when the world was young; and she was the fairest maiden that has ever been among all the children of this world. In those days the Great Enemy, of whom Sauron of Mordor was but a servant, dwelt in Angband in the North, and the Elves of the West coming back to Middle-earth made war upon him to regain the Silmarils which he had stolen; and the fathers of Men aided the Eves. But the Enemy was victorious and Barahir was slain, and Beren escaping through great peril came over the Mountains of Terror into the hidden Kingdom of Thingol in the forest of Neldoreth. There he beheld Luthien singing and dancing in a glade beside the enchanted river Esgalduin; and he named her Tinuviel, that is Nightingale in the language of old. Many sorrows befell them afterwards,and they were parted long. Tinuviel rescued Beren from the dungeons of Sauron, and together they passed through great dangers, and cast down even the Great Enemy from his throne, and took from his iron crown one of the three Silmarils, brightest of all jewels, to be the bride-price of Luthien to Thingol her father. Yet at the last Beren was slain by the Wolf that came from the gates of Angband, and he died in the arms of Tinuviel. But she chose mortality, and to die from the world, so that she might follow him; and it is sung that they met again beyond the Sundering Seas, and after a brief time walking alive once more in the green woods, together they passed, long ago, beyond the confines of this world.’

This is the story that is read on this disc. The legend of Beren and Luthien was among the very first of J. R. R. Tolken’s stories; together with the tales of Turin Turambar and the Fall of Gondolin it goes back to the days of the first World War, and the notebook in which he wrote out that earliest version (afterwards greatly changed) is still in existence.

During the 1920s he cast it into a long poem in rhyming couplets, called The Lay of Leithian or 'Release from Bondage’: this was never published, but from it he made in turn a new prose version of the legend, and it is that version that forms chapter 19 of The Silmarillion. In it there are many echoes of The Lay of Leithian, and two short passages from the poem are retained in it.

For me it is the first of all stories, for among my earliest memories is that of my father describing to me the dungeons of the Necromancer on the island of Tol Sirion, and the eyes of the werewolf that 'kindled in the dark’. For him this legend was, of all  that he made, the one nearest to his heart. He recalled to me in 1972, the year before he died and when my mother was recently dead, that he first conceived it when they walked together in a small woodland glade filled with hemlock at Roos in Yorkshire in 1917. Those hemlocks (not coniferous trees, but plants with feathery leaves and many small white flowers massed together in umbels) appear in the song that Aragorn sang on Weathertop.

In time the story became a chief part of the developed Silmarillion; and though it can be received as it stands, with only the most general knowledge of the background, it is also an essential link in the earlier history of Middle-earth. For the capture of the Silmaril, in itself a supreme victory, led to the destruction of the ancient kingdom of Doriath where Thingol riled, and bitter war among the Elves; and that same jewel was afterwards borne by Earendil who, in Aragorn’s words, 'sailed his ship out of the mists of the world into the seas of heaven with the Silmaril on his brow’. Moreover, the marriage of Beren the mortal man and Luthien the immortal Elf, who surrendered her immortality, was an event of central significance in the large conception of Middle-earth, repeated once in the First Age and for the third and last time in the marriage of Aragorn and Arwen (themselves descendants of Beren and Luthien): for from this union of the Two Kindreds an Elvish strain was inherited by Men.

On this disc I have read the greater part of chapter 19 of The Silmarillion, beginning on page 165 of the hardback (after a short resume of the narrative to that point) and ending with the first paragraph of chapter 20, with a few omissions necessary to reduce its length. These omissions are o pages 168-9, 173-4 and 176-7, and here I have introduced short bridging passages, each of which begins with the words 'The story tells..’

- Christopher Tolkien

Made with SoundCloud

According to the folk traditions of East Asia, any fox you see may be a magical creature of great power and intelligence.  Usually called “Fox Spirits” or “Fox Demons” in English sources, these beings have different names and attributes in the folklore of different countries, but the same core qualities.

Like any foxes in any stories anywhere, they are cunning tricksters.  They are also shapeshifters, usually appearing as either unassuming animals or beautiful women.  They also have powers over the material world and human senses.  Their powers grow with age, as do the number of their tails.  They meddle in the lives of mortals for purposes of good, evil, and mere amusement.

The Huli Jing of China is the oldest version of the myth.  It plays on paranoia by suggesting that anyone could be living a double life as a magical fox, and that this same person-thing could curse you with impotence or rearrange your furniture when you’re not looking.  Instead of simply taking human form, Huli Jing often possess people like ghosts.

The Japanese variant, the Kitsune, is most famous in the West.  In Shinto, it is associated with the deity Inari.  Unlike the Huli Jing, the Kitsune is usually divorced from human society, living in the woods or mysterious worlds beyond.  They take human form, but usually for a brief deception rather than a lifelong masquerade.  Still, there are stories of Kitsune adopting human personae to seduce powerful men and lead them to ruin, which is also a feature of Huli Jing tales.

Compared to its famous relatives, there is little information available on the Korean Kumiho.  They are reputedly less manipulative and more overtly evil.  While Huli Jing and Kitsune are said to be behind many deaths, Kumiho actively kill people with their sharp teeth and claws.  They leave behind the entire body except for the one organ they eat (usually the liver, but sometimes the heart).  In contrast, there are tales of sympathetic Kumiho performing feats to become human.

Illustration by Kuniyoshi Utagawa.

8

“If you had wings to lift you and the Second Star your guide, you’d find a place where all the seasons flourish side by side. Yet past the Summer Meadow and beyond the Autumn Wood, lies an icy land of secrets, a world misunderstood. But if your mind is open and your heart just has to know, your wings can take you farther than you ever thought you’d go.”