the voice of the sea speaks to the soul

The voice of the sea is seductive; never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation. The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, close embrace.
—  Kate Chopin, The Awakening
  • what she says: I'm fine
  • what she means: in Disney's The Little Mermaid (1989, dir. Ron Clements & John Musker), Ursula the Sea-Witch (voiced by Pat Carroll) makes a reference to "raking [mer-folk] 'cross the coals" as retribution for not being able to pay her for her magic during her song Poor Unfortunate Souls (written by Howard Ashman & Alan Menken). How does Ursula know what coals are? Where could she have picked up that expression without speaking to a human? The only non-aquatic animal we see mer-people directly speak to is Scuttle, whose grasp of English-speaking human terminology is highly questionable. Moreover, would Ursula ever willingly interact with Scuttle? She displayed no familiarity toward him whatsoever during the wedding confrontation at the end of the film, and yet he immediately recognized her reflection in Ariel's mirror and referred to her as the Sea-Witch. How does Scuttle know that Vanessa, Ursula's human alter-ego, is actually Ursula? His understanding of human technology means he has no way of knowing mirrors don't show the viewer other people's reflections. Consider also the readily available human disguise Ursula had, complete with a pseudonym. Has she made journeys to the surface world as a human before? Is this how she is able to speak authoritatively about what human men like during her song? Who did she interact with in the surface world? Why not go there permanently when banished by King Triton? Nothing apparently stops her magic short of her own self-imposed contractual stipulations or Triton's own magic, which is presented as almost exclusively destructive in nature. On that note,

The voice of the sea is seductive; never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation.

The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, close embrace.

Never Ceasing

“The voice of the sea is seductive; never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation. The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. ”
― Kate Chopin, The Awakening

The voice of the sea is seductive; never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander for a spell in abysses of solitude; to lose itself in mazes of inward contemplation. The voice of the sea speaks to the soul. The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft, close embrace
—  Kate Chopin, The Awakening
The voice of the sea speaks to the soul.
The touch of the sea is sensuous, enfolding the body in its soft,
close embrace.
—  Kate Chopin, The Awakening

The sea gives out a secret voice —
voice that enters
our heart, and moves it,
and delights it.

The sea intones for us a tender song,
a song composed by three great poets,
the sun, the air, and the sky.
She intones it with that divine voice of hers,
when summer weather spreads calm
like a gown over her shoulders .

Her melody wafts dewy messages
to souls . She recalls the youthful past
without rancor and without pining.
The loves of the past speak i n secret,
forgotten sentiments again come to life
within the sweet breathing of the waves.

The sea intones for us a tender song,
a song composed by three great poets,
the sun, the air, and the sky.
And as you look at her watery meadow,
as you see her infinite greenness,
her field that is so near and yet so far,

covered with yellow flowers that the light sows
like a gardener, joy takes h old of you,
and it intoxicates you, lifts up your heart.
And if you are young, the longing for the sea
will run through your veins; out of its love
the wave will say a word to you; it will water
your love with a secret fragrance.

— C.P. Cavafy, from “Voice from the Sea,” The Complete Poems, transl. by Rae Dalven (Mariner Books, 1976)