the urban scientist

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Chaos Mages

These kind of sorcerers are the last followers of a postmodern system of magick that emerged during the late 20th century in England. They are able to alter probabilities and change slightly the physical laws to shape realitiy to their will. They are usually urban erudites, philosophers, scientists or anthropologists that love the motion and confusion of large metropolis.

lewisandquark  asked:

Someone recently asked me if there were other grad students/scientists blogging pictures from their daily life in the lab. I realized that I only know of a couple scientist bloggers who focus on original content, generated by their own experiences in the lab/field. Do you know of any others, or even of a list somewhere?

Huh. You know, I don’t actually know of that many bloggers off the top of my head that blog about their own science and their own daily life in the lab and field. I mean, I know plenty of them exist, and I’ve come across their work from time to time (on Tumblr and beyond), but few of them have really stuck with me.

I think many (but not all) of us who start writing while we are doing science have a tendency to write about things that may be in our field, but are not what we work on, because we spend enough damn time thinking about our work as it is! That might be my personal bias from grad school coming through, though.

But I also think that scientists writing about their own work, whether they are tenured profs or first-year grad students, is enormously important, both for communicating science in general and communicating the science that you are doing. Because if you don’t talk about it, maybe no one will? Or worse, they may talk about your science in a way you don’t like.

Maybe we can crowdsource a list of grad students and young scientists who blog their own work? Leave yours in a reblog, reply, or comment!

Here’s just a few I know of to get the ball rolling:

There’s hundreds… likely thousands more out there. What are your favorites? 

South Side Girls: Growing Up in the Great Migration by Marcia Chatelain

In South Side Girls Marcia Chatelain recasts Chicago’s Great Migration through the lens of black girls. Focusing on the years between 1910 and 1940, when Chicago’s black population quintupled, Chatelain describes how Chicago’s black social scientists, urban reformers, journalists and activists formulated a vulnerable image of urban black girlhood that needed protecting. She argues that the construction and meaning of black girlhood shifted in response to major economic, social, and cultural changes and crises, and that it reflected parents’ and community leaders’ anxieties about urbanization and its meaning for racial progress. Girls shouldered much of the burden of black aspiration, as adults often scrutinized their choices and behavior, and their well-being symbolized the community’s moral health.  [book link]

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Not sure if you guys would be interested in the non-entomological details of my personal life but I love to sing and I tried out for the previous season of American Idol

This week last year, I was waiting to see myself on one of the most highly viewed shows on national TV (or at least it was in it’s glory days anyway). I wish I could say I was excited but it was sort of an ordeal =\  The way the whole audition had played out had me feeling more than a bit insecure.  Everyone saw Harry Connick Jr hassle me over my word choice but AI didn’t air feedback from the other judges. Jennifer Lopez and Keith Urbane told me that I had a “great voice” but with a gesture to all of me at once, J-Lo followed that up by explaining to me that I just didn’t “look” like an American Idol. It sent me home looking for something to change. It took me a while, but I think I finally figured out what.

Learn to teach Earth and space science in New York City through the Master of Arts in Teaching Urban Residency Program at the American Museum of Natural History; the first urban teacher residency program offered by a museum.

  • Full-time 15 month program with stipend
  • Small class sizes and one-on-one mentoring
  • Science coursework at a world-class museum
  • Learn to teach in a supportive nurturing environment
  • Work alongside scientists and urban teachers
  • Graduate with real-world teaching experience
  • Ongoing professional support following graduation

Share your passion for science and learning. Learn more on our website, or during a webinar on Wednesday, January 14.

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Jill Trent, Science Sleuth, debuted in 1943 and lasted a little over a year. She was a gun-toting urban super-scientist/private detective who solved crimes. Her constant (and only) companion was Daisy, her tough brunette partner, who lived with her and called her ‘honey.’

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Are you ready to change lives? Learn to be a science teacher through the Museum’s Master of Arts in Teaching program. Features include:

  • Full-time 15-month program with stipend
  • Small class sizes and one-on-one mentoring
  • Science coursework at a world-class museum
  • Learn to teach in a supportive nurturing environment
  • Work alongside scientists and urban teachers
  • Graduate with real-world teaching experience
  • Ongoing professional support following graduation

Want to learn more about the program? Join us for an open house this Sunday, January 10, or for a webinar on Tuesday, January 26.