the two best characters

It breaks my heart when you have two female characters who are best friends and would be perfect for the friends to lovers trope but the writers won’t even consider making them canon because apparently it’s “unrealistic” but it’s more unrealistic to pretend that a woman can’t fall in love with their female friend. It is something that happens to us wlw in real life and it is important that the media normalises this to show young wlw that it is okay to fall for your female friend. What’s even worse is if it was a m/f friendship the writers would definitely consider making it a thing. We need more f/f friends to lovers relationships.

im not saying nina taught sonny to read, but that is what she tells people

  • Taserface: "You've gone soft old man!"
  • Yondu: "I AIN'T GONE NOTHIN'!"
  • *Yondu kills everyone that betrayed him, rescues Rocket and Groot, helps the Guardians kill a celestial being, and sacrifices himself to save Quill.*

The real reason why both companies shouldn’t be in the same timeline

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“[…] I hope I can be half the person he is. And if I have to choose between caring for my friend and believing in your God…then I choose…m-my friend!” Kitty Pryde (x)

watching Jughead and Betty have an honest and mature relationship, solving both personal and relationship problems together, and being one of the healthiest ships on tv. 

Don’t Worry About ‘Strong Female Characters.’

In a world where a woman showing her chest is somehow pro-feminist and anti-feminist at the same time, it’s easy to see why any writer would stress over their female characters.

Relax.

Chances are, if you know anything about writing, your fictitious females are fine, even if they are fine. But if you’re still worried, I have two good examples from Disney coming up. (Hint: They’re sisters.)

But first…

The term ‘Strong Female Character’ is ludicrous and makes writing worse.

There’s more scrutiny and expectation placed on female characters than male characters, and at a risk of writing a twenty-paragraph essay about who is to blame for that, let’s just say I think the term ‘strong female character’ is part of the problem. It isn’t just a case of high expectations that are impossible to meet, but also about the stress it puts on the author that halts the creative process.

So again, relax.

Stress aside, it can also lead to this:

“I want to write a strong female character. Someone inspiring. Someone every little girl can look up to. Someone…”

No. Stop right there, Idealist. This is why there are so many more Mary Sues than Gary Stus.

You didn’t even know Gary Stu was a thing, did you?

Let go of the idea of representation. You don’t represent anyone. Your character doesn’t represent anyone. You are you, and they are them. Write people.

What does ‘strong’ even mean?

Mentally strong? Physically strong? It can mean just about anything.

The vagueness of the term hasn’t helped.

A lot of people have taken it to mean – and stop me if you’ve heard this before – a fiery, no-nonsense woman, who don’t need no man.

That was good for the first, what, twelve times? Heck, I take that back. It’s still a good archetype, when done correctly. Sarah Connor and Ellen Ripley are beloved examples of this. Iconic, even. Since then, it’s been turned into a formula by people who don’t understand why those characters are liked to begin with, and repeated to the point of yawn-inducing parody.

A character who makes you yawn is not a strong character.

Remember: In writing terms, strong = well-written.

So what makes a well written character?

Let’s look at that example now.

Disney… Sisters… Eldest sings a famous song…

I’m sure you already know. It is of course…

Lilo and Nani.

…What? Who else did you think it was going to be?

Lilo and Nani are, hands-down, two of the best characters Disney has ever put out. They have interests, hobbies, and jobs. They love each other, make each other laugh, but also get on each other’s nerves. They have good qualities and they have bad qualities - and not bad as in Elsa’s 'oh, I’m so insecure’ or Mulan’s 'gosh, I’m so clumsy.’ They are flawed. Nani is short-tempered and irresponsible. Lilo is stubborn and violent. Yet, they’re still likeable because their situation makes it clear why they are the way they are. We can relate to them.

In short: They feel like real people.

And possibly the most important thing for any character: They drive the plot forward.

“Wait, Ashlee!” those of you who have seen the movie cry out, “What about Stitch? He’s the main character. He’s the one who drives the plot forward, surely.”

Stitch is the catalyst. The point of attack. The first plot point. The inciting incident. etc. At the start, its Stitch’s escape from the prison ship and crash landing on Hawaii that causes the plot. After that, it’s largely Lilo and Nani who control the story and the tension.

Speaking of tension…

Good characters have stakes. Raw bloody stakes!

Lilo and Nani have the most to lose. If Nani doesn’t get a job and Lilo doesn’t train the born-to-be-wild Stitch, they lose their home and each other.

To sum it up…

Character Checklist:

  • Vulnerable
  • Flawed 
  • Relatable 
  • High stakes and the ability to overcome them

Thank you for reading. Comments, criticisms, and trolls are welcome.

Best bros on vacay

The final episode of Naruto was the most forced, unrealistic, and shitty episode of this anime I’ve ever seen.
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a plague doctor: what’s up with that?
answer: we just don’t know.

tnikiforovsworld  asked:

Why have I never shipped deathshipping as hard as I am till now?

camillavirgil replied to your photoset

Book Faramir IS the best Faramir

The change to Faramir’s character in The Two Towers was by far my biggest disappointment with the movies. I discussed it with other fans back in the day, watched and rewatched the BTS features and listened to the commentary tracks, and ended up mostly defending the filmmakers’ decision in online debates. But it was always a little (or more than a little) sad for me that they did that.

I know the arguments on both sides. I know why they felt they had to do it. No one is giving me hundreds of millions of dollars to adapt a sprawling, multi-book epic to the big screen in a way that will justify its enormous budget and satisfy everyone from lifelong lovers of the source material (*waves*) to new fans and casual “eh, sure; I’ll watch it” types.

But I’ll always regret that they couldn’t find room for the actual character from the books, the one who wasn’t going to undercut Aragorn or his struggle just by existing, but also wasn’t going to beat up Gollum or send the Ring to Denethor, because those things were wrong, and he saw himself as bound by that.

There’s a clip of David Wenham describing how he went to Jackson/Boyens/Walsh (or maybe it was just a story recounted by one of the latter trio; I can’t remember now) after he’d read the books (which he hadn’t when he was cast), and saying hey, you know, this actually seems like a significant change to my character. And them telling him yeah, we know, but we need to for all these reasons (*enumerates reasons*) and anyway he ends up in the same place, right?

Yeah, no. I mean yeah, he ends up having made the same decision. But he’s not the same person. How he gets there matters.

I want to believe a movie could have been made that didn’t sacrifice his character in the name of storytelling. It wouldn’t have been the same movie; might not have been as successful a movie. But I would have loved it.

I’ve mentioned that I’m reading the books again, out loud with my co-conspirator at night, the way we used to do. We just finished the Council of Elrond, and it was a thrill to realize that the brother Boromir referred to (though not by name) was the real Faramir, my Faramir.

I can’t wait to meet him again.

Hey guys check out how Nino’s VA in Miraculous Ladybug is credited

Ye, he provides voices in a bunch of places. but you know who else


Edit: Bro actually shout out to Ben Diskin 

For voicing some of the most vocally different sounding characters, had no idea he was Max and Nooroo as well