the tollbooth

  1. “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
  2. “Pride and Prejudice” by Jane Austen
  3. “The Diary of Anne Frank” by Anne Frank
  4. “1984” by George Orwell
  5. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone" by J.K. Rowling
  6. “The Lord of the Rings” (1-3) by J.R.R. Tolkien
  7. “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  8. “Charlotte’s Web” by E.B. White
  9. “The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien
  10. “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott
  11. “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury
  12. “Jane Eyre” by Charlotte Bronte
  13. “Animal Farm” by George Orwell
  14. “Gone with the Wind” by Margaret Mitchell
  15. “The Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger
  16. “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak
  17. “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain
  18. “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins
  19. “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett
  20. “The Lion, the Witch, and the Wadrobe” by C.S. Lewis
  21. The Grapes of Wrath” by John Steinbeck
  22. “The Lord of the Flies” by William Golding
  23. “The Kite Runner” by Khaled Hosseini
  24. “Night” by Elie Wiesel
  25. “Hamlet” by William Shakespeare
  26. “A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L'Engle
  27. “Of Mice and Men” by John Steinbeck
  28. “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens
  29. “Romeo and Juliet” by William Shakespeare
  30. “The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy” by Douglas Adams
  31. “The Secret Garden” by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  32. “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens
  33. “The Little Prince” by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
  34. “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley
  35. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” by J.K. Rowling
  36. “The Giver” by Lois Lowry
  37. “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood
  38. “Where the Sidewalk Ends” by Shel Silverstein
  39. “Wuthering Heights” Emily Bronte
  40. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green
  41. “Anne of Green Gables” by L.M. Montgomery
  42. “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain
  43. “Macbeth” by William Shakespeare
  44. “The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larrson  
  45. “Frankenstein” by Mary Shelley
  46. “The Holy Bible: King James Version”
  47. “The Color Purple” by Alice Walker
  48. “The Count of Monte Cristo” by Alexandre Dumas
  49. “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith
  50. “East of Eden” by John Steinbeck
  51. “Alice in Wonderland” by Lewis Carroll
  52. “In Cold Blood” by Truman Capote
  53. “Catch-22” by Joseph Heller
  54. “The Stand” by Stephen King
  55. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon
  56. “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” by J.K. Rowling
  57. “Enders Game” by Orson Scott Card
  58. “Anna Karenina” by Leo Tolstoy
  59. “Watership Down” by Richard Adams
  60. “Memoirs of a Geisha” by Arthur Golden
  61. “Rebecca” by Daphne du Maurier
  62. “A Game of Thrones” by George R.R. Martin
  63. “Great Expectations” by Charles Dickens
  64. “The Old Man and the Sea” by Ernest Hemingway
  65. “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes” (#3) by Arthur Conan Doyle
  66. “Les Misérables” by Victor Hugo
  67. “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” by J.K. Rowling
  68. “Life of Pi” by Yann Martel
  69. “The Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  70. “Celebrating Silence: Excerpts from Five Years of Weekly Knowledge” by Sri Sri Ravi Shankar
  71. “The Chronicles of Narnia” by C.S. Lewis
  72. “The Pillars of the Earth” by Ken Follett
  73. “Catching Fire” by Suzanne Collins
  74. “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” by Roald Dahl
  75. “Dracula” by Bram Stoker
  76. “The Princess Bride” by William Goldman
  77. “Water for Elephants” by Sara Gruen
  78. “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe
  79. “The Secret Life of Bees” by Sue Monk Kidd
  80. “The Poisonwood Bible: A Novel” by Barbara Kingsolver
  81. “One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez
  82. “The Time Traveler’s Wife” by Audrey Niffenegger
  83. “The Odyssey” by Homer
  84. “The Good Earth (House of Earth #1)” by Pearl S. Buck
  85. “Mockingjay (Hunger Games #3)” by Suzanne Collins
  86. “And Then There Were None” by Agatha Christie
  87. “The Thorn Birds” by Colleen McCullough
  88. “A Prayer for Owen Meany” by John Irving
  89. “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls
  90. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot
  91. “Crime and Punishment” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  92. “The Road” by Cormac McCarthy
  93. “The Things They Carried” by Tim O'Brien
  94. “Siddhartha” by Hermann Hesse
  95. “Beloved” by Toni Morrison
  96. “Slaughterhouse-Five” by Kurt Vonnegut
  97. “Cutting For Stone” by Abraham Verghese
  98. “The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster
  99. “The Brothers Karamazov” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  100. “The Story of My Life” by Helen Keller

Hi guys! Here’s a little masterpost of quotes from children’s books that you can use in your bullet journal, or anywhere else you feel like!

THE LITTLE PRINCE (ANTOINE DE SAINT-EXUPÉRY)

  • “It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.”
  • “The most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or touched, they are felt with the heart.”
  • “You become responsible forever for what you’ve tamed.” 
  • “You - you alone will have the stars as no one else has them…In one of the stars I shall be living. In one of them I shall be laughing. And so it will be as if all the stars were laughing, when you look at the sky at night…You - only you - will have stars that can laugh.”
  • “Grown-ups never understand anything by themselves, and it is tiresome for children to be always and forever explaining things to them”
  • “A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.” 

A LITTLE PRINCESS (FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT)

  • “If I am a princess in rags and tatters, I can be a princess inside. It would be easy to be a princess if I were dressed in cloth of gold, but it is a great deal more of a triumph to be one all the time when no one knows it.”
  • “When you will not fly into a passion people know you are stronger than they are, because you are strong enough to hold in your rage, and they are not, and they say stupid things they wish they hadn’t said afterward. “
  • “There’s nothing so strong as rage, except what makes you hold it in–that’s stronger. It’s a good thing not to answer your enemies.”
  • “If nature has made you for a giver, your hands are born open, and so is your heart; and though there may be times when your hands are empty, your heart is always full, and you can give things out of that–warm things, kind things, sweet things–help and comfort and laughter–and sometimes gay, kind laughter is the best help of all.”
  • “Somehow, something always happens just before things get to the very worst. It is as if Magic did it. If I could only just remember that always. The worse thing never quite comes.”
  • “But I suppose there might be good in things, even if we don’t see it.”
  • “You don’t forget, but you bear it better.” 

LITTLE WOMEN (LOUISA MAY ALCOTT)

  • “I am not afraid of storms, for I am learning how to sail my ship.”
  • “It’s wicked to throw away so many good gifts because you can’t have the one you want.”
  • “Love is a great beautifier.” 
  • “Watch and pray, dear, never get tired of trying, and never think it is impossible to conquer your fault.”
  • “I want to do something splendid…something heroic or wonderful that won’t be forgotten after I’m dead. I don’t know what, but I’m on the watch for it and mean to astonish you all someday.” 
  • “Conceit spoils the finest genius.” 
  • “Be comforted, dear soul! There is always light behind the clouds.”
  • “Life and love are very precious when both are in full bloom.”
  • “The only chivalry worth having is that which is the readiest to to pay deference to the old, protect the feeble, and serve womankind, regardless of rank, age, or color.”
  • “Books are always good company if you have the right sort.”
  • “The humblest tasks get beautified if loving hands do them.”
  • “Now and then, in this workaday world, things do happen in the delightful storybook fashion, and what a comfort that is.”

MATLIDA (ROALD DAHL)

  • “So Matilda’s strong young mind continued to grow, nurtured by the voices of all those authors who had sent their books out into the world like ships on the sea. These books gave Matilda a hopeful and comforting message: You are not alone.” 
  • “Never do anything by halves if you want to get away with it. Be outrageous. Go the whole hog. Make sure everything you do is so completely crazy it’s unbelievable…” 
  • “I have found it impossible to talk to anyone about my problems. I couldn’t face the embarrassment, and anyway I lack the courage. Any courage I had was knocked out of me when I was young. But now, all of sudden I have a sort of desperate wish to tell everything to somebody.”
  • “I’ve always said to myself that if a little pocket calculator can do it why shouldn’t I?”
  • “There is little point in teaching anything backwards. The whole object of life, Headmistress, is to go forwards.”
  • “I’m afraid men are not always quite as clever as they think they are.”

THE PHANTOM TOLLBOOTH (NORTON JUSTER)

  • “So many things are possible just as long as you don’t know they’re impossible.”
  • “Have you ever heard the wonderful silence just before the dawn? Or the quiet and calm just as a storm ends? Or perhaps you know the silence when you haven’t the answer to a question you’ve been asked, or the hush of a country road at night, or the expectant pause of a room full of people when someone is just about to speak, or, most beautiful of all, the moment after the door closes and you’re alone in the whole house? Each one is different, you know, and all very beautiful if you listen carefully.”
  • “Time is a gift, given to you, given to give you the time you need, the time you need to have the time of your life. ”
  • “You must never feel badly about making mistakes … as long as you take the trouble to learn from them. For you often learn more by being wrong for the right reasons than you do by being right for the wrong reasons.”
  • “The most important reason for going from one place to another is to see what’s in between.”
  • “What you can do is often simply a matter of what you will do.”
  • “What you learn today, for no reason at all, will help you discover all the wonderful secrets of tomorrow.”
  • “Whatever we learn has a purpose and whatever we do affects everything and everyone else, if even in the tiniest way.”

THE GOLDEN COMPASS (PHILIP PULLMAN)

  • “You cannot change what you are, only what you do.”
  • “We are all subject to the fates. But we must act as if we are not, or die of despair.”
  • “Every opportunity will come again.”

honestly, one of the reasons why i adore the raven cycle is because of how realistically poverty and class is written.  because the part with blue in her guidance counselor’s office, hoping desperately for the chance to get into this college she wants so badly and realizing that it’s unattainable, that she has to keep compromising, that she won’t ever just be able to get what she wants, is so fucking true and heartbreaking.  Adam’s jealousy over the other raven boy’s ability to slack off, to not work as hard as him, to be able to just pay a tollbooth fare without thinking about it.  his clinging to his dignity because it’s one of the only things he has, and how much it hurts to be around people who you know will get farther than you in life working half as hard as you.  that’s real. that’s why blue and adam are so compelling as characters.  because being poor sucks and I’ve never seen anyone portray that as well and as clearly as maggie stiefvater

Book Rec List

I’m bored, home alone, and packing all my books. So here, have a list of book recommendations from yours truly!

Fantasy

  • Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit
    • A young girl meets a family that gained eternal life after drinking from an enchanted spring, and is left to wonder whether living forever is a blessing or a curse. It’s a fantastic book that hurts your heart in 139 pages.
  • Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
    • Six morally horrible people plan an impossible heist for selfish motivations. But the romances between the morally horrible people are somehow still very pure and wonderful. The plot also keeps you on the edge of your seat because you never have all of the information until the last possible second. And if you love fantasy worlds that include POC main characters and LGBTQ representation, this is the duology for you!
  • The Last Dragonlord by Joanne Bertin
    • Human/dragon shapeshifter romance with political intrigue. And really fun worldbuilding, too.
  • Green Rider by Kristen Britain
    • One of my favorite series. The overarching plot is wonderful, you genuinely care about all the characters, and this is one of those stories where “strong female characters” means both “well-rounded, well-developed females with agency” AND “kicks some serious ass”.
  • Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
    • The protagonist is the villain. I wrote that correctly. Artemis Fowl is the villain. The entire series is about his personal journey from villain to hero, with all the beautiful and human mistakes throughout.
    • Also, it’s got fairies. With guns.
  • Dragon’s Milk by Susan Fletcher
    • A super fun (and quick-read) series about people smuggling dragons to safety in a world that is determined to destroy them. Also, lots of baby dragons. And dragons being dragons, and neither morally good nor evil. It’s wonderful.
  • Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
    • The funniest fucking book I’ve ever read. God’s starting the apocalypse, but they’ve somehow managed to misplace the AntiChrist. And it just gets more insane.
  • Seraphina by Rachel Hartman
    • One of my favorite books of all time. It has a fascinating new take on dragons, genuinely fun political intrigue, romances you root for but aren’t the focus of the plot, and a half-dragon heroine that you absolutely fall in love with. And, if you make it to the second book, Shadow Scales, there is massive LGBTQ representation. I’m talking gay and bi characters, I’m talking trans characters, I’m talking people asking “How may I pronoun you?” and strongly-implied polyamorous relationships. And dragons. And plot twists.
  • Castaways of the Flying Dutchman by Brian Jacques
    • When the Flying Dutchman was cursed to roam the sea forever, a boy and his dog who were on board are spared from the curse due to their pure hearts, are washed ashore and granted eternal life and youth. Now they roam the world helping people and getting into adventures. Don’t let the fun fool you, though, it’s fucking heartbreaking. They really don’t skimp on the “we’re immortal so everyone we love dies” angle, and the “wow, this kid looks like he’s seen some shit”. Also the first book feels much more YA than the other two.
  • The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster
    • I know it’s pretty much only known as middle-school assigned reading, but this book is clever, insightful, and absolutely fantastic. I definitely stood in line to get this book autographed in high school. A boy with no imagination is sent to a crazy world of unique perspectives and interesting insights to rescue Rhyme and Reason.
  • A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
    • That book they made us all read in 5th grade that is actually all it’s cracked up to be. It’s absolutely trippy fantasy with a sci-fi edge to it, and the characters are so utterly endearing. Personally, my favorite is A Wind in the Door, but that’s book 2.
  • The Onion Girl by Charles de Lint
    • Contemporary fantasy at its absolute best. It’s modern urban fantasy that puts the fantastic in our world in such a wonderful and beautiful way. The best part is it’s also a story about dealing with physical disabilities, trauma, past abuse, self-healing, the complexity of forging and rekindling relationships with others when one is hurting, etc. Honestly, it’s just fucking awesome.
  • Dreams Underfoot by Charles de Lint
    • A book of short stories (all contemporary urban fantasy), and the best way to be introduced to Charles de Lint’s writing. So, if you want to read The Onion Girl but aren’t sure you’re ready for it yet. This is the first book I ever took a highlighter to.
  • Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
    • Do you want to crush your heart and destroy your soul and cry like a baby in 128 pages? You’ll be happy you did.
  • Elantris by Brandon Sanderson
    • This is a standalone novel, and the best way to be introduced to Sanderson’s work. This book has phenomenal and complex worldbuilding, three-dimensional characters with agency you will fall in love with, and a book-long mystery that just blows you away when you figure out the answer. If you enjoy this book, you have to read Mistborn next.
  • Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson
    • Elantris on steroids. This is, without a doubt, the most fascinating worldbuilding I have ever encountered in literature. It’s so complicated, but completely logical, and the plot is so bewitching. And Sanderson can leave you as many clues as he wants - he will still blow your fucking mind when all the pieces come together at the end. The book takes a while to pick up the pace, but I swear to you it’s worth it.
  • Dealing with Dragons by Patricia Wrede
    • A princess gets bored, and decides to volunteer to be a dragon’s captive. Then she gets into a ton of adventures and ends up discovering a plot to overthrow the dragon government. It’s a lighthearted, quick and fun read, and Cimorene is my fucking hero.

Classics

  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
    • Oh God, read Pride and Prejudice. It’s my absolute favorite book.
  • Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
    • If you can, read the abridged copy. It’s kind of hard to find, so look for the one that was translated by Charles Wilbour and abridged by Paul Bénichou. It’s all the meat of the story and barely a third of the size.
  • Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux
    • I mostly like it because it’s written from the rather limiting perspective of Raoul, which means you’re in the dark about the goings-on of the book until someone bothers to tell Raoul what’s happening. It’s actually a lot of fun.
  • Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
    • A grim mystery wrapped up like a romance, where the second Mrs. de Winter is trying to discover what truly happened to her husband’s first wife. It’s by the woman who wrote The Birds (which you may know as the famous Hitchcock movie), if that clues you in to the vibe of the book.

  • I don’t really have enough classics on this list

These are the 100 best young adult books, according to Time. How many of these have you read?

  1. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie
  2. Harry Potter (series) by J.K. Rowling
  3. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
  4. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
  5. Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White
  6. Holes by Louis Sachar
  7. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  8. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton
  9. The Phantom Tollbooth by Norman Juster
  10. The Giver by Lois Lowry
  11. Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
  12. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  13. Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor
  14. Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
  15. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
  16. Monster by Walter Dean Myers
  17. The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman
  18. The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank 
  19. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg
  20. Looking for Alaska by John Green
  21. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time  by Mark Haddon
  22. Little House on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder
  23. The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamilo
  24. Wonder by R.J. Palacio
  25. The Sword in the Stone by T.H. White
  26. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
  27. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  28. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  29. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
  30. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
  31. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  32. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  33. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll
  34. Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson
  35. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
  36. A Separate Peace by John Knowles
  37. Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh
  38. The Chocolate War by Robert Cormier
  39. Jacob Have I Loved by Katherine Paterson
  40. A Series of Unfortunate Events (series) by Lemony Snicket  
  41. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
  42. The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
  43. Feed by M.T. Anderson
  44. The Alchemyst by Michael Scott
  45. The Princess Bride by William Goldman 
  46. Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary
  47. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  48. Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes
  49. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin
  50. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
  51. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
  52. Mary Poppins by P.L. Travers
  53. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  54. A Northern Light by Jennifer Donnelly
  55. The Yearling by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
  56. The Hunger Games (series) by Suzanne Collins
  57. For Freedom by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
  58. The Wall: Growing up Behind the Iron Curtain by Peter Sis
  59. A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness
  60. Percy Jackson and the Olympians (series) by Rick Riordan
  61. The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury
  62. A Wreath for Emmett Till by Marilyn Nelson
  63. Every Day by David Levithan
  64. Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley
  65. Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  66. Blankets by Craig Thompson 
  67. Private Peaceful by Michael Morpurgo
  68. The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare
  69. Dangerous Angels by Francesca Lia Block
  70. Frindle by Andrew Clements
  71. Boxers and Saints by Gene Luen Yang
  72. The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
  73. City of the Beasts by Isabel Allende
  74. American Born Chinese by  Gene Luen Yang
  75. The Lost Conspiracy by Frances Hardinge
  76. Dogsbody by Diana Wynne Jones
  77. The Pigman by Paul Zindel
  78. Alabama Moon by Watt Key
  79. Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan
  80. The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
  81. Boy Proof by Cecil Castellucci
  82. Fallen Angels by Walter Dean Myers
  83. A High Wind in Jamaica by Richard Hughes
  84. The Tiger Rising by Kate Dicamillo
  85. When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead
  86. Saffy’s Angel by Hilary McKay
  87. The Grey King by Susan Cooper
  88. Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O'Brien
  89. The Thief Lord by Cornelia Funke
  90. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Steward
  91. The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick
  92. Sabriel by Garth Nix
  93. Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson
  94. Secret (series) by Pseudonymous Bosch
  95. The Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
  96. Tales of Mystery and Imagination by Edgar Allan Poe
  97. Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher
  98. The Chronicles of Prydian (series) by Lloyd Alexander
  99. Danny, the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl
  100. Twilight by Stephenie Meyer

P.S. Want to make a little more progress on this list? You can get two free audiobooks here

Have you ever heard the wonderful silence just before the dawn? Or the quiet and calm just as a storm ends? Or perhaps you know the silence when you haven’t the answer to a question you’ve been asked, or the hush of a country road at night, or the expectant pause of a room full of people when someone is just about to speak, or, most beautiful of all, the moment after the door closes and you’re alone in the whole house? Each one is different, you know, and all very beautiful if you listen carefully.
—  Norton Juster, The Phantom Tollbooth
10

A Third Collection of Literary Maps

  • Narnia, from The Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis
  • Nautical Route of the Dawn Treader, from The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, C.S. Lewis
  • The Kingdom of Wisdom, from The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster
  • Earthsea, from the works of Ursula K. Le Guin
  • Shannara, from The Shannara Chronicles, Terry Brooks
  • Pellucidar, from the Pellucidar series, Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • Barsoom (Mars), from the Martian Tales, Edgar Rice Buroughs
  • Bas-Lag, from the works of China Miéville
  • New Crobuzon, from Perdido Street Station, China Miéville
  • (Jeru)Salem’s Lot, from the novel ’Salem’s Lot and the short stories “Jerusalem’s Lot” & “One for the Road”, Stephen King
3

Preliminary concept paintings by Phyllis Graham for the Chuck Jones-produced and directed “The Phantom Tollbooth”, 1970 (his only feature-length film). 

Phyllis Graham, the wife of renowned CalArts art teacher, Don Graham, would submit her ideas as small mixed media paintings, about the size of a long postcard. Her work for “The Phantom Tollbooth” numbers in the hundreds, each one a jewel. 

Privacy; Interrupted

Summary: Request from Anon -The boys get bored and insisted on joining you while you grocery shop. [and it turned into whatever this is, sorry.]**

Characters: Steve Rogers, Bucky Barnes

Word Count: 1300+

Warnings: Language, implied smut, terrible writing, PWP, Ash having a computer, smut,  idfk reader beware.

A/N: This is a rewrite from a SPN fic I wrote from an anon request. The bolded italics are the reader’s thoughts. I wasn’t going to tell you that but I figured I save myself the time of answering asks about it.

Originally posted by skylerlockerbie


Day 11 without a hint of action and the boys are officially driving me nuts. With the Accords in place, Bucky in recovery, and Tony Stark nowhere to be found, life was pretty dull around your safe house.

I, on the other hand, have buried myself  into my writing. Finally putting some much needed thought into my  novel, adding bit and pieces to my screenplay, and dabbling in some prose that was a little ‘less dignified’. I spend way more time thinking of synonyms of penis, than I’d like to admit.

The guys weren’t prepared for the sudden onslaught of nothingness and since I’d taken up permanent residence with them, I was now their sole form of entertainment.

Keep reading

Drive Me Crazy - battleshidge (Amiria_Raven)

Word Count: 7, 729

Summary: Keith stared blankly at the tollbooth operator for a moment before trying to stifle a groan. Somehow, he always managed to get the booth with the flirtatious attendant, a lanky brown-haired man with clear blue eyes and a confident grin. It didn’t matter that he changed what lane he went through—at least three times a week on his way home from work, Keith was forced to suffer through the horrendous flirts that this man tossed his way.