the style of storytelling

| ZEVRAN + INDESS | Dragon Age: Origins |

“You’re so much stronger than you know.”

anonymous asked:

There's been a image shared throughout the internet for years now titled "Cartoons Then Vs. Cartoons Now". It compares various faces from Hanna Barbera and Warner Bros era cartoons to "CalArts" cartoons (Steven Universe, SVTFOE, Gravity Falls, Clarence, etc), and it implies CalArts style is two circles for a head and big eyes and that all cartoons now are like that, compared to more diverse and artistically wholesome styles of the "old days".

Okay, this is the image we’re referring to:

I hadn’t seen this meme before. Very interesting! I could see the point they’re trying to make, but only on the surface. Once you deconstruct it you realize it’s silly…

Caveat: I graduated from Calarts, and I worked on two of these shows, so it’s pretty likely I have a bias toward defending the “cartoons now” stance. So there you go. But I had lunch with my peers today and we discussed this very topic, and we come from both Calarts and non-Calarts backgrounds. And we all agreed this meme was just…annoying. Here were some of our points:

First of all, I’m construing that the people who made this meme are arguing that cartoons today look too similar. Is this the same thing as the “calarts style?” If it is, then their “argument” is off to a bad start. Two of these current shows were created by people who didn’t attend Calarts. (Steven Universe and The Amazing World of Gumball) And the two that DID had the same character designer contribute to the designs for a time (Phil Rynda). 

Secondly, it’s comparing 80+ years of cartoons vs. cartoons from 2011-2015; just 4 years. Pick any 4 years since the beginning of animation as a storytelling medium and my hypothesis is that they, too, followed a somewhat recognizable trend in style and quality, right? Although I still feel like each of these shows is stylistically very unique and stands on its own. 

Thirdly, if this is what people are calling the “calarts style” then it is choosing to ignore the other 99% of animation that comes out of that school. Every year there are new innovative styles of storytelling and character animation that push the envelope–and not just from that school, from ANY animation school! So no, there is no “calarts style,” not in my book, and to me it’s kinda disrespectful or ignorant to assume that there would be. 

It would be fun to pull this apart even more, but I think I’ve put in my two cents worth… I would tell the people who complain about a “calarts style” to just go make your own cartoons if you don’t like what’s out there. 

Thanks for the fun topic! 

(P.S. that dipper is off-model)

2

With the Windenburg University Fan Pack, you can better prepare your Sims for their transition into adulthood. Immerse them in the college lifestyle and let the Campus become their classroom! Send those teens off to Get Educated!

EXPLORE THE VAST CAMPUS by @redhotchilisimblr

ID : DWould / CC Free / 64 x 64 / Library / 859K

  • Get set up in your new dorm room and meet your fellow students, maybe join a club or two! On the first floor of your dorm, you will find the common area where we keep recreational and gaming equipment that can be checked out from the hall desk, as well as a small kitchen for late night snacking.
  • Don’t forget to take note of the lecture halls inside the main building so you aren’t late on your first day. The Dean has a great view of the entire Campus from his office in the tower so make sure to be on your best behavior.
  • The library in the West wing of the main building boasts more than 3000 books to browse, 14 desktop computers, and a quiet space to spread out and do all that homework you’ve neglected!
  • The cafeteria in the East wing of the main building will keep you well fed. Keep an eye out for (hopefully) delicious experimental dishes from the Culinary Arts Kitchens upstairs.
  • Interested in the fine arts program? Take some time to explore your creativity in the Art District next door to the dorm. With it’s towering walls decorated with former student’s works of art, you’re sure to feel those creative juices flow and become inspired to create some of your own.
  • Across the Quad from your dorm is the Science District. Collect samples from the surrounding area to splice and grow in our gorgeous Greenhouse and terrace.
  • In your free time, ‘The White Lotus’ basement terrace is a gorgeous place to grab some caffiene and sweets. Later in the evening, The Green Leprechaun Bar will be your new stomping ground. Mingle with your fellow nightowls and blow off some steam! Shop at the official campus bookstore for all of your supply and swag needs.

Windenburg University Majors

  1. Science (Skills : Logic - Programming)
  2. Art (Skills : Painting - Handiness - Photography)
  3. Media / Communication (Skills : Charisma - Photography)
  4. Physical Education (Skills : Fitness - Wellness)
  5. Drama (Skills : Charisma - Comedy - Singing)
  6. Business (Skills : Logic - Charisma)
  7. Culinary (Skills : Gourmet - Baking)
  8. History (Skills : Writing - Logic)

SHOW YOUR SCHOOL SPIRIT SWAG  by @vivificus-zombiae

And also new buy mode recolors (with various swatches each) :

Includes*… :

  • 4 base game top recolors (5 swatches each)
  • 5 new hairstyles
  • Puff chair (19 swatches)
  • “Hipster” style 3-piece living room seating set : couch, loveseat, armchair (5 swatches)
  • Matching area rug (10 swatches)

(*) Base Game Compatible.

TS2 > TS4 CONVERSIONS by @zx-ta

Includes 25 objects from The Sims 2 : FreeTime and Teen Style Stuff

Also includes a walls set !

STORYTELLING POSE PACK by @haziesims

Includes 16 new poses (more not in the preview)

Note :

Every items have been successfully playtested. For MAC users, you might encounters stuttering issues if your computer is running on an old version or with minimal requirements. For newest versions or PC users, no issues have been found.

Because the University is set as a lbrary, kids can possibly show up. It doesn’t happens a lot, but it could be annoying for some users. To prevent this, chose the lot trait “teens hangout”. Also, if you’ve Get Together, create a group of students and set up the campus as their favorite location. With both combine, you’ve a slim chance to have kids showing up, and if they do, they’ll leave pretty soon.

> DOWNLOAD <

(Includes all the custom contents, the poses pack and the lot tray file)


We’re all so proud and happy to finally share our project. It was quite challenging but I think the wait finally worth it. Thanks for your support, your patience and ideas. Besides, I want to thanks all the person who’ve somehow participated on the project. No doubt I’ll do it again because it was such a great experience to share with amazing creators and you. Once again, happy simming and feel free to tag us or use the hashtag “windenburguniversity” if you’re using our creations !  -Red.

luckycollectionexpert  asked:

Hi, I am big fan of MMFR now and find your writings very interesting. I am very confused why at the final battle Max and Furiosa not used any gun to self protected at all. Max do have some round at the beginning and then looking for bullets to refill. Seems very strange as he does not plan ahead at all (?) Or maybe I miss something?

Eh, I was originally gonna be flip and say “because ripping someone’s face off with a harpoon is way more badass” but then you got me thinking about guns in Fury Road. If I wander a bit far afield from what you were originally asking, hopefully it’s to interesting places.

For a movie that’s almost constant action, guns don’t play as big a role in the combat of Fury Road as you might think. In the world of the Citadel and its allies, Before-time pistols and rifles are kind of an elite weapon. Warlords and Imperators have them, but War Boys and Polecats mostly don’t. They have car-mounted machine guns and harpoon launchers, and all kinds of DIY weapons, some of which fire projectiles, but they mostly rely on throwing shit with their bare hands. (Given this, the fact that Furiosa has not just one or two but something like nine guns in her rig should tell you something about her status.)

Fury Road is also not one of those movies where the heroes have magically regenerating ammunition–in fact, being low on ammunition is a major plot point. So it’s possible that when Max is hunting around for more ammo after shooting at Slit, there just isn’t any left in that caliber. But more generally, if you don’t have infinite bullets you’re going to use your guns when they’ll be most effective.

When thinking about self-defense, remember that this is Fury Road, so no one fights alone. Furiosa is used to fighting with a team. So for the first part of the battle, when she’s driving, her self-defense is actually other people. She does plan ahead for that part of the battle, by stationing her kinswomen–who all happen to be really good shots–all over the rig, and on a moving bike that can weave around and pick people off. 

Even though Furiosa is also a good shot, she’s already using her strongest weapon in this situation, which is a giant fast murder truck that she’s really good at driving.

In general, Max and Furiosa use guns and other projectile weapons when their targets are at range. Furiosa uses an explosive crossbow bolt on the Polecat who kills Keeper, and Max (rather rudely) uses the ramrod from one of the other Vuvalini’s rifles to shoot Chainsaw Polecat before he can attack Furiosa.

But the final battle, more than any of the other action sequences, involves a lot of boarding of vehicles and a lot of hand-to-hand fighting. Except for Babyface McStabby, who has some kind of crossbow, most of the Polecats have melee weapons. None of them seem to have guns.

If a Polecat is swinging some weaponized garden equipment at you, it may be more effective to whack them with the heavy metal boltcutters that are already in your hand than to take the time to draw a gun, even if you have one. One of the things that makes the fights in Fury Road exciting is that anything can become a weapon, and in hand-to-hand combat an everyday object may prove more useful than a gun.

You may ask why Furiosa doesn’t take a gun with her to the Gigahorse. Maybe she thinks there are enough weapons on board that she’ll be able to figure something out. Maybe she doesn’t really have much of a plan at that point other than to stay alive long enough to fuck some shit up. She says “I’ll get him out of our way.” There are many potential ways to do that, although because of action movie conventions we know she is probably going to end up killing him. I think at that point it’s clear that she’s ready to die. So self-defense in that moment isn’t really about her long-term survival, but about living long enough to finish the mission. Similarly, Max launching himself at Rictus is more about him distracting Rictus from Furiosa than Max necessarily winning the fight.

Regarding “thinking ahead” more generally, one of the other things that’s great about the action sequences in Fury Road, and all the Mad Max movies, is how much unintended consequences and pure dumb luck come into play. To pick just one small example: Furiosa brakes to stop this Polecat from attacking Max:

But that means Babyface Polecat is able to hang on to the Rig and come back to stab her…

…which he probably wouldn’t have been able to do if Toast had been in her seat on that side of the Rig and/or Keeper hadn’t been dying.

Fury Road is full of examples like this, and this sense of chaos and unpredictability is part of George Miller’s style of action. Here’s a really good short video that goes into this idea some more:

From a character perspective, what this means is that characters can make an elaborate plan (how long did Furiosa spend planning every aspect of this escape?) and things will probably go sideways and they’ll have to think on their feet anyway. The race back to the Citadel wasn’t part of Furiosa’s original plan at all–24 hours earlier she was going to the Green Place, expecting never to see the Citadel again.

What makes Max and Furiosa great warriors and survivors is their ability to improvise, react quickly and not panic, fight with what’s around them, and make shit up as they go along just well enough to stay alive.

How To Develop A Distinct Voice In Your Writing

Voice in writing is extremely important and can make or break your story as a whole. It’s imperative that you pay attention to how readers interpret your writing voice because loving the author’s storytelling style can sometimes be just as important as the story itself. Here are some tips to remember and some general rules to follow in order to make sure your writing voice is enjoyable to listen to for your audience.


General Introduction & Some Things To Note

  • Voice is an audience’s ability to read something and know you wrote it. It’s essentially your fingerprint on your work.
  • The syntax is how an author chooses to order words in a sentence and can play a large role in conveying your voice.
  • Voice does not have to be yours alone, but more on that later.

How To Develop Your Voice

Rule 1: Write Naturally

Use voice as a tool, but don’t let it control you. Don’t try to force voice into your writing. Forcing voice can make it sound awkward and push the reader away. 

Rule 2: Always Write For Clarity First

Be as clear as possible. Don’t embellish or use fancy words if unnecessary. If writing poetry, however, do the exact opposite.

Rule 3: Don’t Deviate Too Much From The Rules Of Writing

Doing this can alienate your readers. If you break the everyday rules too much and deviate from the technical conventions of writing, your readers may get distracted or lose track of what you’re trying to convey and what’s going on in the story as a whole.

Writing In Somebody Else’s Voice

A lot of authors choose to write stories from the point of view of a character in their story. Authors may also choose to write in a format that requires their voice to be that of someone who may be completely different than them. Being able to recognize small details that form a voice in your readers’ heads is very important, whether you’re telling them the story as yourself or through the eyes of another. Here are some tips on developing a voice that matches the point of view you are telling the story from:

Word Choice ~ Use words and phrases that are true to the character’s personality. If your character is a 21st-century teenager talking about some guy they’re “totally obsessed” with and want to “Netflix and Chill” with, then they probably won’t describe him as a “harrowing barbarian with golden flowing locks and a stone cold thirst for vengeance”. 

Observation ~ Be careful when describing what your narrator observes throughout the story. If your narrator is supposed to be somewhat oblivious or gullible, they won’t notice the incredibly subtle mannerisms in everyone around them in order to conveniently draw conclusions and convey every piece of information the reader needs to predict the ending of the story.

Focus ~ Be mindful of what your narrator focuses on when describing a situation or the people around them. If your narrator chooses to point out that a character they don’t like happens to have the latest Rolex, this will hint at the reader that the character has a distaste for those with lots of wealth and therefore is somewhat of the opposite of the person they dislike. The things a person focuses on can tell you a lot about who they are and what they think of the world, and that is a massive deal when it comes to voice.

Descriptions ~ How your character describes the situations and minute details is important. Whether they say “shuddered” instead of “shook” or “steamed” instead of “angry” plays a large part in the reader getting to know your narrator.


Request a prompt list/writing advice/playlist/study help post here

On Styles’ self-titled debut album, out May 12, he eschews slick production and sharp hooks. But he still synthesizes influences from the last half-century of rock, so much so that you can practically travel through history on the back of his references. The anxious opener ‘Meet Me in the Hallway’ has a riff straight out of Jefferson Airplane’s 'White Rabbit,’ while the operatic lead single 'Sign of the Times’ channels David Bowie. 'Kiwi’ is straight-up grunge, full of rage, and 'Two Ghosts’ sounds like late-'90s adult-contemporary radio, in the best way. Working with veteran producer Jeff Bhasker (Kanye West, Mark Ronson), Styles has crafted a grownup rock sound that doesn’t pander.

Styles’ lyrics can be opaque, which makes the confessional final track, 'From the Dining Table,’ all the more important. It’s a vulnerable ode to the lonely hotel room, the curse of the famous. The song not only proves Styles’ talent as a storyteller but also shows that he may potentially be as good at looking inward as at looking backward in time.
—  Harry Styles’ Solo Album Is an Unexpected Tour of Rock History - TIME
LEGO Elves: Secrets of Elvendale |episode 1 only!

Aside from the fact that

I may not have been the target audience for this show’s…storytelling style……….and the voice acting………………………and that I aged ten years when I heard elfie 

lmaooooooooo

and the characters have no peripheral vision whatsoever

bruh ur house about to get burnt

I think the characters are so cute! Tidus’ design is my favourite! 

And I love the dragons so much :’D 

!!!!!!!!!!! babs!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

bahahahahahahhahahahahaha

The scenery is sooooooo pretty too!!! 

and they added shooting stars bruh. shooting stars.

bless

This was towards the end of the episode and I know the tree is burning but it looked so beautiful :’(

everyone is so pretty

//////////////////////////////

but stupid apparently

this particular scene made me laugh so hard:


Man: (yelling) Help! Help me!

-Someone was in “trouble” and they all just …lmaoooo stood around discussing it instead of running over lmaoooooooo


Presenting: the guy who was in trouble adsdgslkgdorjkl

lmaooo I distrusted him before he even made his appearance and I made a whole post about the events and then tumblr ate the post :’) 

I WONDER

but yeah, basically:

super cool

i love it when I’m right

super cooooooooool

nice

ALSO? FARRAN IS MY LIL GAY DISASTER BABY AND I HAVE A WHOLE POST SCREAMING ABOUT IT 

i’m not ashamed to confess I’m gonna watch the whole show just for Farran my child and out of the smugness of being right about this villain kid cronan :’) lmaooo

ladytemeraire  asked:

So my mom and I LOVE to read each other stories, and tonight's the first time I've been home in roughly three months. I just spent like an hour reading her stuff from your family lore tag and we are both in tears of laughter. During the peach tree story we were laughing so hard neither of us could breathe and the dog started freaking out because he thought we were upset-crying. Thank you for sharing these stories with us; you have an excellent storytelling style!

This is the sweetest message I’ve ever received and I’ve been slow to reply because I keep reading it over and over.  So have a short:

When mom was in grad school she took karate because 1. Illinois is a creepy place sometimes so maybe she should learn some self defense and 2. Being 4′11″ gives you a major edge in karate in the early stages, because lower center of gravity.

Her instructor was this huge black relentlessly chipper dude from Jamaica named “Luiz”, who was also a chronic over-baker and made truly excellent cinnamon rolls.  Mom loves cinnamon rolls and karate, and advances up the belt line fairly quickly, so when they stand in belt order, she’s always first.  (She ultimately got to black belt but at this point I think she was still blue), so when it’s time to count off for the katas, mom always counts first.  mom didn’t know a lick of Japanese, so she was essentially parroting Sensei Luiz, but hey, it works.

One day, Sensei Luiz comes in and tells everyone they need to scrub the dojo within an inch of it;s life and shape up on various other things, because HIS Sensei was coming, and this was a Big Deal.  So everyone deep-cleans the dojo and there are double practices that week, and Mom makes a particular note of making sure to count correctly.

Sensei’s Sensei arrives (mom regrets she can’t remember his name), and he’s actually from Japan, on a Grand Road Trip to see all of the American students he’d trained over the years. BIIIIIG DEAL.  So sensei sits down to watch how Sensei Luiz conducts a lesson.  So Mom, being first in line, is first to count off.  She gets as far as “Go”  when Sensei’s Sensei bursts out, howling with laughter, and she is horrifed-  did she mix up the numbers?

Eventually he calms down and apologizes for the outburst.   “I’m very sorry- I just wasn’t expecting to hear a White girl count in Japanese with a Jamaican Accent.”

Turns out everyone spoke that way and Senei’s Sensei found that unfailingly hilarious but was very pleased with how Luiz ran his dojo and Mom’s ability to remain calm while tossing football players around the mat.

I was talking about it on my twitter the other night but the reply on this post helps put into perspective of the point I was trying to get at, so i’m going to reiterate it here now that I have a clearer understanding of what i was trying to say:

I know a lot of SP fans have been anticipating when we get to see stuff like Craig and Tweek kiss or have more expressions of physical affection for each other to validate to the audience their love for each other, and don’t get me wrong, while I’d be more than thrilled to see that in canon too, I was thinking about the fact that I personally don’t feel a need to see it nor do I expect it?
I’m not watching South Park episodes banking on “when are they going to have an episode where Craig and Tweek kiss” and I don’t really get torn up when I see them not sitting next to each other in the background of new episodes and so forth, and think there’s a couple of reasons for that. 

One being I feel like it doesn’t really match up with the storytelling style of the show. The way South Park tends to portray relationships between the kids was never really built on seeing tons of physical puppy love affection from them unless there is a specific reason to (In the case with Heidi and Cartman it was to contrast how out of character that feels for him, and that relationship went to shit pretty fast anyways), and honestly, the show has already given us way more than I would have ever dreamed possible for a ship like Creek to get. I mean, they get a whole episode about learning how to communicate and a huge focus in the new game. 

Then the other reason is because Craig and Tweek’s relationship is written so explicitly in showing that they are together, you don’t really, need to see that to validate the fact that they love and care about each other? I think a lot of fans are waiting for them to have some magical kiss or whatever to prove they are in love, but what’s interesting about the show is like the comment in the post I linked above stated, Matt and Trey did completely skip the puppy love part of a relationship in writing Craig and Tweek and jump right into the parts that really show how much you love someone in the more subtle but powerful ways. Not only that but it seems that they use idea of people wanting to see the two be affectionate as the specific thing they parody, via the yaoi art, etc. which matches up because most of the fans create their own content to indulge in that aspect of their relationship. 

Due to that I feel like a lot of that side of their relationship is going to be kept framed in that yaoi art parody context. HOWEVER, that’s not necessarily a bad thing because if you are someone who isn’t familiar with this aspect of a relationship, it might go over one’s head, but the way Craig and Tweek’s relationship is written is with a huge focus on healthy communication and learning to work through problems and just being there for each other and supporting each other. This is all the stuff that comes into a relationship that will literally make or break it once you get past all the initial hand holding and kissing and cuddling fun part of it. It’s the part that requires all the actual work and really says how much do you care about this person and whether or not you are compatible in a healthy way. People are individuals and there will always be times where you will argue or fight with someone no matter how much you love them, and what matters is how those issues are handled.

The fact that this is the part of the relationship between Craig and Tweek that is focused on, especially from the standpoint of them actually working through their differences and wanting to be together says 1000x more about how much they really love each other than any on-screen kiss will. You don’t need to see them physically show how much they love each other because it’s literally all right there in how they interact with each other by creating a solid foundation that will allow them to stay together as a couple in the long run.

I find it super interesting that this is what the focus became for their canon relationship because not only is it just validating how GOOD of a relationship Craig and Tweek have, it’s also saying that people will always argue and have disagreements no matter what and this is what a real relationship takes, this is how two people learn to work through their differences to be together in a healthy way. It’s teaching a beautifully mature lesson about loving someone else (intentional or not, I’m at a loss) and it is a million times more validating in why I find Craig and Tweek’s relationship so satisfying as is and just a WONDERFUL portrayal of relationships on a bigger scale, not just in giving LGBT representation. 

Not to compare to SU, but I find Craig and Tweek’s relationship to be more powerful for relationship representation as a whole than say even Ruby and Sapphire’s relationship because even though they DO have on-screen kissing and cuddling, you don’t really get to see the characters exist outside of each other or work through relationship issues in a way that really shows who they are as individuals and what it is that builds their love for each other because they weren’t written to exist outside of each other. Ruby and Sapphire were written to be a relationship and in a way that flattens them as characters and makes it hard to see them beyond that. Meanwhile, Craig and Tweek were already solidly defined characters on their own so you know that they could easily break up and go off on their own narrative-wise because that’s how they were before, so the fact that they do work through their issues and stay together is so much more powerful and teaches so much more. 

The TLDR point: Craig and Tweek have such a wonderfully written relationship that you don’t really need to see puppy love or kissing from them to prove what is obviously already there, and that’s why I’m perfectly content just indulging in that part of their relationship in fandom instead of seeing it in canon because canon already gave us the most important and best part of a good relationship.  

(Find the others in the things I want to see tag.)

Things I Want To See Less Of: Part One

Homogeneous Fantasy Races: So. You’ve got your world. You’ve got your cultures and peoples. You’ve got their countries and their governments. You’re even able to describe them when asked: “They’re a [this] kind of people, characterized by [this look, this skin tone, these eye and hair colors].” That’s great, because your audience can all of a sudden immediately identify where a person is from based on how they look. … Yeah. Great. Because our world looks like that. Ever. Where are the people who’ve moved, the people whose parents moved? Where’s the cultural diffusion and people who don’t always wear their nationality on their sleeve? “This person is [from here], clearly! Look at their [coloration].” Please stop. It’s so, so common for fantasy stories to have the market-towns as their stage, where the diversity of their other cultures more easily comes to the foreground because these towns are where people naturally congregate for a purpose, but it’s unrealistic for all travelers ever to only go to those towns. Please open up the border fences and stop thinking of your peoples as monoliths. Also, lose the “foreigner as a novelty” theme. Show me peoples that have taken in immigrants over the centuries, who no longer remember that they were immigrants, who call them one of their own. Show me peoples whose traditions have morphed over time as people from other places have come in and established their identities in this new place. Show me dynamic races that have grown and changed over time, that don’t feel as though they were established a decade ago.

First Person With Overly “Quirky” Narrative Styles: There’s nothing wrong with first person storytelling, so don’t get me wrong here. There are certain stories that crave the first person technique to be executed well. What I’m tired of are the crazy-strong, super prominent, usually dry and quippy and sarcastic voices that go with them and have over-saturated the story with that first person viewpoint. I know: “But Pear! That’s what they tell you to do so that your story stands out!” I get it. I do. But many of these voices, recently, have been too strong for me, too distracting to the story or prohibitive to my understanding of the world that they feel a bit forced. Not just that the persona is forced, but that I am being forced–forced to be an inhabitant of this world in order to understand the story or not to understand at all. The invitation in through the door is gone. Now, of course, this is personal preference. In fact, all of these “things I want to see” posts are pure personal preference. I’m exhausted by authors’ attempts to validate their choice of first person through the over-use of world-slang and catch phrases and dry cynicism. They want to provide a peek into this character’s head, but that attempt to show that voice inside doesn’t always feel natural to me or even deepen the breadth of worldbuilding. Show me characters who know their world but don’t require me to be a native. Show me first person narratives that have restraint in their delivery of worldbuilding so that I can learn it. Show me voices that are strong without requiring me to wear their skin. Show me comfortable characters that have some joy and want to share their world.

The Throes of Romance: Again, don’t get me wrong. There’s a time and place, and if you’re writing a romance story, there’d better be romance. I’m also not saying no romance ever. I’m just exhausted of reading a story and finding all the cliche little moments of a tell-tale budding romance between two characters. It seems to be the same phrases, the same internal conflicts, the same choices over and over and over. Generally, if a story has a male and a female protagonist, there will be a romance. I’m tired of it being a necessary check-box writers think they have to include in order to have a successful story. What you need is a compelling relationship between your characters; what that doesn’t mean is that it has to be romantic. And if you do want it to be romantic, find new ways to show it outside of the historical phrases. Show me more friendships that are strengthened or shredded by the events they go through. Show me more families who stand together despite that all Mom’s got to contribute is one hell of a swing with an old iron. Show me found family without the scenes upon scenes of sideways glances and admiring of jawlines and luscious hair in the breeze and turning away to allow them to change and the electric feeling of skin touching skin. Show me the depth two people can establish in a relationship without needing to go through the cliched romantic motions.

Narrative Voice

Narrative voice is one of those things editors and agents look out for as a sign of raw talent. It’s something people say can’t be taught. Either you have it or you don’t. 

This may be true, partly, but it doesn’t mean that you can’t make any conscious decisions about your narrative voice. 

I love playing around with my voice in different pieces that I write, and I thought I would share some advice on how you could have some fun with your own narrative voice as well. 

I would argue that in most novels, about 50% of voice comes from the author’s own voice and natural storytelling abilities. This may change overtime, but mostly it’s just you. Writing as you write. The other 50%, I’d say comes down to writing like your narrator is telling a story to an audience. This means asking yourself two questions.

1. WHO IS TELLING THE STORY?

This is pretty simple in 1st person point of view: know who your character is and let them tell the story. Know what their opinions are. What interests them. The things they like and dislike. If they’re angry or optimistic or scared. If they use slang or speak like a professor. A voice should grow naturally out of that information. 

In 3rd person, when your narrator is a non-participant, there are two options:

The first is to tell the story strictly as yourself, in 100% your own voice, and let it change naturally as you suit it to fit your story. This means being confident in your abilities as a storyteller and just telling the story. 

The other option is to put on a costume. This narrator is you, but perhaps it is you as a grandfather, or you as a historian, or simply of yourself as someone funnier or wittier than you think you actually are. It’s still your voice. It’s still you telling the story, but you’re drawing out a particular aspect of your voice that enhances the story you’re telling

This option is more complicated than the others. This is consciously changing your voice. I believe it can be done: that grandfather might help you get into a certain mindset if you want your story to have that kindly touch of “Mr. and Mrs. Dursley of Number 4 Privet Drive were proud to say…” Thinking of yourself as a historian might add a formal sort of flare to your high fantasy novel. Believing you’re hilarious may give you the confidence to put sillier elements into your story.

2. WHO ARE THEY TELLING IT TO?

I don’t mean this in terms of who you imagine is going to read your book. That’s a different matter entirely. What I’m talking about here is the narrator’s audience. This is usually just an audience imagined by the author, unless the format of the novel is epistolary or journal entry, or the narrator references them outright. Even so, it can be helpful to remember, however, that every story is told to someone. This can be intentional or unintentional, but it drastically changes how the story is told. 

Here are some types of audiences:

  • A friend, which means they’re telling the story in an honest and casual manner, as though the reader is someone they trust with their innermost thoughts. I would say this is the most common “audience” for a novel told in the 1st person.
    • ex. The Shades of London series by Maureen Johnson
  • Someone they want to persuade, which depending on their character could mean being unreliable and defensive, or confessional and apologetic. They might be keeping a few secrets about their thoughts and feelings from the reader, and maybe even lying to the reader and/or themselves
    • ex. The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
  • Historical record, which is not actually for historical record, but a more formal 3rd person that doesn’t focus on interacting with the reader so much as honestly reporting thoughts and events as they occur. I would say that this is one of the most common “audiences” for a novel written in 3rd person.
    • ex. A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin
  • An audience referenced in the text itself. This is a book in full story-telling mode, where a 3rd person narrator both refers to the imagined audience and the fact that they are telling a story directly on the page. This is an older style of storytelling used to be more common than it is today. The imagined audience can be a certain type of reader (children in many classic children’s books). It can also be an audience that only exists in the word of the story itself, like prospective dragon naturalists. 
    • ex. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien 
    • ex. A Natural History of Dragons by Marie Brennan

Once you’ve settled these two matters, you have a structure for your narrative voice in place. The rest, depends on your voice as an author, and for that I can only give the following advice:

  1. Read. Pay close attention to the voices of the books you admire, the way the narrative interacts with you as a reader and with the events of the text. Consider why you admire certain storytelling features and how you might implement similar features in your own writing. 
  2. Write and write a lot. Every word you put on the page is a choice you’ve made. Every choice you make will hone your voice, completely subconsciously. 
  3. Have fun telling your story. Don’t worry about the voice being polished or “good,” just tell the story in a way that’s enjoyable for you. If you’d like, experiment with different styles. Practice telling stories in the voices of people who don’t sound exactly like you. Try on ridiculous costumes. When you have fun telling a story, your reader will have fun listening to it. 

Teachers must ditch ‘neuromyth’ of learning styles, say scientists

Teaching children according to their individual “learning style” does not achieve better results and should be ditched by schools in favour of evidence-based practice, according to leading scientists.

Thirty eminent academics from the worlds of neuroscience, education and psychology have signed a letter to the Guardian voicing their concern about the popularity of the learning style approach among some teachers.

They say it is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging as it can lead to a fixed approach that could impair pupils’ potential to apply or adapt themselves to different ways of learning.

The group opposes the theory that learning is more effective if pupils are taught using an individual approach identified as their personal “learning style”. Some pupils, for example, are identified as having a “listening” style and could therefore be taught with storytelling and discussion rather than written exercises.

The academics say the learning style approach is ineffective, a waste of resources and potentially even damaging. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

Adult Home Study for Hellenic and Roman Polytheists 

How do we know what we know about the gods? Much of our knowledge comes from mythology: ancient tales about the gods, fantastic creatures, heroes, and mortals.

There is another meaning of the word “myth”: “widely held, but false, ideas or beliefs,” and all too many of the readily available sources of information about mythology fit that definition. A vast majority of the general population discovers Greek and Roman mythology from motion pictures, video games, and general texts like D'Aulaires Book of Greek Myths and Edith Hamilton’s Mythology. A few more have read Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Ovid’s Metamorphosis, and Apuleius’ Golden Ass.

Yet more scholarly, in-depth resources are available to polytheists who want to learn about mythology. The fields of history, archaeology, anthropology, religion, literary criticism, art history and psychology all look at mythology from different perspectives.

  • History examines how the myths were composed, who told or wrote them, and what people said about them.
  • Archaeology identifies mythological motifs found on objects and structures, and tries to determine their meaning to those who viewed and used them.
  • Anthropology seeks to understand the cultural reasons for the creation and  transmission of myths, and the relation of myth to rituals such as rites of passage such as the transition to adulthood, marriage, and death.
  • Religion regards myths as sacred stories that explain the creation of the universe, and teach moral truths, and seeks to understand the relationship between mythology, belief, and ritual.
  • Literary criticism investigates the sources of myths, the oral art of storytelling, motifs and themes, the composition of texts, style, meaning, and comparison of different versions.
  • Art history focuses on images from mythology throughout history, the religious and symbolic meanings, and artistic techniques. 
  • Psychology delves into the myths as archetypes and symbols, expressions of the collective unconscious, or as a symbolic language to help individuals find meaning and negotiate challenges.

You’ll notice there’s some overlap between these fields. And you should remember that scholars don’t talk to people outside their fields as much as they should.

Many people are initially drawn to the gods after viewing a work of art or reading a story. Some of us have an experience in nature, or in an altered state of consciousness. Becoming aware of a deity is known as an ephipany or personal gnosis, a subjective perception or experience of the presence of the divine. It can be a feeling that a place is sacred, a sense that there is a greater power than ourselves in the universe, or a realization that a higher power has brought about a particular situation.

So, how we know what we know about the gods is…complicated. To really know something, one must regard it from different angles, and take time to understand it. Taken altogether, it’s fairly obvious that each of us necessarily has a different interpretation of mythology, depending on our personal study and experiences.

Unfortunately, many Hellenic and Roman and polytheists have only read the basic mythology titles listed above in their study of the gods. A few more have read books on devotional practice, but most of us haven’t gone much further in our studies. And, because the sources we’ve read just scratch the surface of available knowledge about the gods, our understanding is so superficial that many of us lack the vocabulary to describe our beliefs, and may even harbor misconceptions about one or more gods that harms our relationship with them. Not only does this impede our spiritual progress, but it makes it difficult to talk about our religion to another person. “I worship the gods of the ancient Greeks,” really tells them nothing, except that one is a polytheist.

Since you’re reading this, I assume your religion is an important part of your life, and, if so, your understanding of it deserves to be developed to the best of your ability. I realize not everyone is interested in or has the temperament for research, and that books can be expensive and difficult to obtain. However, most libraries have sections on the fields above, quite a lot of solid information is available online, and it can be done in easy-to-digest bites.

Here are some ideas for study that can help to enrich your understanding and interpretation of mythology:

  • Read about a Mystery cult, a hero cult, the cult of the nymphs, the Roman Imperial cult or the deified personifications of the virtues in ancient Greece and Rome.
  • Visit a museum and learn about the archaeology of the regions in which your deities were historically worshiped.
  • Learn the names and significant events of the different time periods in the ancient Mediterranean. How did agriculture, literacy, mathematics and theater affect society and religion?
  • Mark the locations of temples dedicated to one of your deities on a map. Are they focused in one area, or are they widespread? What conclusions can you make based on this information?
  • Read the Orphic hymn(s) about a deity to whom you feel little connection, and read a list of their epithets and cult titles. Think about whether the deity seems more approachable, or just as inaccessible.
  • Study a work of mythological art. What does it tell you about the meaning of the subject in the era in which it was created?
  • Read an article on Hellenic or Roman mythology from the viewpoint of of a modern monotheistic or polytheistic religion.  
  • Learn a bit about C.G. Jung’s psychological theories and use of mythic symbols, or Joseph Campbell’s monomyth.
  • Choose a favorite myth and see how many different versions you can find. Are the versions from different times, different places? Do they  have similar or different meanings?
  • Learn some of the terms used by scholars to describe key concepts in the study of religion. Which of the concepts applies to your own beliefs and practice?
  • Prepare a meal from an ancient recipe using ingredients that were available in antiquity.
  • Find out what the ancient philosophers and critics thought about an epic poem or drama.  
  • Select an art or skill favored by one of your gods, study it, and try applying in your own life. For instance, you could dedicate a study of strategy in honor of Minerva and apply one of the techniques to help win a game, or learn a little about weaving to make a wall hanging to honor Athena.
  • Choose an ancient war. What issue(s) led to conflict? How was it resolved? What were the chief deities of each side? Did religion, omens, or religious rites play any part in the warfare? Were there heroes of the war? Were legends told about them? Were they given offerings such as a monument or hero-shrine? 

The more one studies, the more one can deepen their relationship with their deities, the more clearly one may be able to explain their religion to others, and the better equipped one may become to counter criticism of their beliefs.

humans are space orcs- stories

My contribution to the Humans are Space Orcs thread- stories.
Humanity has a fascination with stories unmatched in the civilized Galaxy.
We read, tell, invent, and retell stories with an alaracity unknown to most aliens. While many cultures do have mythologies and hero-stories, these are mostly accounts of actual historical events in oral form. Their heroes are actual people, and their accounts are dry and factual. They are purely meant to inform.
Humans, however, are a completely different story. From the earliest mythologies, stories have been told. Even when humanity entered the age of science and reason, stories continued on. We have stories about magic, stories about science, adventure, love, loss, ends, beginnings- you name it, we have a story about it.
And we don’t just tell these stories, oh no- we write them. Most aliens, whose writing systems are used almost entirely for what we would consider nonfiction, are baffled by the assortment of novels at the library.
“Are these accounts of alternate universes?” They ask in bewilderment.
Their human guides scratch their necks and say, “Nah. They’re not real.”
“Why are they written then?”
“To entertain, mostly. Or make a point. To enable people to escape their lives, I guess.”
“Why?”
And don’t even get me started on movies- so much time and effort spent in something whose sole purpose is to entertain. Effects, cameras, actors- that’s a fun discussion.
“Who is this James Bond? Isn’t it dangerous for a covert operative’s movements to be broadcast like so?” The aliens ask.
“He isn’t real, he’s just a character.” The humans say. “An invention of a writer.”
“Then who is that man? The one on the screen?”
“He’s an actor. His job is to pretend to be other people.”
Aliens are disturbed by the concept of a living being made on deception. An alert, one of many, is sent to the leaders about human’s ability to lie so seemingly easily with their entire bodies.
No human is entirely immune, even if they are not entirely fictional. Old men’s fishing stories, frat boy’s conquest stories, mothers’ stories about their children, even the children have their own stories that they made up entirely on their own. Everyone has a different style of storytelling, and some cultures have a traditional style as well. Some styles have grown obsolete. Some styles are considered boring. However, the fact remains that the most prominent and lasting influence on humanity as a whole are the storytellers. Human civilization is essentially built on word-craft and lies.
The aliens are unsure what to make of this.

Casca. Belongs to Mairi. 

Berserk had been in my head for quite a long time now, the Eclipse arc marked me a lot. I don’t know to what point I’ll keep reading this manga but it keeps fascinating me. The characters, the storytelling, the style of Kentaro Miura, everything keeps drawing me in more and more. And yes Casca is one of my favourite things about this manga. And this fanart is just a way to show my own representation of her and how much I like her. Take care people <3 

historyofashitpost  asked:

What are your favorite podcasts?

hi there i’ll make you a list.

fiction:

  • the penumbra podcast: twilight zone-style episodic trope bending & frankly the best thing in the universe
  • wolf 359: the (mis)adventures of a crew of people working on a station orbiting the star wolf 359
  • eos 10: scrubs meets deep space nine - the adventures of the medical crew on a  space station
  • homecoming: psychological thriller (feat. oscar isaac!!!!)
  • limetown: audio drama about a reporter investigating the disappearance of a town full of people
  • the black tapes podcast: a reporter profiles a skeptic determined to disprove the supernatural. demons galore. these people also make tanis & rabbits which i like less.
  • ars paradoxica: time travel!
  • alice isn’t dead: a truck driver searches for her missing wife

nonfiction / politics ( i got a bit into the ‘npr shows that didn’t used to be podcasts but now are because that’s how i listen to the radio now’ genre but.)

  • s-town: recent & by the folks who produce serial & this american life (both of which you should listen to also) about hidden treasure, family history, the south. so good. 
  • & related this american life: dare i say the original podcast-style in-depth slice-of-life storytelling show. the best forever (i have a pillow with ira glass’s face on it)
  • dan carlin’s hardcore history: hardcore dives into the past.
  • call your girlfriend: two best friends discuss pop culture, feminism, politics, race & everything in between
  • pod save america / crooked media anything: i linked to pod save america but everything these absolute idiots produce is great & interesting & hysterical. four of obama’s former political aides talk politics post-trump. 
  • radiolab presents more perfect: in-depth reporting about interesting cases in the supreme court. also, listen to radiolab. 
  • death sex and money: discussions about the things we don’t like to talk about in polite conversation
  • astonishing legends: looks at strange & unusual events through history, based in real-world evidence
  • 2 dope queens: phoebe robinson & jessica williams are the funniest people in the whole world!