the story of the three bears

John’s started reading classic fairy tales to Rosie at bedtime. Here are Sherlock’s reviews (on a scale of 1 to 5 stars):

Little Red Riding Hood:  ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“I admire the girl’s independence, but this idiot child doesn’t recognize the difference between her beloved grandmother and a dangerous WOLF? The SAME WOLF she met in the forest less than an hour ago? And you think MY disguises are silly…”

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs:   ☆ ☆ ☆

“I like the part about the Evil Queen demanding Snow White’s heart – nice and macabre. So Snow White runs away to the forest and becomes a housekeeper for a gang of diminutive gay miners?  They should’ve just ended the story there – I don’t care for all that pointless, predictable nonsense about the poison apple and the prince.”

Goldilocks and the Three Bears:  ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“If those bears were any worse at deduction, they’d work for New Scotland Yard.” 

“Thought you might relate to Goldilocks, love – you’re both picky, impatient, show zero respect for others’ personal property…” 

“Oh please, John. Goldilocks is a moron – now, if Rosie wants to learn how to perform a proper home invasion…”  

No.”

The Three Little Pigs:  ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“It’s a scam, obviously. At least two of these pig brothers are guilty of insurance fraud, and the third may be in on it as well. A wolf BLEW your house down? While straw and sticks may not be the sturdiest of building materials, the lung capacity of the average fully grown Canis lupus is not great enough to produce the force necessary to demolish even an exceedingly shoddy dwelling.”

The Little Mermaid:  ★ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“Why no pirates? Would be better with pirates.”

Rapunzel:  ☆ ☆ ☆

“I’d like to know Rapunzel’s diet, genetic makeup (or at least ethnicity), cranial circumference, surface area of her scalp, the height of the tower, the surrounding climate and humidity level, what sort of shampoo/conditioner she used, whether or not she used hairspray or styling product …numerous variables affect the tensile strength and growth rate of human hair, you know…“

Sleeping Beauty:  ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

“Sleep is tedious.”

Cinderella:  ☆ ☆ 

“I love a ball. The ball is good – beautiful gown, the prince in his dress uniform, love at first sight, dancing the night away, AND a mystery! Yet it’s all ruined because I can’t stand the utter STUPIDITY of trying the glass slipper on every eligible maiden in the land…it doesn’t take a deductive genius to recognize that’s a waste of time!”

Rumplestiltskin:   

“This one actually has some valuable lessons. For one thing, someone is always listening – royal minions in a fairy tale, Mycroft’s cameras and covert agents, the homeless network…we’re under surveillance of some sort at all times. Be vigilant, be aware, observe. Also, if you happen to have a ridiculous name, OWN IT – there’s no point trying to keep it a secret, because it’ll come out eventually, JOHN HAMISH WATSON.”  

In Honor of Earth Day 2017: PBS Nature’s Ask Box is now open for the next round of Tumblr’s IssueTime on Conservation and Climate Change!

NATURE  is so excited to work with Tumblr and the wonderful scientists, biologists and filmmakers who’ve agreed to be on our panel so that you can learn more about the environmental issues we’re currently facing.  Dig deeper into the issues with full episodes of NATURE, now streaming!

The Panelists:

Arnaud  Desbiez  is a conservation biologist who has been conducting research in the Brazilian Pantanal since 2002. He has worked on topics ranging from sustainable use of  resources  to  species  ecological  research and community  development  programs. In  the  Brazilian  Pantanal,  his  work  focused  on  the interaction  between  native  and alien  species, the sustainable  use  of  forage  resources  and  the  ecology  of  several mammal species.   In 2010 he started and now coordinates the Pantanal Giant Armadillo Project. Arnaud is featured in our most recent episode, Hotel Armadillo.

Patrick Gonzalez is Principal Climate Change Scientist of the U.S. National Park Service and a Visiting Scholar at the University of California, Berkeley. A forest ecologist, he conducts applied research on climate change and works with national parks to adapt resource management to climate change. Patrick has conducted and published field research on climate change in Africa, Latin America, and the United States and has served as a lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the organization awarded a share of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. Watch our recent episode about the challenges facing Yosemite, now streaming!

Chris Morgan is an ecologist, conservationist, educator, TV host/narrator and film producer specializing in international bear research and conservation. For more than 20 years, he has worked as a wildlife researcher, wilderness guide and environmental educator on every continent where bears exist. Chris  has narrated 13 films for Nature and was host and narrator for Siberian Tiger Quest as well as being the featured character in Nature’s three-part series ‘Bears of the Last Frontier.’ In 2015, he was also host and narrator for Nature’s Three-part ‘Animal Homes’ series and was featured in ‘The Last Orangutan Eden.’ Learn more about Chris’ story with this interview we conducted with him.

Learn More about Chris

Joe Pontecorvo is an award-winning producer, writer, and cinematographer. For the past two decades, he has traveled the globe; tracking Siberian tigers in the Russian Far East, living among grizzlies in the wilds of Alaska, and following orangutans through Indonesia’s peat swamp forest. All told, he has produced 14 broadcast documentaries for multiple networks, including National Geographic, Discovery Channel, and PBS. For his most recent project before ‘Yosemite,’ PBS Nature’s ‘Snow Monkeys,’ Joe and his wife, Nim Pontecorvo, spent nearly two years filming a troop of Japanese macaques in Japan’s Shiga Highlands. Go behind-the-scenes into the making of that film here.

Learn More about Joe

Happy Earth Day! Check back Saturday for answers! 

(Unfortunately our consistent party tends to be just three people: myself, my husband, and a friend of ours. When I’m DM, I’m almost constantly caught off guard by the things my players do. Even when I go out of my way to try and come up with every possible thing they could do, they manage to do something unexpected. Here’s a few examples…)

Bear Hunting

(Story is an elven man is a mentor to a young human boy. His parents died under mysterious circumstances; everyone believes a bear killed his parents. After some investigating, it was determined that the elven man killed both parents with arrows to the heart, on account of they were going to sell their son into slavery. This follows.)

Husband: I let the elf go and go hunting.

Me: Uh, okay. What are you hunting for?

Husband: A bear.

Me: ….. *retrieves Bestiary* Ooookay then…

(He eventually succeeds in killing two bears, then brought one to the boy as ‘the one that killed his parents’. I actually, honestly expected him to kill the elf mentor…)

Overreacting

(A young boy is causing a scene in a city, harassing some guards. My players come and get the situation calmed, getting the guards to leave. It turns out that the boy’s father was a wizard who was wrongfully executed and he’s taking out his anger on the guards. Then this happens…)

Me: The boy, still distraught, casts Magic Missile at (husband). Take 2 damage.

Husband: Ow.

Friend (a ninja): I jump kick the boy in the head.

Me: ….what.

Friend: *hard stare*

Me: …. (We roll appropriately) He takes 12 nonlethal damage and is knocked unconscious.

Friend: *to my husband, in character* Shall I dispatch this miscreant for you, master?

Husband: NO.

Brothel Battle

(A slaver ship captain is in a brothel. I expected the players to just wait on the docks for him to return. Instead, they split up and end up at the brothel together. One is an Inquisitor (husband), the other is a vigilante (friend). Both are male. I fully expect both of them to enter as patrons. Instead…)

Friend: I disguise myself as a woman named ‘Rose’.

Me: …..Okay.

Husband: *shaking head*

Friend: I go inside and pretend to be looking for a job.

(We RP him approaching the Madame, and her offering rates and such things for 'Rose’. Note that the vigilante’s hero name is “The Wild Rose”, the brothel’s name is “The Blooming Rose”, and the Madame’s name is “Rosa”. The place is also heavily guarded by false patrons wearing masks. Husband comes in as a patron looking for a woman of Rose’s exact description, so he’s escorted to her room as her first patron. Then they just wait in the room for the man they suspect to be the captain to come by. After actually yanking him into the room when he turned down Rose’s advances [he preferred strong women, but Rose was dainty and childlike], they fight, and win. However, an alert goes up. I expect the pair to jump out the window. Instead…)

Husband: I run out of the room and around the corner, duck into another room, and cast Invisibility on myself.

Friend: I scream and pretend (Inquisitor) killed my customer.

(They proceeded to escape and even took the captain’s boots before they left, both of them invisible at this point.)

A Whole New Use for Bear Traps

(Same as the previous game, the two are sneaking around the house of a rich family and spot bear traps in the garden. I expect them to either move the traps, spring them, or ignore them. Instead…)

Friend: I PICK UP THE BEAR TRAPS.

Me: ….Okay, you do so.

(Few moments later, after a successful perception check to notice footsteps nearby…)

Me: You hear someone sneaking around.

Friend: …..I HOLD THE BEAR TRAPS IN MY HANDS AND READY AN ATTACK.

Me: …..WHY.

(It was an ally of theirs sneaking around, but he barely managed to NOT get her head stuck in a bear trap. Later on he used them again on a guard. Rather than roll damage, I just accepted it as the guard died instantly. For his sake…)

7

I recently started following the zventenze blog because they’ve been posting a lot of Eastern European winter festivals and costumes, which introduced me to some of the stylin’est, greatest imagery I never knew about. SO GOOD. 

These remind me of my grandmother’s sets of unedited folklore from around the world, which captured my imagination as a child. The stories were always scarier, more surreal, and more beautiful than their post-Victorian retellings. My favorites – regardless of origin – gave me this same cozy-creepy feeling.

  • First three are Bulgarian kukeri, or mummers.
  • Next two are New Year’s bear dancers in eastern Romania, (which I’ve seen posted everywhere but only just learned the context.)
  • Last two are Kurants from the Kurentovanje Festival in Slovenia. 
carly’s pynch fic rec

basically, i’ve read a lot of fic, some of which i haven’t seen on rec lists on tumblr anywhere and i just thought that had to be remedied so: here we go. ten fics sorted by word count. most of them are multichapter, and rated M or E.

★★★★★144k+ words, rated M, completed

light with a sharpened edge by poetic_leopard aka @winterblues

Adam Parrish works as a sober companion, but he has no idea of the storm that’s soon to hit him when Ronan Lynch turns out to be his newest client. (Or the one where Adam Parrish and Ronan Lynch are trapped underneath the same roof for six weeks.)*Ronan, to his surprise, opened his eyes. For a breathless moment, Adam was transfixed in them. They were the color of the ocean on the most azure of nights, lightning right before it struck the ground, damp hydrangeas on a fog-swept morning. Those eyes gave him chills.

this fic!! solidly one of my favorite fics! (although, i’m only recommending my favorites) ronan is a little more of an asshole than usual, but, it’s an AU so.. it works. the writing in this is lovely and poetic and leaves you hanging off of every word. 

[more recs under the cut]

Keep reading

Country Solangelo!

I don’t know why this popped up in my head, but can we all just imagine Will Solace as a bona fide country boy?  Can we imagine Will dragging Nico home for a few weeks in Summer?

  • Naomi Solace, alt-country singer, having a fit when she sees how skinny Nico is, and insists on him having second helpings of everything?
  • Nico’s first taste of Non-Camp barbecue resulting in him getting about three more servings.
  • Will Solace’s childhood home not being in a suburb, but on a rural farm, complete with Horses, a garden full of vegetables, and a two story farmhouse with a wrap around porch.  Nico being in absolute awe when he first sees it.
  • Nico being scared to death about being introduced as Will’s boyfriend, mainly because he’s just deathly afraid that he’ll be rejected or hurt, but instead he’s given a bear hug by both Naomi and Will’s Grandmother, and given a proper handshake (which gives Nico a sense of his being old as hell) by Will’s maternal grandfather.  Even Will’s mortal friends don’t give a crap that they’re gay, which ends Nico’s thoughts on a stereotypical southern community.
  • Nico in overalls, which amuses Will to no end.  Will in a cowboy hat, which Nico insists he should wear more often.
  • Will showing Nico the grove of oak trees that his treehouse was built in.  Nico and Will subsequently making out in that treehouse.
  • Nico learning to ride Reba, Will’s favorite horse (and also his favorite Singer)
  • Skinny-dipping in a swimming hole, which Nico is hesitant to do, but relents.  He later drags Will out there in the middle of the night, which results in some hastily made up stories the next day.  Nico can’t walk because he was totally just riding Reba all Night.  Both know all too well that Nico bruised his tailbone trying to swing from a rope into the hole.
  • Campfires out by the old, dilapidated barn, complete with s’mores and a ton of cuddles.  Will telling Nico Ghost stories, and Nico pretending to be scared, if only to be in Will’s embrace.
  • Nico being afraid to touch the plants at first, as he is sure he doesn’t have a green thumb, to helping Grandma Solace weeding the garden on a daily basis, where the two discuss what life was like in the 30s.  Nico doesn’t remember much of the Great Depression, as he was young.  But he remembers the war too clearly.
  • Grandpa Solace telling stories of his time in the War, including D-Day.  When he peels his shirt off to show everyone the scars left by shrapnel, Will is beet red from embarrassment, and Nico is as pale as a ghost.
  • Will’s extended family descending on the farm for a few days, which results in hastily memorized names, a ton of photo opportunities, and a hay ride with Will and his cousins.  Later on, Will takes the rusted up truck and they go for a joyride, and maybe a late night shake.
  • Nico and Will being permitted to share a room, where they cuddle under a homemade quilt.  For once, Nico doesn’t have nightmares.
  • Nico getting a knitted sweater from Will’s Grandma, which is apparently a ‘Welcome to the Family’ gift.
  • Will being overjoyed at the fact that, by the time they leave, Nico’s gained some weight, a healthy glow, and the fact that maybe Nico’s addicted to his Grandmother’s lemonade.
  • Nico feeling more at home on a rural farm in Texas than he has nearly anywhere else, and insisting that they go back every chance they get.
  • Will happily obliging, on the condition that Nico has to wear the Overalls at least once every time they go.

I dunno why, but Country Boy Will is something I’ve found strangely cute these last few days.  Southern Hospitality is a thing, and Nico would be shaken by the fact that they aren’t as vocal about the gay thing as one may realize.

anonymous asked:

Hello! So sorry for bothering you but you've been a huge inspiration! Just wanted to ask: I know that keeping ideas and waiting for that dream pitch 10 years down the line is a bad practice and I should start doing the ideas I have NOW... but... would that hurt my idea's chances of ever seeing the big screen? If I make my lifelong dream idea into a webcomic NOW, will TV executives decline it later because its story is already “spoiled” and it’s set in stone in a sort of way?

No. Here’s proof:

Daniel Chong’s “The Three Bare Bears”

Matt Groening’s Life is Hell strips.

The Walking Dead by Robert Kirkman and Tony Moore

Scott Pilgrim by Bryan Lee O'Malley

The wikipedia page for every Marvel movie

A google search of “comic book movies”

There has quite literally, and I mean literal in the literal sense, NEVER been a time MORE suited for you to make a comic that can then be turned into a movie. In fact, TV and movie executives often like a comic to already exist because it’s easier to visualize what the movie or TV show will be like. There are, believe it or not, entire comic series’ that exist purely as a proof of concept for TV shows and movies down the line because that’s where the writers and artists know the big bucks are.

The idea that “what if my comic can’t be made into a movie because people have already read it” is another bullshit thing your brain is doing to make you give up and not make the thing.

It’s precisely BECAUSE it’s a comic that it will be EASIER to adapt it into something else!

Knock it off. MAKE THE THING.

(Note: This is the part 2 of the interview. To read part 1, click here.)

Stephen Anderson began his career at Disney as a storyboard artist on Tarzan. He then served as Head of Story on The Emperor’s New Groove and Brother Bear, before making the leap to director on Meet the Robinsons.

So how did Stephen first hook up with Disney, and how many Meet the Robinsons-related anecdotes can I squeeze from his brain? Let’s find out in the second part of our EXCLUSIVE three-part interview…


Part 2: Working at Disney


The Disney Elite: You started your career at Disney as a storyboard artist on Tarzan. How did that come about?


Stephen Anderson: I got to Disney through a colleague at Hyperion. I became friends with Kevin Lima, who came to Hyperion to direct a feature adaptation of Thumbalina. His co-director was Chris Buck, who had been my animation teacher at CalArts. I helped out on that film as much I could because I loved the idea and I loved working with those two. Eventually the project got shelved and those guys left. Kevin went to Disney and directed A Goofy Movie and after that, Disney wanted him to direct Tarzan. He chose Chris Buck as his co-director and so, because of those connections, I was able to become a part of their story team on Tarzan. We’ve all heard that cliche about how so much of success is who you know? This was a perfect example of that.





The Disney Elite: After working in Story on Tarzan, The Emperor’s New Groove and Brother Bear, you made the leap to director on Meet the Robinsons. Would you explain how you made that huge transition?


Stephen Anderson: First off, the only thing I wanted to do more than be an animator was to be a director. In fact, directing (and screenwriting/filmmaking in general) really took over the older I got. As a teenager, I started seeing more diverse kinds of movies, learning about filmmakers, reading about how movies are made, about screenplay structure, about what a director is, and I grew to love the idea of moviemaking. It was really the films of Steven Spielberg that changed my path and made me want to be a director. First off, the level of emotion and audience reaction that I saw and felt when I watched his films was something I wanted to be able to give to an audience someday. Loving his films then made me want to learn more about him so through reading articles and interviews and watching ‘making of’ specials, I decided that that’s what I wanted to do. So this was always the goal beyond the goal.


After Tarzan, I became interested in pursuing the Head of Story role and was fortunate to be asked to fill that role on Groove and on Brother Bear. I had asked, before Brother Bear, if I could be considered for a directing position in the future so we were already having that conversation. Since I’d been performing leadership roles, they were open to the idea. I helped develop a project for the studio on the side, during the last year of Brother Bear, with the thought that if it continued, I’d be the director. It did NOT continue. I finished Brother Bear, moved back to California (because we had to relocate to Orlando for that project), and was then handed a script for A Day with Wilbur Robinson





The Disney Elite:Meet the Robinsons was one of Disney’s early entries into CG animated features. While Pixar had already released such brilliant films as Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and The Incredibles, over at Disney there was just Dinosaur and Chicken Little. Was Meet the Robinsons always intended as a CG film, and were you at all nervous and/or hesitant about making it one?



Stephen Anderson: Boy, the memory is getting hazy but, as far as I can remember, MtR was always intended to be a CG feature. Yes, in fact I remember that while I was still on Brother Bear, the announcement was made that the studio was transitioning out of hand drawn. I was slightly anxious about doing CG just because it was something new I had to learn on top of already trying to learn how to be a good director. But to me, the creative stuff is always the biggest challenge and the thing that occupies my mind most of the time. Disney has the best people in the world so I’m always confident that the movie will look good, sound good, etc. And I was lucky to have such great artistic and technical leadership surrounding me. I trusted them to help me out if I was confused or uncertain about the technology. They all gave me a boot camp in computer animation at the beginning so I felt like I had a pretty good foundation starting out and I felt safe asking about anything I didn’t know.





The Disney Elite: Meet the Robinsons was the first of Disney’s CG films that made me think, “Now THIS is the perfect pairing of film and format!” The slick, shiny surfaces of the CG at that time really served to complement the futuristic, retro/moderne look of your film. Not only that, but while Pixar was aiming more and more for a photorealistic approach to their animation, your cartoon was, well, CARTOONY! And not just the backgrounds and characters, but also the animation itself. For a relatively early CG film, you got some gorgeously goofy character animation in there! If you wouldn’t mind, would you make a list of the films – animated or otherwise – that you used as inspiration for Meet the Robinsons?


Stephen Anderson: Well story-wise, we looked at the movie You Can’t Take It With You. It’s also about an eccentric family with quirky personalities and passions. Bill Joyce, the author/illustrator of the book that MtR is based on, told me that You Can’t Take It With You was a huge influence on him when he was creating the Robinson family. With our art director, Robh Ruppel, we talked a lot about The Wizard of Oz and how that movie goes from a sepia palette to a Technicolor palette and that influenced the look of the distant past (when we see Lewis’ mother giving him up it’s sepia) and the future (bright, bold and Technicolor). With the animators, we looked at scenes of Jim Carrey as inspiration for both Wilbur and Bowler Hat Guy. Also a lot of Looney Tunes. We used to say that Lewis is a Disney character and Wilbur and the Robinsons are Warner Looney Tunes characters. Lewis moves in more of a solid, natural, Disney-type of animation and the Robinsons are zippier and invade your personal space more like Looney Tunes characters. Those are some of the main influences I can think of.





The Disney Elite: Another wonderfully cartoony element of the film is your choice of voice-actors. The voice-work often reminds me more of 1960s Hanna-Barbera cartoons than anything Disney was doing at the time. I mean, there are some really unexpected picks in there (Batman’s Adam West, Roseanne’s Laurie Metcalf, There’s Something About Mary’s Harland Williams), all of whom do an AMAZING job. Oh, and then there’s YOU – voicing not one, not two, but THREE characters, including the mustache-twirling Bowler Hat Guy! Care to share the story behind that bit of kismet casting?


Stephen Anderson: Thank you for saying that about our voice actor choices. I’ve always been such a fan of those classic voice actors and I liked approaching our casting that way. We thought it best to not go with big names, but just solid character performers. To me, actors who have experience in theater, sketch comedy and improv are really best for animation because they know how to create strong and clear characters.


As far as my involvement goes, it’s pretty simple. I’m sure you know about the work-in-progress reels that we create, where we take our story boards and cut them to temp vocals, music and sound fx. Well, I did the temp voices for those characters and, after several screenings with my voice in there, folks just got used to it and eventually I became the voice of those characters. It was the same with other members of the team. Frankie the Frog, Uncle Gaston and Lewis’ coach, Lefty the butler, the t-rex that BHG unleashes - those were all voiced by members of the story crew.





The Disney Elite: Meet the Robinsons is one of those rare movies that makes me tear up every time I watch it. This is all the more rare seeing as how for most of the film, it’s funny, funny, FUNNY. It seems to me like this kind of emotional punch can only be created when a writer/director is willing to put their own emotions and experiences into their work. Was this true for you? And if so, would you mind sharing a bit of your personal story that effected the story being told in Meet the Robinsons?


Stephen Anderson: The adoption part of the story was not in Bill Joyce’s original book. That was something that two development executives and a writer had built in to the first draft of the script, long before I’d come on to the project. When the studio handed me that script, I couldn’t believe what I was reading. While my story differs from Lewis’, I still totally identified with his quest to know who his mother is and to find out why she gave him up. And the studio had no idea that I was adopted so it was a complete coincidence. Because I understood Lewis so well, I was able to bring out that emotional side much more. It was there in the original draft, but I felt we could strengthen it.


The theme of 'Keep Moving Forward’ evolved out of early discussions about adoption and my personal feelings about it. My parents were very open with me about it and told me I was adopted at a very early age. They used to tell me that when I became 18, I could access my records and find out who my birth parents were and that they would support me in that. So for many years, I looked towards that age as a big milestone and I was determined to find out where I came from. Then one day, I realized my 18th birthday had come and gone and I’d totally forgotten about starting this search. I’d gotten distracted by life, CalArts, starting a career, getting married, etc. And I was so lucky to have been adopted by such a loving family. What would finding my birth parents change? Nothing really. In fact, I’ve heard stories about people having very negative experiences reconnecting with birth parents and that sometimes it makes things worse for them. So the important thing was to not focus on the past but on the positive present and the promising future. And that helped us all realize that that’s exactly what Lewis is going through too.


The Disney Elite. Wow. I’m damned near speechless. That right there made my day, my week, my YEAR. That was incredibly moving and inspiring, Stephen. Thanks so much for sharing that.





Thursday: In Part 3 of our interview, Stephen Anderson tells us about his life at Disney post-Meet the Robinsons. There’s his work as director on Winnie the Pooh, his place in Disney’s famed ‘Story Trust’…oh, and his upcoming, TOP SECRET animated feature film project! He’ll also offer some GREAT advice for folks hoping to make art their life. If this sounds like YOU, make sure to come back and check it out. I hope you’ll join us!


All art via Stephen Anderson’s Instagram

NOTE: This interview would not have been possible without the kindness and assistance of tumblr user Morgan – a.k.a. that-guy-in-the-bowler-hat. Morgan runs the internet’s PREMIER Meet the Robinsons archive and fansite. If you are a fan of MtR, you MUST check out his tumblr a.s.a.p.!

10

Title: Bugs Bunny’s Adventures

Series: Whitman Story Hour Series 802

Characters: Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Petunia Pig, Cicero Pig, Three Bears, Big Bad Wolf

Creators: No Creators Listed

Year: 1948 Warner Bros Cartoons Inc

Publisher(s): Whitman Publishing Company, (Western Publishing)

Story:
1) Bugs Bunny’s Balloon Ride - 14 pages
2) Bug’s Bunny’s Headache - 6 pages 
3) Porky Meets The Three Bears - 12 pages 

Good/Bad: The art is awesome. The stories are great. This is a nice book.

A Pearl In The Rocks

Author: AvengeSuperWhoLock

Word Count: 2079

Pairing: LokixReader

Summary: Thor dumped Loki with the Avengers, believing it would help his little brother. It wasn’t long before the two of you became fast friends, and you ended up being the only person in Stark tower Loki would talk to.

Part 2 / Part 3 / Part 4 / Part 5 / Part 6

Keep reading

8

“This is a story from long ago, when the great mammoths still roamed our lands. It’s the story of my two brothers and me. When the three of us were young, we were taught that the world is full of magic. The source of this magic is the ever-changing lights that dance across the sky. The shaman woman of our village told us that these lights are the spirits of our ancestors, and that they had the power to make changes in our world. Small things become big. Winter turns to spring. One thing always changes into another. But the greatest change I ever saw was that of my brother. A boy who desperately wanted to be a man.”

ser·en·dip·i·tyˌ
/serənˈdipədē/
noun

  1. the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.“a fortunate stroke of serendipity”
    synonyms:(happy) chance, (happy) accident, fluke, good luck, good fortune, fortuity, providence; happy coincidence
    “the consequence of serendipity is sometimes a brilliant discovery”

Keep reading

First there was Lumberjack Cassian... Get ready for: Fisherman Azriel

_______________

• Think of how great he would be with knots and ropes. Elain finds out how talented in quite a pleasurable way.

• Elain, his lighthouse keeper. The light that guides him home.

• Azriel’s arms being faaaaantastic from working on the boat. You can see them through any sweater or shirt he wears.

• Not to mention the fact that sailors are famous for being tattooed. He has plenty. Elain has one, a small knot around the third finger of her left hand.

• When he’s away, Elain will send him messages in bottles. Hoping they’ll find their way to him.

• As he tows himself in, she’ll wait outside on a bench that Cassian had made for them as a wedding gift, making chains of daisies as she’s impatient to welcome him home. To kiss him, to help wash away the smell of the ocean, feed him dinner, then wrap her legs around him and show him just how much she missed him.

• Consider these lyrics for Elriel:

“I will live my life as a fisherman’s wife on an island in the blue bay
He will take care of me, he will smell like the sea
And close to my heart he’ll always stay

I will bear three girls all with strawberry curls, little Ella and Nelly and Faye
While I’m combing their hair, I will catch his warm stare
On our island in the blue bay”

• Azriel holding Elain in their hammock outside as they listen to the night time waves crashing on the rocks. Humming sea shanties as she falls asleep in his arms.

• On cold windy nights when the power shuts off, they huddle by the fire (with wood supplied by Cassian, of course) and he’ll tell her tales of the sea. Ghost stories, love stories. Azriel loves seeing Elain’s animated reactions, so he’ll go on for hours.

• During the summer, they’ll make a tent from bedsheets to camp in just outside their house. His latest catch cooking on the fire as she roasts marshmallows.

• Elain spends most of her days in the greenhouse that he and his brothers built for her.

• Every weekend they borrow Cassian’s truck to drive into town and take their goods to market. Though their fish and herbs and vegetables are top quality, it’s their charm and smiles that have them sold out by the afternoon.
- They spend the rest of the afternoon walking hand in hand, eating the onion bagel sandwiches (his favorite) that Elain had made from scratch, as well as dates and figs they purchased from other sellers.
- When the sun sets and the musicians come out to play, Azriel takes the bag from Elain’s arm and sets it on a nearby bench.
Extending his hand, which she takes, he spins her into a dance. They sway under the trees and streetlights as they both bask in how happy they are to have found each other.

• The Gardener and The Fisherman.
- “They loved with a love that was more than love in their kingdom by the sea…”