the staten islander

“Learning is a right. Reading brings you to new worlds,” said Octavia Loving, a 17-year-old student at Special Music High School, as she stood amid the stacks at Countee Cullen Library in Harlem, one of the neighborhoods with the highest concentration of children with blocked cards, according to library officials. “They shouldn’t block us from reading because of money.”

On Thursday, the city’s three library systems — the New York Public Library, which serves Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island; the Queens Library; and the Brooklyn Public Library — will forgive all fines for children 17 and under and unblock their cards. The one-time amnesty is being underwritten by the JPB Foundation, a philanthropy that supports civic causes, which will make up $2.25 million of the shortfall in revenue from the forgiven fines.

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kate mckinnon + live action film credits

My forever growing movie list of everything I love

• The Kings Of Summer
• Blue Valentine
• Big Fish
• Kick-Ass 1&2
• Scott Pilgrim Vs the World
• Youth In Revolt
• Palo Alto
• Adult World
• Two Night Stand
• The First Time
• The Theory Of Everything
• All The Wilderness
• Love, Rosie
• What If
•The royal Tenenbaums
• Moonrise kingdom
• The Darjeeling limited
• The life aquatic with steve zissou
• Rushmore
• Bottle rocket
•Happythankyoumoreplease
• Stuck in love
• Submarine
• The squid and the whale
• The kids are all right
• Up in the air
• Toast
• Grand Budapest hotel
• Greenburg
• The Spectacular Now
• Ruby Sparks
• Now is Good
• Little Miss Sunshine
• Inside Llewyn Davis
• The Art Of Getting By
• The Descendants
• It’s kind of a funny story
• (500) Days of summer
• Nowhere Boy
• Grand Budapest Hotel
• Art School Confidential
• Away We Go
• beginners
• Her
• Once
• Drive
• Elysium
• A place beyond the pines
• Let me in / let the right one in
• The aviator
• What’s eating Gilbert grape
• Seeking a friend for the end of the world
• Zombie land
• Adventureland
• Age of Adeline
• Mr.Nobody
• Staten Island Summer
• Yours Mine And Ours
• The Way Way Back

• Joy • Pan’s Labrynth
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           The Temple Of American Empire (New York Public Library)

The New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City. With nearly 53 million items, the New York Public Library is the second largest public library in the United States (behind the Library of Congress), and fourth largest in the world.[3] It is a private, non-governmental, independently managed, nonprofit corporation operating with both private and public financing.[4] The library has branches in the boroughs of Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island, and affiliations with academic and professional libraries in the metropolitan area of New York State. The City of New York’s other two boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, are served by the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Library, respectively. The branch libraries are open to the general public and consist of circulating libraries. The New York Public Library also has four research libraries which are open to the general public as well.

The library, officially chartered as The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations, was developed in the 19th century, founded from an amalgamation of grass-roots libraries, and social libraries of bibliophiles and the wealthy, aided by the philanthropy of the wealthiest Americans of their age.he New York Public Library (NYPL) is a public library system in New York City. With nearly 53 million items, the New York Public Library is the second largest public library in the United States (behind the Library of Congress), and fourth largest in the world.[3] It is a private, non-governmental, independently managed, nonprofit corporation operating with both private and public financing.[4] The library has branches in the boroughs of Manhattan, The Bronx, and Staten Island, and affiliations with academic and professional libraries in the metropolitan area of New York State. The City of New York’s other two boroughs, Brooklyn and Queens, are served by the Brooklyn Public Library and the Queens Library, respectively. The branch libraries are open to the general public and consist of circulating libraries. The New York Public Library also has four research libraries which are open to the general public as well.The library, officially chartered as The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations, was developed in the 19th century, founded from an amalgamation of grass-roots libraries, and social libraries of bibliophiles and the wealthy, aided by the philanthropy of the wealthiest Americans of their age.

theguardian.com
Staten Island Univ. Hospital policy allows doctors to to perform procedures without a pregnant woman’s consent
“It basically says, ‘If you don’t have time to [take these steps], you can just strap her down.’”
By Molly Redden

Part of a series about the outsize number of C-sections performed in the U.S. 

The Staten Island University hospital (SIUH) policy offers doctors step-by-step instructions for performing procedures and surgeries without a pregnant woman’s consent if they can’t persuade her to give permission and several doctors agree that the treatment carries a “reasonable possibility of significant benefit” for her fetus that “outweigh[s] the possible risks to the woman”.

When there is an emergency that threatens the fetus, the policy gives her doctor even more power, allowing him or her to override a pregnant woman’s wishes on the spot and without consulting anyone else.

Doctors are allowed – and even encouraged – to privilege their own authority and ‘the safety of the fetus’ above the patient’s bodily autonomy. It’s another chapter in the ongoing, overwhelming assessment of people who can get pregnant as lacking personhood and being merely vehicles for fetuses – but this time within the medical community, and thus also involving abuse of power.

  • “Every reasonable effort shall be made to respect the rights and wishes of the woman, but also to protect the welfare of the fetus.” 
  • “Because of the physiologic dependence of the fetus on the pregnant woman, the burden of consequences of her actions on the fetus should be taken into account by her doctors and staff.”
  • “In some circumstances, the significance of the potential benefits to the fetus of medically indicated treatment may justify using the means necessary to override a maternal refusal of the treatment.

Those circumstances are met if there is a risk of serious harm to the fetus without the treatment, the fetus is viable, the risks to the woman are “relatively small”, the benefits for the fetus “significantly outweigh” the potential risks to the woman, and the doctor has made “reasonable efforts to persuade the pregnant woman to change her mind”. 

[…] “If the Attending Physician judges that there is emergent need to treat the fetus, and reasonably determines that waiting for consultation … could pose significant additional risk to the fetus, the Attending Physician may choose to take the measures necessary to override the refusal and protect the medical welfare of the fetus without further delay.”

Read the whole article – it’s long but necessary. Warning for discussion of forced C-sections.

“One of the things that catches my eye about this hospital’s protocols is how nebulous they are, how loaded with opinion and moral judgment, how squishy-soft they are,” Bast said. “They’re written with all these sort-ofs and probablies and qualifiers and most-likelies. You can’t deprive somebody of their constitutional rights based on, ‘I think so, probably.’”