the spark of the rebellion

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Inmate #0801, [interrogation video]

Found in BL/ind archives, shows footage of 20-year-old Gerard Way, who would later turn into the infamous rebel leader known as Party Poison, interrogated after being taken into custody by S/C/A/R/E/C/R/O/W operatives for refusing to wear his BLI headphones at the appropriate times and levels. Way claimed that the daily broadcasts were “unnatural” as he continued to show disinterest and even laugh through the interrogation. Many experts say this is the event that sparked the rebellion that would make it’s mark on Battery City history.

America's Education System

You know what school teaches you? It doesn’t efficiently teach you how to get along with people, pay taxes, ace a job interview or even more importantly: be happy with yourself when others aren’t, know that you don’t need a significant other to be fulfilled, or that everyone is equal. You know what school teaches you? School teaches you to be a homework machine, to spit out worksheets and keep formulas in your head until the next test. It teaches you how to stay up late studying things you don’t even understand and sacrificing time with your family to put yet another number on your transcript. It teaches you to volunteer not because you care, but because colleges like people who volunteer. It teaches you to follow all their rules and then you get into the world and people wonder why everyone is the same, dull person.

When Professor McGonagall calls the name, “Black, Sirius,” a boy with dark hair and darker eyes emerges from the crowd of nervous first years. His back is straight, his head is high, but his eyes betray him–terror lurks behind his irises as the sorting hat is placed over his head and falls all the way over his nose.

The hat finds this boy’s mind to be full of the traditions and social niceties that come with a pureblood upbringing. There is a sense of arrogance, which sticks out, as though it has been implanted there–as though this boy has heard his family speak so highly of themselves for so long that he’s forced to believe it himself. But beyond that is a spark of rebellion, and the hat knows that if it were fed the right fuel, the fire that would ensue would be uncontrollable. The hat feels this boy’s own self-contempt; there is a deep aching to be free, so strong that it’s visceral. 

The hat sees a stubbornness of the likes he has rarely seen.

A small, timid voice asks, “are you going to put me in Slytherin?” The voice says Slytherin as though it’s a poison that freezes the insides. 

The hat only chuckles. It doesn’t say, “I didn’t even consider it.” Instead, it shouts to the Great Hall, “Gryffindor!” and watches as the dark haired boy walks to his new house table, with a look that is equal parts triumph, and fear.

“Lupin, Remus,” is a thin kid in robes that are a size too big. He has nervous ticks–he chews on his lower lip, and tugs at his sleeves; when he sits on the stool he can’t stop bouncing his legs. 

“What have we here?” says the hat once it falls over the boy’s head. “I’ve never sorted a werewolf before.”

It’s amazing how quickly the boy’s thoughts turn cold. There’s a moment of anxiety, until he reasons out that no one in the Great Hall can hear what the hat is saying to him, and that anxiety is quickly filled by anger.

“Go on then,” the boy says briskly in his head. “Sort me into Ravenclaw, since I know you’re going to. I know I’m smart and bookish. The boys I met on the train even said so, when they saw me reading a muggle book.” 

This boy is compassionate and mild-mannered usually, the hat sees, but his insides are burning. There’s a maturity that shouldn’t be there–as though every time his bones shift to make room for the monster, he ages along with them. The hat, feeling what this boy feels, notices dull pains in every corner of his body, where the wolf has scarred the skin, broken blood vessels, and cracked the joints. Along with the maturity there is a stoicism–this boy literally is always in pain, but he’d never say so; wouldn’t even hint.

“With an attitude like that?” the hat finally replies. “I think not.” And it feels the boy’s jolt of surprise when it belts out, “Gryffindor!”

“Pettigrew, Peter,” is a conundrum.

He is a mousy boy, with a lot of baby fat, and a slight tremble. But the hat can tell that there is much more to him than that.

There is an overwhelming sense of self-preservation, along with a tendency for hero-worship, and a need for acceptance. This is not a boy looking for power, however, this is a boy looking for survival. The hat contemplates Hufflepuff, but for all his passivity, this boy has an inkling of courage that the hat just can’t ignore. 

“Tell me,” the hat decides to ask. “Where do you think you belong?”

“I met nice boys on the train,” says the boy. “They’re both in Gryffindor now. I think I’d like to be in Gryffindor too.”

The hat ponders this for a good long moment, before conceding and yelling, “Gryffindor!” because after all, the greatest mark of courage is the courage to ask for what you want. 

The easiest sorting of the day comes from “Potter, James,” who struts up to the stool in a manner that looks somewhat ridiculous on an eleven year old.

The hat falls over the boy’s eyes and is hit by a rush of certainty; of expectation. The boy, not unlike Mr. Black, comes from a long line of purebloods, and there is a similar arrogance that lingers, but it’s less pronounced–it’s more natural. This is a boy that is sure of himself and his abilities, and also his moral convictions. The hat sees someone who stands for things strongly, and would die before seeing them taken. 

He had thought he had seen the worst case of stubbornness in Mr. Black, but this boy could give him a run for his money. What a force of nature, the hat thinks to itself, those two would become should they ever decide to work together.

It takes approximately ten seconds for the hat the shout out, “Gryffindor!” once again, and it watches the boy jump down with a self-satisfied smirk. 

The boy joins his house table, next to the other new additions, and they sit shoulder to shoulder, grinning at one another. 

This year’s Gryffindor first years, home at last.

“It was a rebellion, it was an uprising, it was a civil rights disobedience — it wasn’t no damn riot” -  Stormé DeLarverie

DeLarverie- A bi-racial, lesbian drag king performer whose activism and perseverance against the injustices imposed by police during the Stonewall Riots, was the person who arguably provided the first blow which sparked and defined the rebellion. Stormé was best known for being an essential core of the Jewel Box Revue, performing as one of the only male impersonators who truly renounced the constructions of gender imposed on women, and inspired many to challenge the pre-determined notions of their identities. In later years, operating as a singer, MC and bouncer for several lesbian bars among copious roles were those that truly reflected her protective nature. Often, DeLarverie was someone who sought out any bullying or intolerance occurring to the most vulnerable LGBT+ people, truly embracing those so heavily marginalized into a loving, unified community. Unquestionably, her actions during June, 27th, 1969 within Stonewall were pivotal and her responses to the homophobic slander and violent attacks of the police were actions that were truly progressive. Furthermore, it truly cements as her as a central core to the Stonewall Veterans Association and to the foundation which has allowed queer rights to flourish.

“She literally walked the streets of downtown Manhattan like a gay superhero; she was not to be messed with by any stretch of the imagination.” – Lisa Cannicati, owner of village lesbian bar, Henrietta Hudson.

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Agent Kallus in Star Wars Rebels: Spark of Rebellion

Okay, I’ve seen people wonder if Rose is a hypocrite for shattering Pink Diamond. But I have a very macabre theory.

Remember Steven’s body jumping ability? 

Steven completely possessed Lars and Lars sort of had his mind pushed away with Steven being the dominant mind, as if he belonged in Lars’ body no problem. Lars’s mind stayed in his body, dormant. With Steven piloting his every action.

Rose is very willing to make self sacrifice for a greater good, she had given up her physical form to make Steven, but what if this isn’t the first time she’s made a move as dangerous?


Maybe Pink Diamond body swapped into a willing Rose Quartz and killed her original Diamond body to spark the rebellion. 

The original Rose and Pink Diamond co-habited the Rose Quartz body and communicated internally.

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star wars rebels  spark of rebellion 

This is master Obi-Wan Kenobi. I regret to report that both our Jedi Order and the Republic have fallen, with the dark shadow of the Empire rising to take their place. This message is a warning and a reminder for any surviving Jedi: Trust in the Force. Do not return to the Temple, that time has passed. And our future is uncertain. We will each be challenged. Our trust, our faith, our friendships. But we must persevere. And in time, a new hope will emerge. May the Force be with you. Always.

Spark of Rebellion

@newtonartemiis

Amelia tied her hair back into a knot, and rolled up her sleeves. Her job was to mop the blood off the streets. She hated it. She would much rather join the rebellion with the other students. But the boys would merely laugh at her. Amy sighed.

anonymous asked:

I'm 99% sure that in the next EC episode, Glinda's seduction attempt is going to bomb. Lucas is going to reject her because he's still in love with Dorothy. If he weren't, she wouldn't be gunning for her death, especially at his hands. She wants Dorothy to suffer. I also think she isn't going to like how powerful Dorothy already is? Glinda believes her word is law, and Dorothy isn't going to obey her anytime soon, and that might spark rebellion among the other witches in her coven.

I mean that’s kind of been confirmed by spoilers and by the promo that’ll be the case. It’s what happens afterward that’s unclear.