the snow maiden

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Снегу́рочка (The Snow Maiden)

50 in x of animated feature film history
Release: 1952
Country: Soviet Union
Director: Ivan Ivanov-Vano, Aleksandra Snezhko-Blotskaya

“The Snow Maiden is based on the Slavic-pagan play of the same name by Aleksandr Ostrovsky (itself largely based on traditional folk tales). Music from Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera The Snow Maiden is used, arranged for the film by L. Shvarts.

Snegurochka––The Snow Maiden––is the daughter of Spring the Beauty (Весна-Красна) and Ded Moroz (Father Frost), and yearns for the companionship of mortal humans. She grows to like a shepherd named Lel, but her heart is unable to know love, not helped by the fact that Lel claims to love her one moment and abandons her the next. Her mother takes pity and gives her the ability to love, but as soon as she falls in love, her heart warms and she melts, happy to have known love.”

(source)

The Snow Maiden is available on YouTube with English subtitles.

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A bit of Soviet animation in the blog: this is Snegurochka from The Snow Maiden, 1952 (directed by I. Ivanov-Vano)

The Snow Maiden is based on the traditional Russian tale about a girl made of  snow, who tried to live among normal people. The tale ends unhappily: Snegurochka melts from warmth of a fire (or love, in different versions). 

anonymous asked:

Other then golems and homunculus, are there any other man made mythological creatures?

Every culture has some creature, being, or thing that people can/have made. Sometimes it requires a bit of divine intervention, sometimes a bit of magic, and sometimes it’s simply the way things are. Here are some of the ones we came up with:

  • Kodoku (worm poison): you seal several insects in a jar, letting them kill each other until only one is left. The fluid remains of the dead insects can be used as a poison, but the surviving insect can be kept to bring the creator wealth and good fortune. However, if the creator doesn’t feed the insect by sacrificing human lives, it will devour them. The only way to avoid this is to bury all the wealth (plus interest) earned from the worm.
  • Gu curse: you seal up lizards, snakes, spiders, insects, and other small nasty creatures in a jar. The creatures fight and devour each other until their poison is concentrated all into one survivor that takes the form of a golden silkworm. This silkworm brings gold to its creator in exchange for human lives. It also tends to its master’s home (much like a European brownie). It can not be killed by burning, drowning, or cutting it apart. The only way to be rid of it is to be devoured or to put it in a basket with gold and/or silver and set it out on the street to be picked up by a hapless person (who then has to care for it or be devoured)
  • Basilisk: you place a chicken egg under a toad and when it hatches, it’s a basilisk. (Some versions specify the type of chicken, egg, and/or toad)
  • Ikiryo: from the Tale of Genji (so not a great source for original myths)
  • Galatea: was a statue of a woman carved by Pygmalion. She was turned human when he prayed to Aphrodite
  • Snow Maiden: there are several stories that fall into this type, but it’s usually parents building a child out of snow who becomes real.

There are others, though these were all we were able to come up with. If any of our followers have any other suggestions, please let us know!

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animated gals - Snegurochka
Снегу́рочка (The Snow Maiden)

1952
Soviet Union
Ivan Ivanov-Vano, Aleksandra Snezhko-Blotskaya 

filed under: Soviet Union, 1950s, supernatural