the single blues

Jungle
Jamie N Commons & X Ambassadors
Jungle

Jungle byJamie N Commons & X Ambassadors (Jungle - Single)

I’m experimenting with illustrating tracks, ‘cause just mentioning it seems not enough nowadays. -> X

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happy birthday iggy

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On this day in music history: November 6, 1971 - “Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)” by Marvin Gaye hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 2 weeks, also peaking at #9 on the Hot 100 on the same date. Written by Marvin Gaye and James Nyx, it is the seventh chart topping single for the R&B music icon. Following the huge success of the single “What’s Going On” after its release in late January of 1971, Motown demands a full album to accompany it. Gaye quickly gets to work on the rest of the songs, writing both on his own and collaborating with close friends and associates around Motown including songwriter Al Cleveland, Four Tops member Renaldo “Obie” Benson, and even his wife Anna. Marvin also writes with songwriter James Nyx, who had originally had worked as a janitor and handy man at friend and former Moonglows band mate Harvey Fuqua’s Tri-Phi/Harvey record label in Detroit. Nyx eventually begin writing songs with Fuqua, then following him to Motown in 1963 when Tri-Phi and Harvey Records are absorbed by Motown. Nyx meets Marvin Gaye through Fuqua at this time and the trio begin writing together, though their material is shelved. Together, Gaye and Nyx write songs for The Originals (“Baby I’m For Real”, “The Bells”), including the single “We Can Make It Baby”. While working on songs for the “What’s Going On” album, the pair collaborate on three songs, “What’s Happening Brother?”, “God Is Love”, and “Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)”. While the title track expresses anguish over problems affecting the world at large, most prominently the war still raging in Vietnam (at that time), the latter of those songs mediates on issues even closer to home. “Inner City Blues” puts into clear focus, the often dire and bleak conditions in major inner cities in America that many of its citizens are living under. The track is recorded in March of 1971 at Motown’s Studio A in Detroit with members of The Funk Brothers including Bob Babbitt (bass), Eddie “Bongo” Brown (congas), Robert White, Joe Messina (guitars), and Chet Forest (drums). Issued as the third and final single from “What’s Going On” in September of 1971, it follows its predecessors to the top of the R&B singles chart, and into the top ten on the pop singles chart. “Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)” becomes one of Marvin Gaye’s most popular and often covered songs, with versions recorded by Grover Washington, Jr. (the title track of his debut album on Motown’s Kudu imprint in 1972), Gil Scott-Heron, Maceo Parker, and Sarah Vaughan. It is also sampled by numerous artists including The D.O.C., A Tribe Called Quest, MC Solaar, Spice 1, Scarface, Ice Cube, Too Poetic, K-Solo, Janet Jackson, Ralph Tresvant, and Angela Winbush.

anonymous asked:

The men not being able to hug women post. Not a complaint, a request. I need you to screenshot or something, excerpts from Drew Carey's book Dirty Jokes and Beer, chap 'Single Man Blues'. Written in 1997 and that was him complaining, in the wake of sexual harassment lawsuits at Warner Broathers studios (and the Tailhook scandal) how militant feminists were ruining America. And how he couldn't and wouldn't hug women any more. It really needs to be read, now espcially, by a wider audience. ty

This is so tragically ironic, my library of first edition Drew Carey books was just stolen by highwaymen while in transit to my vault. If only you had sent me this message two days ago!

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On this day in music history: March 22, 1965 - “Bringing It All Back Home”, the fifth album by Bob Dylan is released. Produced by Tom Wilson, it is recorded at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City from January 13-15, 1965. Recorded just four months after the release of his previous album “Another Side Of Bob Dylan”, the prolific musician shifts musical direction yet again. Moving away from the acoustic based protest songs that have established him as a leader of the folk music movement, Dylan cuts half of the new album with a band using electric guitars and bass for the first time. The very act of a folk musician using electric instruments is considered a highly controversial act, with many of his peers having a bias against rock & roll. Dylan’s lyrics also begin to change dramatically, becoming more personal and adopting an abstract “stream of consciousness” prose in many of them. This is most evident on the albums classic single “Subterranean Homesick Blues” (#39 Pop), drawing inspiration from disparate sources including beat poet Jack Kerouac, folk musicians Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger, and rock & roll pioneer Chuck Berry. The song becomes Bob Dylan’s first chart single in the US, and one of his best known compositions. The album contains a number of other classics including “Maggie’s Farm”, which Dylan performs to a hostile crowd at the Newport Folk Festival, jeering him for feeling that he has betrayed his core folk music audience by going electric. “Gates Of Eden”, “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” and “It’s Alright Ma (I’m Only Bleeding)” also become among Dylan’s best known, widely covered songs. Also on the second side of the album is his recording of “Mr. Tambourine Man”, originally cut during the “Another Side” sessions, but the first version is left unreleased. Bob re-records it again on the final day of recording for “Bringing It All Back Home on January 15, 1965. Only five days later, The Byrds record their electric version of "Mr. Tambourine Man” in Los Angeles with producer Terry Melcher. Their version hits number one on the pop singles chart late June of 1965. Once released, “Bringing It All Back Home” becomes Bob Dylan’s most successful release to date, topping the UK album chart and his first top ten album in the US. First released on CD in the late 80’s, it is remastered and reissued in 2003, as a hybrid SACD, featuring the original stereo mix, and a newly remixed 5.1 surround mix. Reissue label Sundazed Records reissues the original mono mix as a 180 gram vinyl LP in 2001, making it available for the first time since going out of print in the late 60’s. Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab also reissues the title as a double vinyl set, mastered at 45 RPM in 2012, followed by a hybrid SACD featuring only the stereo mix in 2013. “Bringing It All Back Home” peaks at number six on the Billboard Top 200, and is certified Platinum in the US by the RIAA.

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Take a listen to my newest single When I Die! If you like it please share it with a friend, I’d really appreciate it! 🖤
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#songwriter #singersongwriter #wrenfione #newmusic #single #recordingartist #whenidie #newsong #original #folk #blues #pop #rock #follow #share #lighthousemusic #ctmstudios #nashville #tennessee #musiccity #nashvillesongwriter #upandcoming #newartist (at Nashville, Tennessee)

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