the short stories of ernest hemingway

To be able to say: I loved this person, we had a hell of a nice time together, it’s over but in a way it will never be over and I do know that I for sure loved this person, to be able to say that and mean it, that’s rare…That’s rare and valuable.
—  Ernest Hemingway, The Complete Short Stories 
To be able to say: I loved this person, we had a hell of a nice time together, it’s over but in a way it will never be over and I do know that I for sure loved this person, to be able to say that and mean it, that’s rare…That’s rare and valuable.
—  Ernest Hemingway, The Complete Short Stories
To be able to say: I loved this person, we had a hell of a nice time together, it’s over but in a way it will never be over and I do know that I for sure loved this person, to be able to say that and mean it, that’s rare…That’s rare and valuable.
—  Ernest Hemingway, The Complete Short Stories
To be able to say: I loved this person, we had a hell of a nice time together, it’s over but in a way it will never be over and I do know that I for sure loved this person, to be able to say that and mean it, that’s rare, señor. That’s rare and valuable.
—  Ernest Hemingway, The Complete Short Stories
She saw him the first day on board, and then her heart sank into her shoes as she realized at last how much she wanted him. No matter what his past was, no matter what he had done. Which was not to say that she would ever let him know, but only that he moved her chemically more than anyone she had ever met, that all other men seemed pale beside him.
—  F. Scott Fitzgerald (A New Leaf, 1931)
6 Words

While lunching with friends at a restaurant, Hemingway bets the table ten dollars each that he can craft an entire story in six words. After the pot is assembled, Hemingway writes “For sale: baby shoes, never worn” on a napkin, passes this around the table, and this is what happens:

“So,” said Hemingway, beaming confidence. “I think I’ll be taking that money.”

“I don’t get it,” said one of Hemingway’s friends.

“Me neither,” said another.

“Why didn’t the baby wear the shoes?” asked another friend. “Is the baby stupid?”

“This a stupid baby story, Ernest?”

“That’s not much of a story. I don’t think it deserves my ten bucks.”

“You ruined my good napkin for this?”

“I can write a stupid baby story in 6 words easy. For sale: stupid baby, extra stupid. See!”

“Damn, that’s good.”

“Ya, give him the money. Sorry, Hemingway.”

“Pay me back for that napkin you ruined.”

“Yeah, you suck, Hemingway.”

“Kill yourself, Ernest!”

“With a gun!”

“Yeah!”

“If I saw you for the first time everything would turn over inside of me and I’d ache right through my chest.”
“That’s the way I feel all of the time.”
“You can’t feel that way all of the time.”
“Maybe not. But I can feel that way an awfully big part of the time.”

Ernest Hemingway, from “The Strange Country,” The Complete Short Stories Of Ernest Hemingway (Scribner, 2007)