the sabbath of witches

Good morning, dearest freaky darlings.


💐🍃🌼Happy and blessed Litha/Summer Solstice to my friends and followers in the Northern Hemisphere!🍃🌼🍃💐


❄⛄Happy and blessed Yule to my friends and followers in the Southern Hemisphere!⛄❄

Master Post for Beginner Witches

Remember that you don’t have to do anything you aren’t comfortable with, and this list isn’t a requirement for witchcraft, just suggestions. Don’t let ANYONE invalidate you as a witch. Whether you have been doing this for 5 mins or 50 years, you are still a witch. Special love, energy, and snaps sent to all the people responsible for these amazing posts: ♥

Basic Information/Anthology etc.

Good things to research when you don’t know where to research (START HERE)

Types of Witches & Witchcraft

The Boring but IMPORTANT Basics of Witchcraft

Beginner Witchcraft

Crystals to Have on Your Altar (Altars aren’t required but if you do use one, this may be helpful)

Familiars (The Who What Hows)

The Goddess and the God (If following a Wicca Path, and just remember you need to find the path just for you. No one else can tell you how/who to worship)


Spell/Ritual Work

Ways to Cleanse

Magick of the Moon Phases (Familiarize yourself with this, many witches use the phases of the moon for spells, rituals, etc)

Spirit Work for beginners 

Crystal Cleansing (Important if you are going to work with crystals)

Salt & Witchcraft (You know witches love their salt)

Spell Writing Tips for Beginners

Divination Tips for Beginners

Spell Loopholes (A Must Read)

Reading a Candle

Color Magick (Lots of great ideas on how to include color witchcraft in your daily routine)

Simple beginner Spells 

50 simple Charms


Stock Up & Set Up! (Materials, meanings, etc.)

Basic Herbs List

Magical Correspondence and foods

Cleansing and Charging Items

Some Crystals for Beginners

Crystals/Stones Grouped by Use

Witchcraft Basics plants

the signs as real witches
  • Aries: Agnes Waterhouse// Had a deal with the Devil and wasn't afraid to say so. The Brave witch.
  • Taurus: Joan Wytte// Clairvoyant and healer who eventually became possessed by the Devil, getting involved in many fights.
  • Gemini: Marie Laveau// Voodoo Queen. Performed necromancy, mind control, telekinesis and pinning.
  • Cancer: Chedipe// Witch-vampire who rode on tigers in the moonlight, choosing houses to visit to cast spells on men.
  • Leo: Agnes Sampson// Tried to sink the ship of Queen Anne, wife of King James VI of England.
  • Virgo: Isobel Gowdie// Could control the weather and would often write poetry about witch practices. Allegedly marked by the Devil.
  • Libra: Circe// Transformed random sailors into wolves and lions and all kinds of animals.
  • Scorpio: Mother Shipton// Clairvoyant, sorceress. An outcast with a great talent.
  • Sagittarius: Maret Jonsdotter// Frequently tricked men. Attended witch sabbaths.
  • Capricorn: Alice Kyteler// Poisoned her rich husbands, disappeared the night before her execution.
  • Aquarius: Angele de la Barthe// Allegedly had sex with the Devil.
  • Pisces: Catherine La Voisin// Fortune Teller & Love Potions expert. Plotted to murder Louis XIV.

anonymous asked:

hello! i've been trying to research magic, but unfortunately most books i find are specific wicca, which i'm not interested in. do you have any book reccomendations that arent wicca centric? thank you! i love your blog :^)

Oh heckin yes I do My amazon wishlist is literally like six pages long… ALL BOOKS

WARNING: This Is Going To Be Extremely Long!

First though I want to note that while I 100% understand your feelings about the Wicca stuff (being a very NOT Wiccan Witch), not all books that are Wicca leaning are bad! I’ve gotten loads of useful information from books that tended to be a little new agey. That’s where being objective comes in! With ANY book, you should take it with a grain of salt, and some with a whole shaker. But it’s up to you to pay attention to misinformation and conflation, and to know how to do research to prove or disprove that something in a book you read is true or not. Does that make sense?? 

Anywho, a couple of books that are still kind of “Wicca-y” but great:

Those are all books from my personal collection that I would recommend! Now as for the Non-Wicca Books, Let’s dive in! Not all of these have I read or owned, and they are in no particular order. You’ll notice most of them relate to “Traditional Witchcraft” or West Country, because that is where my practice is focused. 

PHEW!

That was a lot! Okay anon I hope this gives you a good starting place! 

constantly-disheveled.tumblr.com/ask

Blessed Ostara

So what is Ostara? 

Ostara is a celebration of the Spring Equinox (March 21) celebrated by many practicing Wiccans, Pagans, and Witches. It marks the day when night and day are equal and balanced. The Sun God’s strength increases and the Goddess celebrates her fertility. Together they bring us Spring.

Ostara is a time for the celebration of fertility and balance, But fertility can be many things. It can be a new beginning hope, Or a fresh start. A goodbye to the harsh cold Winter, And a hello to the change Spring brings us. 

Eggs are commonly used for symbolism on this day as they have always been a symbol for fertility and life.

Ostara is very similar to the Christian holiday, Easter where followers celebrate the resurrection of Jesus. Both are celebrating life. 

Eggs are commonly used for symbolism on this day as they have always been a symbol for fertility and life. 




 So what can you do to invite this change and fertility into your life?

Take some egg shells, And hollow them out The idea is to make little “Pots”. Once that is done, Hold them, And think of what you need in your life. A new love? Peace? Healing? What ever it may be write your wishes for the Year on your shells and use them as planters for seeds. Water them, Take care of them and know that as your seedlings grow, They are pulling nourishment from the shells. They are being infused with your own intention. They’re bringing your spell to life.

Once they outgrow there little homes, Plant them outdoors so that they can be a reminder of what Spring brings to you.

Yule - Winter Solstice

Originally posted by arcanesage

Yule is also a celebration of the birth of the Sun King and nature’s renewal. We practice sympathetic magick by lighting fires or candles to encourage the sun to grow stronger.  

This is a time of new beginnings both physically and spiritually, the wheel of the year has made a complete circle. The darkest night of winter is a good time for self-examination and discovering the “seeds” of  spiritual growth or hindrance which are lying dormant within us. 

The Winter Solstice is the turning point in the natural cycle of the year, this darkest night in all the year is followed by a day that will dawn just a little earlier!

So, what exactly is Yule?

Yule takes place on the day of the winter solstice, around December 21 in the northern hemisphere (below the equator, the winter solstice falls around June 21). On that day (or close to it), an amazing thing happens in the sky. The earth’s axis tilts away from the sun in the Northern Hemisphere, and the sun reaches its greatest distance from the equatorial plane.

Many cultures have winter festivals that are in fact celebrations of light.

In addition to Christmas, there’s Hanukkah with its brightly lit menorahs, Kwanzaa candles, and any number of other holidays.  As a festival of the Sun, the most important part of any Yule celebration is light – candles, bonfires, and more.

While it may be mostly Pagans who celebrate the Yule holiday today, nearly all cultures and faiths have held some sort of winter solstice celebration or festival. Because of the theme of endless birth, life, death, and rebirth, the time of the solstice is often associated with deity and other legendary figures. No matter which path you follow, chances are good that one of your gods or goddesses has a winter solstice connection.

  • Alcyone (Greek): Alcyone is the Kingfisher goddess. She nests every winter for two weeks, and while she does, the wild seas become calm and peaceful.
  • Ameratasu (Japan): In feudal Japan, worshipers celebrated the return of Ameratasu, the sun goddess, who slept in a cold, remote cave. When the the other gods woke her with a loud celebration, she looked out of the cave and saw an image of herself in a mirror. The other gods convinced her to emerge from her seclusion and return sunlight to the universe.
  • Baldur (Norse): Baldur is associated with the legend of the mistletoe. His mother, Frigga, honored Baldur and asked all of nature to promise not to harm him. Unfortunately, in her haste, Frigga overlooked the mistletoe plant, so Loki - the resident trickster - took advantage of the opportunity and fooled Baldur’s blind twin, Hodr, into killing him with a spear made of mistletoe. Baldur was later restored to life.
  • Bona Dea (Roman): This fertility goddess was worshiped in a secret temple on the Aventine hill in Rome, and only women were permitted to attend her rites. Her annual festival was held early in December.
  • Cailleach Bheur (Celtic): In Scotland, she is also called Beira, the Queen of Winter. She is the hag aspect of the Triple Goddess, and rules the dark days between Samhain and Beltaine.
  • Demeter (Greek): Through her daughter, Persephone, Demeter is linked strongly to the changing of the seasons and is often connected to the image of the Dark Mother in winter. When Persephone was abducted by Hades, Demeter’s grief caused the earth to die for six months, until her daughter’s return.
  • Dionysus (Greek): A festival called Brumalia was held every December in honor of Dionysus and his fermented grape wine. The event proved so popular that the Romans adopted it as well in their celebrations of Bacchus.
  • Frau Holle (Norse): Frau Holle appears in many different forms in Scandinavian mythology and legend. She is associated with both the evergreen plants of the Yule season, and with snowfall, which is said to be Frau Holle shaking out her feathery mattresses.
  • Frigga (Norse): Frigga honored her son, Baldur, by asking all of nature not to harm him, but in her haste overlooked the mistletoe plant. Loki fooled Baldur’s blind twin, Hodr, into killing him with a spear made of mistletoe but Odin later restored him to life. As thanks, Frigga declared that mistletoe must be regarded as a plant of love, rather than death.
  • Hodr (Norse): Hodr, sometimes called Hod, was the twin brother of Baldur, and the Norse god of darkness and winter. He also happened to be blind, and appears a few times in the Norse Skaldic poetry. When he kills his brother, Hodr sets in motion the string of events leading to Ragnarok, the end of the world.
  • Holly King (British/Celtic): The Holly King is a figure found in British tales and folklore. He is similar to the Green Man, the archetype of the forest. In modern Pagan religion, the Holly King battles the Oak King for supremacy throughout the year. At the winter solstice, the Holly King is defeated.
  • Horus (Egyptian): Horus was one of the solar deities of the ancient Egyptians. He rose and set every day, and is often associated with Nut, the sky god. Horus later became connected with another sun god, Ra.
  • La Befana (Italian): This character from Italian folklore is similar to St. Nicholas, in that she flies around delivering candy to well-behaved children in early January. She is depicted as an old woman on a broomstick, wearing a black shawl.
  • Lord of Misrule (British): The custom of appointing a Lord of Misrule to preside over winter holiday festivities actually has its roots in antiquity, during the Roman week of Saturnalia.
  • Mithras (Roman): Mithras was celebrated as part of a mystery religion in ancient Rome. He was a god of the sun, who was born around the time of the winter solstice and then experienced a resurrection around the spring equinox.
  • Odin (Norse): In some legends, Odin bestowed gifts at Yuletide upon his people, riding a magical flying horse across the sky. This legend may have combined with that of St. Nicholas to create the modern Santa Claus.
  • Saturn (Roman): Every December, the Romans threw a week-long celebration of debauchery and fun, called Saturnalia in honor of their agricultural god, Saturn. Roles were reversed, and slaves became the masters, at least temporarily. This is where the tradition of the Lord of Misrule originated.
  • Spider Woman (Hopi): Soyal is the Hopi festival of the winter solstice. It honors the Spider Woman and the Hawk Maiden, and celebrates the sun’s victory over winter’s darkness.

Four thousand years ago, the Ancient Egyptians took the time to celebrate the daily rebirth of Ra, the god of the Sun.

As their culture flourished and spread throughout Mesopotamia, other civilizations decided to get in on the sun-welcoming action. They found that things went really well… until the weather got cooler, and crops began to die. Each year, this cycle of birth, death, and rebirth took place, and they began to realize that every year after a period of cold and darkness, the Sun did indeed return.

In some traditions of Wicca and Paganism, the Yule celebration comes from the Celtic legend of the battle between the young Oak King and the Holly King. The Oak King, representing the light of the new year, tries each year to usurp the old Holly King, who is the symbol of darkness. Re-enactment of the battle is popular in some Wiccan rituals.

What are your thoughts on Yule? How will you celebrate? Reblog and share your thoughts!

☽ All-Things-Witchcraft ☾

🔮💫💀✨👻✨👁✨👻✨💀💫🔮

This is a spell to increase spiritual awareness. I figured it’s fitting since it’s October and almost Samhain!💫

✨ Likes/Loves charge it. ✨ Reblogs cast it. ✨

The witches’ Sabbath is fundamentally a communication with the dead; but it is not necessarily and not merely a “journey into the realms of the dead,” if this refers to the shamanistic migration of the soul in a narrow interpretation of shamanism. The main evidence of the connection between the presumed shamanism and witchcraft are examples of the female type of sorceresses; consequently the “journey” of the witch to the Sabbath and her carrying the living there is more likely to be seen as an act of possession. Undoubtedly related to the field of possession is the most frequent “popular” form of witches’ Sabbath in Central Europe—the feast of witches, which often takes the form of a fairy feast, though both versions bear the characteristics of the most archaic type of possession, the possession by the dead.
—  Éva Pócs, Witchcraft Mythologies and Persecutions