the roots the seed

anonymous asked:

was Peter, in your opinion, confident before the spider bite, or did that come as a result of his powers? did he always view himself as the only authority?

Okay, my answer to this is a third yes, a third no, and a third oh my god why haven’t I finished my Homecoming criticism post yet, for a lot different reasons. A big part of answering this ask is that I don’t know who Peter Parker is without Spider-Man. That’s a big part of why I have a tendency to keep him as Spider-Man in AUs when, for instance, I have frequently written Johnny without powers. Johnny without powers has, with some minor shifts, the potential to be the same person. I don’t think I can say that about Peter when so much of who he is as an adult is rooted in Spider-Man.

So I think, ultimately, yes, there was a seed of that in him, at the core of his character, however covered up by his life at the time it was. There’s a comic where The Spider tells Peter why he was bitten, which I know people have mixed feelings about because that takes it from a Random Accident into a more metaphysical “chosen hero” deal (I’m neutral on the concept myself, but whatever, I like this scene) that lays it out nicely:

“Why you? Because you were a hunter without teeth. You were chosen for your rage.” (Straczynski was really into the Peter as a predatory animal metaphor, which, y’know, I’m here for it.) Now anger =/= confidence, but by labeling Peter as a hunter, it frames him as someone who would take on that responsibility for himself, and would view himself as, for lack of a better term, the top of the food chain.

But before the bite, he didn’t have the physical ability to act on that instinct, and for a multitude of reasons (not the least the inherently Jewish concept of intelligence being a superpower, and that intelligence is something that Peter possesses by himself, no radioactive interference needed) I don’t think he would have explored that avenue on his own by, say, taking up boxing. (What would Aunt May think?) So I guess my thoughts on this are that those traits were in him all along, but the spider bite unlocked them, and that without they wouldn’t have surfaced. (Furthermore, without the death of Ben Parker, I don’t think they ever would have been used for such noble purposes.) The bite frees him to become that. Without it, they might never have manifested, or have manifested in negative ways. (High school Peter could have muttered LESS about how someday they’d all see, I’m just saying.)

Which is why I hate the emphasis that was placed on the suit in the MCU, but that’s part of a 2k post about twenty other things as well sitting open with my docs.

Pleasure turns to the pain
Of the lessons learned from the strain
Of the questions burned in my brain about whether love is humane in its touch
These thoughts are like salmon swimming upstream in the tears of your deceit
Fighting a current hurt that kills more than is created by the chaos of our intertwined emotions
Chaotic because the anchor of Eros’ arrow has been plucked from the vessel of my undying infatuation
Separation not as simple as the distance between us
My mind no longer possessed by the demons that had been the overseers of my enslavement to your lies
The seeds of these lies rooted so deeply they’ve cracked the foundation of what we once shared
Allowing the faith in us I had sealed inside to gush out like a river
Ripping the image of our future together from my thoughts as violently and as brutally as if it were a child being taken from its mother’s arms
I’m left surrounded in darkness, but I refuse to be swallowed by it
My loneliness like the night air; invisible to the eye, obvious to the touch, in its cold uncomfortableness
Yet If I could do all over again
I’d do it in the same skin I’m in
To lay down and let love die, just stay down and let love lie
No, no, no, no, not I
I’d rather stay ‘round and let love fly
Even though I’ve seen its darkest form; deceit
Nothing else could taste this warm or feel this sweet
— 

Love’s Deceit

Big Rube

💀 Curse Correspondences 💀

Crystals:

  • Agate - for use on a target who has entered a space uninvited, i.e. someone breaking into your home or vehicle
  • Alexandrite - causes obsession and delusions
  • Amethyst - causes sensitivity and self-destruction
  • Astrophyllite - causes those who have died at the hands of another to torment the target from the grave
  • Diamond - causes blindness, confusion, and disorientation
  • Diopside - lowers inhibitions and causes secrets to be revealed
  • Emerald - causes greed, selfishness, and isolation
  • Flint - causes conflicts
  • Garnet - leeches energy from a target
  • Kunzite - induces vulnerability 
  • Kyanite - used to infiltrate a target’s mind
  • Meteorite - used as a catalyst in baneful magick
  • Obsidian - used for general aggressive magick
  • Onyx - causes nightmares and mental torment, and is used to break up relationships
  • Opal - used to store negative energy, and then to be given to a target
  • Ruby - used to focus your intent on a target

Colors:

  • Black - law, justice, manifestation, sorrow
  • Red - force, energy, confrontation, jealousy, anger
  • Greenish Yellow - strife, discord, illness, conflict, jealousy, greed
  • Magenta - catalyst

Herbs:

  • Ague Weed - confusion 
  • Angelica Root - misery, strife, distress, discord
  • Asafoetida - drives enemies away
  • Bayberry - depression
  • Bindweed - binding
  • Blackberry Root - distress
  • Black Salt - misery, strife, distress, discord
  • Bladderwrack - illness
  • Bloodroot - substitute for blood
  • Blueberry - confusion, strife
  • Boneset - distress, confusion
  • Cayenne Pepper - anxiety
  • Chicory - discord
  • Chili Powder - discord, misery, strife
  • Cinquefoil - discomfort
  • Clove - stopping gossip
  • Cramp Bark - pain, illness
  • Dogbane - deception
  • Dragon’s Blood - destruction, strife, misery
  • Hemlock - discord, sadness
  • Henbane - illness, discord, melancholy
  • Jezebel Root - wickedness, ending relationships, punishing unfaithful lovers
  • Knot Weed - binding
  • Lemon - sourness, bitterness
  • Lemon Verbena - a boost of power, ending relationships
  • Lime - sourness, bitterness
  • Lobelia - discord
  • Mace - misery, strife
  • Mandrake - misery, strife
  • Mistletoe - isolation, confusion
  • Mullein - spirit work, nightmares
  • Mustard Seed - strife, discord
  • Myrrh - a boost of power
  • Nightshade (Belladonna) - discord, illness
  • Onion - strife
  • Patchouli - illness
  • Poke Root - confusion, discord
  • Poppy Seed - discord
  • Rue - misery
  • Safflower - destruction
  • Spanish Moss - bad luck
  • Slippery Elm - ending relationships
  • Stinging Nettle - jealousy, envy, discomfort
  • Sumac - bad luck
  • Tobacco - a substitute for any baneful herb
  • Tormentil - distress, harm, discord
  • Vetiver - silence
  • Wormwood (Absinthe) - misery, strife
  • Yew - spirit work
  • Yohimbe Bark - impotency

Planets:

  • Mars - power, force, energy, war, conflict, jealousy
  • Saturn - law, justice, chaos, revenge
  • Neptune - confusion, illusion, chaos
  • Pluto - death, mystery, crisis

Lunar Phases:

  • Waning - binding
  • Dark - destruction, banishing, justice
  • Black - power, manifestation

Taglocks:

  • DNA (saliva, nail clippings, hair, blood, etc.)
  • Drawings
  • Photos
  • The target’s name written on paper
  • The target’s signature
  • An item that belongs to the target

Other Ingredients:

  • Cigarette butts
  • Broken glass
  • Razorblades 
  • Vinegar
  • Lemon/lime juice
  • Alcohol
  • Bones
  • Needles
  • Nails
  • Thorns
  • Blood
  • Urine
  • Saliva
  • Shark teeth
  • Catfish spines
  • Murex seashells
  • Flying Devil Oil
  • Dead insects
  • Black sand
  • Charcoal

Disclaimer: I do not condone the unethical practice of collecting or harvesting animal parts, or forcefully obtaining certain biological taglocks. These are just ideas, and I am not responsible for anything you choose to do with them. 

Updated: 3-9-2017

Teas for Witches: the Basics

I can talk about tea literally all day (and I have because I’ve worked in a spice and tea shop for years), and there is SO much to talk about with both health and magical benefits. Teas are made from tea leaves called camellia sinensis, with the exception of herbal teas/infusions. For this, I’m going to list magical and health benefits by type of tea.

Black Tea

Feminine * Earth * Winter * Strength * Stability * Death * Expelling Negativity * Alertness * Energy

Black tea is the most fermented and oxidized of all teas. Its tea leaves look shriveled and black. It combats heart ailments, digestive problems, high cholesterol, asthma, and breast/menstrual problems. Black tea also has a lot of caffeine (47 mg, still less than coffee) and too much of it can cause acidity issues in the stomach.  

Examples: English/Irish Breakfast Tea, Assam, Darjeeling, Lapsung Souchang, Ceylon, Earl Grey

**There is a subset of black tea called Pu-erh, a post-fermented black tea. Some consider this to be the “purest” of all teas and connect it to the aether, as it is rare and valuable.

Green Tea

Masculine * Fire * Summer * Passion * Healing * Conscious Mind * Sexual Health * Love * Energy * Progress * Magic

Green tea is slightly steamed but not fermented, which maintains its green color. It has many health benefits, such as detoxifying, reducing cholesterol and weight, boosting immunity and stamina, and reducing blood glucose. It has less caffeine than black, but still some. 

Examples: Jasmine, Sencha, Matcha, Gyokurocha, Genmaicha, Hojicha, Gunpowder, Dragonwell

Oolong Tea

Feminine * Water * Autumn * Reflection * Meditation * Wisdom * Serenity * Concentration * Romance * Friendship

I always describe Oolong as being between Green and Blacks, since it is half fermented. It can help manage weight and stress, balance blog sugar levels, remove free radicals, and promote healthy skin and bones. HOWEVER, too much can actually speed up bone degradation because it sweeps away excess calcium. And beware of its high caffeine content (I used to drink Raspberry Wulong to pull all-nighters).

Examples: Milk Oolong, Formosa, Wulongs

White Tea

Masculine * Air * Spring * Happiness * Wisdom * Moon * Purification * Protection * Clarity * Cleansing * Beginnings

White tea is a little harder to find. Either the tea leaves are plucked as immature leaves and steamed, or the leaves have not been processed (there seems to be little consensus across cultures). Some have a small amount of caffeine. It’s a great antibacterial and antioxidant, and it improves the heart, oral health, and skin. Drinking a couple cups works better than one, and you can reuse the tea leaves, granted that the second cup will brew longer.

Examples: White teas come in many flavors and are usually labeled as white tea. You may need to seek out a tea shop to find some.

Herbal Tea

Magical properties depend on which herbs are used

This tea seems to be the most popular for witches on tumblr, because it is composed of dry, unprocessed herbs, seeds, fruits, or roots, and has no caffeine (as long as the herb doesn’t!). There are many recipes online as herbals are easy to make. In general, herbal tea promotes calm, reduces cholesterol and risk of heart conditions, cancers, and diabetes. Due to its lack of actual tea leaves it has less antioxidants than other teas. Some don’t even call it a tea, but dub it Herbal Infusion.

Examples: Rooibos, most Chais, Ginseng, Chamomile, Peppermint, Spearmint, Hibiscus

**Yerba Mate is an herbal tea that is notorious for its high caffeine levels (you’ve probably seen the energy drink). It also zaps one’s appetite and can become addictive, so be careful around this tea!

As always, feel free to add/message me of any corrections, and I hope you find your cup of tea!

Magickal Folk Names for Herbs

Having knowledge of herbs and plants (either magically or medicinally) during the Middle Ages, often was reason enough to accuse a woman of being a “witch,” so there is no doubt some of the country folk at the time took these herbal folk names literal.  Chances are, these names were used merely as descriptors to help remember them easier.  Most plants were given names descriptive of their uses and others were given names for something they generally resembled. Spells written by witches in ancient times were often written with such descriptors, which personally i believe to be a form of secret coding.

Here is a small list of “witchy” herb names (most of these are already floating around the community) that you can use in your craft when you create your spells.  This list could be a great addition to any Grimoire and i hope you find them as useful as i do.

Enjoy ~~~  Cannawitch

Plants

Aaron’s Rod - Goldenrod or mullein stalk
Absinthe - Wormwood
Adder’s Fork - Adder’s Tongue Fern or Bistort
Adder’s Tongue - Dog’s Tooth Violet (or Adder’s Tongue Fern
Ague root - Unicorn root
Alison - Sweet Alyssum
Angel Food, Archangel - Angelica
Angel’s Trumpet - Datura
Ass’s Ear - colt’s foot or comfrey
Ass’s Foot, Bull’s Foot - colt’s foot
Auld Man’s Bells, Old man’s bells - wood hyacinth, Hyacinthoides hispanica

Bad Man’s/Devil’s Oatmeal/Porridge - hemlock
Bad Man’s/Devil’s Plaything - Yarrow
Bastard - false Dittany
Bat flower - tacca
Bat’s Wing - Holly leaf
Bat’s Wool - moss (which moss?)
Bear’s Foot - Lady’s Mantle
Bear’s Grape Bearberry Arctostaphylos uva-ursi
Bear Paw - ramsons Allium ursinum or the root of male fern Dryopteris Felix-mas
Bear weed - Yerba Santa Eriodictyon californicum
Beard of a Monk - Chicory
Beggar’s Lice - Hound’s tongue
Beggar’s Buttons - Burdock
Bird’s Eye - Speedwell Veronica officinalis
Bird’s Foot - Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum (Also bird’s foot violet and bird’s foot trefoil)
Bird’s Nest - carrot, Indian pipe
Bishop’s Wort, Bishop’s Elder - Wood betony Stachys betonica
Bitter Grass - Ague Root Aletris Farinosa
Black Sampson - Echinacea
Blazing Star - liatris
Blind Eyes - Poppy
Blood from a head - Lupine *
Blood from a shoulder - Bear’s breech *
Blood of a Goose - Sap from a mulberry * Morus nigra
Blood of an Eye - Tamarisk gall * (probably the tannin extracted from)
Blood of Ares - purslane *
Blood of Hephaestus - wormwood *
Blood of Hestia - Chamomile *
Blood - sap of the elder or bloodwort
Bloody butcher - Valerian
Bloody Fingers - Foxglove
Blue Bottle - Bachelor’s buttons
Boy’s Love, Lad’s Love: Southernwood
Brain Thief - Mandrake
Bone of an Ibis - buckthorn * I am not sure if this is Rhamnus cathartica or sea buckthorn Hippophae spp If I can find a recipe containing this, I will know for sure by comparing its purpose to their very different qualities
Bread and Cheese - Hawthorn
Bride of the Meadow - meadowsweet
Bull’s Blood - beet or horehound
Burning bush - false dittany, also a modern name for species of Euonymus
Cow’s Horn - Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum
Bride of the Sun - calendula
Brown Dragon - wake robin
Buttons - tansy

Calf’s snout - Snapdragon
Candlemas Maiden - snowdrop
Candlewick - mullein, the flower stalk
Capon’s Tail - valerian
Carpenter’s Herb - bugleweed Lycopus europaeus
Carpenter’s Square - knotted figwort
Carpenter’s weed - Yarrow
Cat - catnip
Cat’s foot - white balsam, black cohosh, ground ivy
Cat’s herb - valerian
Chameleon star - bromeliad
Cheeses - marsh mallow
Chocolate flower - wild geranium (I don’t buy it)
Christ’s eye - wild clary Salvia verbenaca
Christ’s ladder - centaury
Christ’s spear - adder’s tongue fern Ophioglossum vulgatum
Church steeple - Agrimony
Clear eye - clary sage
Cleavers - bedstraw
Click - goosegrass
Clot - great mullien
Cocklebur - Agrimony
Cock’s comb - amaranth
Colt’s Tail - fleabane
Crane’s bill - wild geranium
Crow’s foot - wild geranium, or wood anemone bulbous buttercup (verified)
Crowdy kit - figwort
Cuckoo’s bread - common plantago
Cucumber tree - magnolia
Cuddy’s lungs - great mullein
Crown for a king - wormwood

Dagger flower - blue flag
Daphne - bay laurel
Dead man’s bells foxglove
Death angel - fly agaric Amanita Muscaria
Death cap - fly agaric Amanita Muscaria
Death flower - Yarrow
Death’s Herb - Belladonna
Delight of the Eye - rowan
Devil Plant - basil
Devil’s Apple - Mayapple or Mandrake
Devil’s beard - houseleek
Devil’s bit - false unicorn root
Devil’s cherries Belladonna berries
Devil’s plaything - yarrow
Devil’s dung - asafoetida
Devil’s ear - wakerobin
Devil’s eye - henbane or periwinkle
Devil’s flower - bachelor’s buttons
Devil’s fuge - mistletoe
Devil’s guts - dodder
Devil’s herb - belladonna
Devil’s milk - celandine
Devil’s nettle - yarrow
Devil’s Shoestring: Various varieties of vibernum, esp Black Haw, cramp bark, hobblebush
Dew of the Sea - Rosemary
Dog Berry - wild rose hips
Dog’s mouth - snap dragon
Dog’s tongue - hound’s tongue
Dove’s foot - wild geranium
Dragon - tarragon
Dragon Flower - blue flag (really, wild iris? not an arum or a Antirrhinum?)
Dragon wort - bistort
Dragon’s blood - calamus

Eagle - ramsons Allium ursinum
Earth apple - potato
Earth smoke- fumitory
Elf’s wort - Elecampane
Enchanter’s plant - vervain
Englishman’s fruit/ White man’s foot - common plantain
Everlasting friendship - goosegrass
Eye root - goldenseal

Fairy smoke - Indian pipe
Fairy fingers - foxglove
Fat from a Head - spurge *
Felon herb - Mugwort
Five fingers - cinquefoil
Fox’s Clote - burdock
Frog’s foot - bulbous buttercup
From the belly - Earth-apple. * potato?? Did the writers know about potatoes? When was pgm written?
From the foot - houseleek *
From the loins - chamomile *

Goat’s foot - morning glory
Goat’s Horn - Fenugreek Trigonella foenum-graecum
God’s hair - hart’s tongue fern
Golden’s star - avens
Gosling’s wing - goosegrass
Graveyard dust - mullein (and sometimes it’s just graveyard dust)

Hag’s taper - mullien stalk
Hagthorn - hawthorn
Hair of Venus - Maidenhair fern
Hairs of a Hamadryas Baboon: Dill Seed *
Hare’s beard - mullein
Hawk’s Heart, Old Woman - Wormwood Artemisia absinthium crown or seed head *
Hind’s tongue - hart’s tongue fern
Holy herb - yerba santa
Holy rope - hemp agrimony Eupatorium cannabinum
Horse tongue - hart’s tongue fern
Hundred eyes - periwinkle

Innocence - bluets

Jacob’s Staff - Great Mullein
Joy of the Mountain - Marjoram
Jupiter’s Staff - Great Mullein

King’s Crown: Black Haw vibernum
Knight’s Milfoil - Yarrow
Kronos’ Blood - sap of Cedar *

Lady’s glove - foxglove
Lamb’s ears - betony but more likely lamb’s ear Stachys byzantina
Lion’s Hair - The extra little roots that stick out of the turnip bulb or the base leaves Brassica rapa *
Lion’s tooth - dandelion
Little dragon - tarragon
Love in idleness - pansy
Love Lies Bleeding - amaranth (Not so ancient, a modern ornamental variant)
Love Leaves - burdock
Love man - goosegrass
Love Parsley - lovage
Love root - orris root

Maiden’s Ruin - Southernwood
Man’s Bile - Turnip Juice *
Man’s Health - Ginseng
Master of the Woods - Woodruff
May Lily - Lily of the Valley
May Rose - Black Haw viburnum
May - Black Haw viburnum
Maypops - Passion Flower
Mistress of the Night - Tuberose
Mutton Chops - Goosegrass

Nose Bleed - Yarrow

Old Man’s Flannel - Great Mullein
Old Man’s Pepper - Yarrow
Old-Maid’s-Nightcap - Wild Geranium

Password - primrose
Peter’s Staff - Great Mullein
Poor Man’s Treacle - Garlic
Priest’s Crown - Dandelion leaves

Queen of the Meadow Root - Gravelroot
Queen of the Meadow - Meadowsweet
Queen of the Night - Vanilla Cactus

Rats and Mice - Hound’s tongue
Ram’s horn - valerian
Ring a Bells - bluebell
Robin run in the grass - goosegrass

Scaldhead - blackberry
Seed of Horus - horehound
See bright - Clary sage
Semen of Ammon - Houseleek *
Semen of Ares - Clover *
Semen of Helios - White Hellebore *
Semen of Hephaistos - Fleabane *
Semen of Herakles - arugula *
Semen of Hermes - Dill *
Seven Year’s Love Yarrow
Shameface - Wild Geranium
Shepherd’s Heart - Shepherd’s Purse
Silver Bells - Black Haw viburnum
Snake Root - black cohosh
Soapwort - Comfrey or Daisy or maybe Soapwort
Sorcerer’s Violet - Periwinkle
Sparrow’s Tongue - Knotweed
St. John’s Herb - Hemp Agrimony
St. John’s Plant - Mugwort
Star Flower - Borage
Star of the Earth - Avens
Starweed - Chickweed
Sweethearts - Goosegrass
Swine’s Snout - Dandelion leaves

Tail of a Pig - Leopard’s bane *
Tanner’s bark - toadflax
Tartar root - ginseng
Tears of a Hamadryas Baboon - Dill Juice *
Thousand weed - yarrow
Thunder plant - houseleek
Titan’s Blood - Wild Lettuce Lactuca virosa *
Torches - mullein flower stalk

Unicorn’s horn - unicorn root or false unicorn root
Urine - dandelion or maybe urine

Wax dolls - fumitory
Weasel - rue
Weasel snout - yellow archangel
Winter wood - wild cinnamon Canella alba
White - ox eye daisy
Witch’s Asprin - white willow bark (this is ancient?)
Witch’s brier - wild brier rose hips
Wolf claw - club moss
Wolf’s foot - bugleweed
Wolf’s milk - euphorbia
Woodpecker - herbLpeony
Worm fern- male fern Dryopteris Felix-mas

Yerba Santa Maria - epazote

Plant Parts/Body Parts

Blood - Sap or juice
Eye - The disc of a composite flower, or a seed
Foot - Leaf
Guts - Roots, stalks, tangly bits
Hair - Very stringy roots (sometimes silk or tangly stems)
Head - Flower head or seed head
Tail - Stem
Tongue - Petal, sometimes stigma
Toes - leaf or bud
Paw - sometimes bud, usually leaf
Privates - Seed pod
Worm - stringy roots
Wool - Moss

Minerals

A Snake’s Ball of Thread - soapstone *
Blood of a Snake - hematite *
Crocodile Dung - Soil from Ethiopia *
A Physician’s bone - sandstone *

Animal Parts

A Snake’s Head - A leech *
Blood of a Hyrax - A rock badger, * small weasel-like/rodent-like (but actually neither) creature native to Africa and the Middle East
Blood of a Hamadryas Baboon - Blood of a spotted gecko *
Bull’s semen - the egg of a blister beetle *
Lion Semen - Human semen *
Kronos’ Spice - Pig Milk *

* From Ecloga ex Papyris Magicis: Liber I, V, xxvi



More Sources for verification -

  • Galen - De succedaneis, Claudii Galeni Opera Omnia, v 19
  • Paulus Aegineta, Corpus Medicorum Graecorum IX/2 vII
  • Dioscorides De Materia Medica
  • Witchipedia
  • Lady Raven
  • Tryskelion
🌛IMPORTANT WITCH TIP🌜

In old recipes and spells, strange ingredients are often called for such as “Eye of Dog” or “Bone of a Dead man.” Through research (of Cunnigham and my Grandma) I found out what’s REALLY being requested.😊 .

Examples:

Eyes: Eyebright or Daisy
Blood: Sap
Fingers: Cinquefoil
Hair: Maidenhair Fern
Skin of a Man: Fern
Piss: Dandelion
Bloody Fingers: Foxglove
Unicorn Horn: Unicorn Root

So when these animals are asked for, use this herb instead:

Sheep: Dandelion
Dog: Couchgrass
Lamb: Lamb’s Lettuce
Cat: Catnip
Rat: Valerian
Weasel: Rue
Nightingale: Hop
Cuckoo: Plantain
Hawk: Hawkweed
Linnets: Eyebright
Woodpeckers: Peony
Snake: Fennel or Bistort
Frog: Cinquefoil
Toad: Sage
Lizard: Calamint.

FUN FACT: When a sacrifice is called for, it means you should bury an egg, NEVER does it mean to kill any living thing!!!

HERBAL CODE:
The part called for in a recipe means the part of the herb to be used, as follows;

Head: the flower
Paw, foot, leg, scale: leaf
Tooth: leaf, seed pod
Guts: root or stalk
Tail: stem
Tongue: petal
Privates: seeds
Hair: the dried version of the herb
Eye: the inner blossom
The heart: the bud or a big seed.

A lot of plants like Crowfoot or Cat’s Tail are usually found in old recipes, do not mistake them for actual animal parts! Practice safely and have a Blessed Evening! 🌛🌝🌜

anonymous asked:

i have a prompt for you: what if snape hadn't called lily 'mudblood' that day. what if their friendship had stayed strong, unbreakable. would he have grown to be a better person? would lily have loved him, rather than james? would harry just have another godfather? would james and lily have survived?

Okay you have successfully convinced me to write a Snape thing, which is a possibility I have audibly forsworn many times to my loved ones. But I’m a sucker for concepts like “Harry gets another godfather,” so, here we go.


When Severus was seven, he fell in love with the girl down the street. She had long red hair and dirty knees and she offered him half her candy bar one drizzly afternoon, waiting outside the school for her parents to come pick her up.

His parents weren’t coming— dad working late and mum at the pub recounting old Hogwarts glory stories, talking of years when her life was magical– but he didn’t tell Lily that. He was just waiting for the older bully boys who lurked in the empty lot on his way home to get bored and leave.

He ate the candy slowly in neat little bites while she grinned and told him about her big sister’s feud with the science teacher, like her Tuney was some sort of hero in a political espionage drama. She talked with her hands, narrow little things with freckled backs. He watched her wave from the back window of her mother’s car and then he started the long walk home.

When Severus was fifteen, James Potter dangled him upside down in the quad and laughed. Severus landed on elbows and knees. The bruises would stay for a week. The memories would not die with them— James’s cocky grin, the laughter in the spring air, the long whip of Lily’s red hair.

He felt small, bug-like, his knees pressing into the grass. His mother would come home some nights, kick the threadbare carpet, rattle the battered old pans in the cupboard, curse a Ministry that hated purebloods, that sucked up to halfbreeds and Mudbloods, that left the true wizards to rot in filth. He would curl up, make himself small, bug-like, imagine a chitinous shield growing over his shoulders, his spine, the softness of his kidneys. Some days, his father slept through this. Some days he screamed back.

After Severus met Lily, he would curl up under his covers, small, bug-like, and read through the comics she’d lent him with his hands pressed up over his ears. He wanted Professor X to come take him away. He wanted to be someone special, someone saved. He wanted a giant to burst through his door and frighten his mother and offer him a squashed birthday cake and a way out.

When Severus was fifteen, he slammed to his knees on the green Hogwarts quad. Laughter burrowed into his ears, like curses, like the nights his father screamed back, and when Lily stepped toward him he snapped, “I don’t need help from a Mudblood.”

When Severus slouched up to her door that summer, Lily didn’t invite him in. She leaned on the open frame of the door, arms crossed. He had so rarely seen Lily neither smiling or incandescent with rage, but she watched him with snakeskin eyes and a set mouth, still.

“I’m sorry,” he said. “I didn’t–”

She twitched a strand of hair over her shoulder, the irritation the closest thing to an emotion he could spot on her. He was watching, desperate– this was Lily, she gave things away. She talked with her hands. He never felt lost, with her. “But why,” said Lily. “Why are you sorry? Because I’m upset, or because what you did was wrong?”

“I didn’t mean to hurt you.”

“You did, and it’s not the point. I don’t care if it’s the part you care about, Sev, it’s not the part that matters. That was an awful thing to say– to say to anyone. You were cruel because you were scared and embarrassed, but Sev I could really care less. You were cruel.”

“I’m sorry,” he said again.

“Sorry’s not enough, Sev. Be fucking better.”

He jerked back and tried to turn it into some kind of laugh. “Language, careful, your mum might hear.”

She shrugged, and stepped back through the open door, and shut it in his face.

He spent the summer reading comic books, haunting the local library, then the local park once it’d closed, and then sneaking home when he was hopeful his parents would be asleep. He tried to think about bravery, but sometimes he just thought about Lily’s hair, the way it went more golden in summer. He tried to think about nobility, ethics and grace, but the clouds chased each other, fat and white, across the sky and he wasn’t sure what any of this had to do with him.

His father took him fishing by a dreary brown creek and they sat in silence. Severus could hear every creak of the rods, every lap of the water, every inhale and movement his father made. He thought maybe if he just said nothing, nothing ever, he’d never say anything again that made Lily’s face go so flat and distant. If he said nothing, maybe nothing would hurt.

His father reached back for a beer can in a swift movement and Severus froze himself unflinching. He sat in that silence afterward, slowing his heartbeat, picking apart the sudden rigid shell of his shoulders. His father hummed, cracking the can open like a gunshot.

He sat alone on the Hogwarts Express that year, stuffed in a compartment with a handful of second years who gave him half the seats while they giggled among themselves about the haircut of someone named Gertrude. Every summer’s end, for five years, he and Lily had boarded the train together, pressed their noses to the window glass, and watched the land rush by.

For the first month of school, Severus practiced pausing before he spoke, for seconds, minutes if he needed them. Sometimes he’d add an answer after the conversation had already moved on, bent over his mashed potatoes, weighing words as carefully as he weighed salamander eyes and mandrake root.

(If you crushed firedrake seeds with the flat of your blade, instead of cutting them, they made a more potent potion. The textbooks told you to stir six times counterclockwise to make Sleeping Draught, but he knew–because he had thought, and tried, and tried again–that if you did five counterclockwise and two clockwise the draught would turn that perfect turquoise and the sleep would be dreamless and sweet and deep. He kept notes in his textbook’s margins, because it helped to remember.)

In the second month, he tried to listen. People were starting to think about life after school, a big yawning chasm they were supposed to fill with themselves. People were starting to fall in love, puppyish and petty. People were starting to believe in the war, whispering, dreaming, fearing.

In the common room, one of the kids said something about Mudbloods and Severus’s head snapped up. He tried to imagine a shell growing into his shoulders, over his spine, covering all the soft parts of him. He wanted his covers, he wanted to shrink, he wanted Lily’s boxfuls of comics, but he rose to his feet and snapped back. Sometimes saying nothing hurt people, too. A small Muggleborn in green and silver ducked away to her dorm, clutching quietly at her sleeves.

For the third month, he tried to watch– not for warning sneers or cocky grins, clenched fists and broad shoulders, all the things he’d been watching for since before he could name them– but for the way shoulders might go rigid, the way fists might clench but hide, wishing for something to shield every soft part of them.

Severus was bony and pimply, sixteen years old and graceless in it, but he could be an interruption. He could mock with the best of them, flicking his brows and twisting his nose, and asking pointed questions. He could talk, smart-mouthed and snide, until the focus turned to him, and then he could survive anything they handed out. He could give as good as he got. The pauses were shorter, these days, before he spoke, but they would always be there, an echo offset from the shout, an avalanche that struck late and terrible.

When kids cried in bathrooms or empty classrooms or the library, he didn’t move to comfort them, though he heard them. He didn’t know how. He wrote his own curses, out in the forest where he could scar the trees in experiment, and they all turned out bloody. He loved few things, even Lily, as much as he loved pouring all of himself into his work, until something new and his own grew out of it. He wasn’t sure he’d ever invented something kind.

He didn’t try to find Lily, but he came back from the Forest once and almost tripped over her, half-napping in Hagrid’s pumpkin patch. He stumbled back into a gargantuan gourd while she pushed hair out of her face and peered up at him.

“I’m sorry,” he said, after a pause that rumbled and roiled in his gut, that he clung to with both hands, breathing into it and letting his shoulders go soft. “I’m sorry I said it. I’m sorry I made you feel small because I was feeling– small.”

Lily sat up a bit, in the little semi circle she’d built herself of books and scrolls and gobstones and snacks. She had built fairy circles like that, when they were children, of the flowers he’d transfigured for her.

“I’m sorry anyone has to feel that way, ever,” he said. “They shouldn’t. I’m angry anyone has to feel that way.”

“Me, too,” she said, and, fishing around in the detritus that surrounded her, handed him half a candy bar. “C'mon, you want some tea? Hagrid said he’d put a kettle on for me if I finished my Arithmancy.”

When Severus was in sixth year, Remus Lupin almost killed him on a moonlit night.

Severus had wanted answers, had wanted to get them in trouble, had wanted something a bit like vengeance, and Sirius had told him about the Whomping Willow. Sirius had grinned when he’d done it, small and bitter, and Severus had wondered if he was fighting with James again, wondering why else he’d sell out his friends.

“I didn’t think–” Sirius tried, the morning after, watching Remus across dry toast and cocoa, big juicy bowls of melon.

“You never do,” Remus snapped. (A bare handful of years later, standing in the smoldering ruins of James and Lily’s house, Remus would think about Sirius’s erratic gaze, the sharp edge of his voice, his last name, and wonder if he should have seen it coming. What here was premeditated? What was mischief? Sirius had once almost painted Remus’s own hands with red blood.)

But for now, Remus was sixteen and angry; he was sixteen and guilty of things that might have happened. He didn’t speak to Sirius for a month.

James refused to speak with Sirius, too, but he only lasted a week. Moony was sulking and Peter was busy studying his little heart out, and James got twitchy without proper and regular socialization.

“I’ll punch him in the nose,” said Lily, when Severus told her. She shifted where she sat cross-legged on the library table, like she might go off and hunt him down that second.

“Black doesn’t deserve the attention,” said Severus.

“Getting his ass kicked by a girl? That type of attention?”

“Getting his ass kicked by Lily Evans,” Severus said. “It’d be an honor and you know it.”

Reports of violence outside Hogwarts got worse. People were disappearing. People were whispering, fearing. The papers were ignoring the important things, and feeding off the fearmongering, or so Lily announced in the library while Severus was trying to study.

Alice and Lily had spent years sharing hissed rants in humid greenhouses. Over an undulating bed of luminescent deadly nightshade, Alice bent her head close to Lily’s and asked, “Have you heard of the Order of the Phoenix?”

Keep Reading (Ao3)

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Common Toxic Herbs and their Effects

This is not a complete list by any means, but these commonly noted plants, herbs, and flowers should be handled with care or avoided altogether. 

Aconite (Wolfsbane, Monkshood) - all parts: dermatoxic, hepatotoxic, and neurotoxic

Adam and Eve (Jack-in-the-Pulpit, Wild Arum) - root: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested

African Sumac - leaves: dermatoxic; possibly fatal

Agave - juice: dermatoxic  

Angel’s Trumpet - all parts: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Apple - seeds: cytotoxic in large doses

Apricot - leaves and seeds: cytotoxic in large doses

Arnica - gastrotoxic 

Asparagus - berries: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested

Azalea - all parts: cytotoxic and neurotoxic; rarely fatal

Betel Nut Palm (Pinyang) - all parts: gastrotoxic if ingested

Bittersweet Nightshade - all parts: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; rarely fatal

Black Hellebore - all parts: cardiotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Black Locust (False Acacia) - root bark and flowers: gastrotoxic

Black Nightshade - all parts except ripe fruit: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Bleeding Heart - leaves and roots: neurotoxic

Bloodroot - rhizomes: cytotoxic

Blue Passion Flower (Common Passion Flower) - leaves: cytotoxic

Bracken - all parts: carcinogenic

Buttercup - all parts: gastrotoxic and dermatoxic 

Calabar Bean (Ordeal Beans) - seeds: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested in large doses

Cassava - leaves and roots: cytotoxic in large doses

Castor Bean (Castor Oil Plant) - seeds: cytotoxic if ingested or inhaled

Celandine - nephrotoxic 

Cherry - leaves and seeds: cytotoxic in large doses

Christmas Rose - all parts: gastrotoxic

Cocklebur - seedlings and seeds: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic

Columbine - seeds and roots: cardiotoxic; easily fatal

Corn Lily (False Hellebore) - all parts: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Cowbane (Water Hemlock, Snakeweed) - root: neurotoxic if ingested

Daffodil - bulbs and stems: gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Datura/Moonflower - all parts: gastrotoxic and cardiotoxic

Deadly Nightshade (Belladonna) - all parts: cardiotoxic and neurotoxic; often fatal

Desert Rose (Sabi Star, Kudu) - sap: cardiotoxic with skin contact

Dumbcane - all parts: dermatoxic; possibly fatal

Elder (Elderberry) - root: gastrotoxic

Elephant Ear (Angel Wings) - all parts: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic

Ergot - neurotoxic 

Foxglove - leaves, seeds, and flowers: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Garlic - all parts: gastrotoxic in some animals

Giant Hogweed - all parts: dermatoxic

Golden Chain - all parts, especially seeds: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Goldenseal - all parts: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic in large doses

Grapes/Raisins - all parts: gastrotoxic in dogs

Greater Celandine - all parts: gastrotoxic in large doses

Hemlock (Spotted Cowbane, Poison Snakeweed) - all parts: neurotoxic; possibly fatal

Hemlock Water Dropwort - roots: neurotoxic if ingested; possibly fatal

Henbane - all parts: neurotoxic and cardiotoxic

Holly - berries: gastrotoxic

Honeybush - all parts: gastrotoxic

Honeysuckle - berries: gastrotoxic in mild cases and cardiotoxic in severe cases

Horse Chestnut - all parts: neurotoxic

Hyacinth - bulbs: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic; possibly fatal

Iris - rhizomes: gastrotoxic and dermatoxic 

Jequirity (Crab’s Eye, Rosary Pea) - seeds: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; often fatal

Kava Kava - nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic 

Kidney Bean - raw: gastrotoxic

Larkspur - young plants and seeds: neurotoxic; often fatal

Lemon - oil: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic to animals  

Lily - all parts: nephrotoxic

Lily of the Nile (Calla Lily) - all parts: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic if ingested; possibly fatal

Lily of the Valley - all parts: cardiotoxic; possibly fatal

Lima Beans - raw: gastrotoxic

Lime - oil: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic in animals

Lobelia - all parts: gastrotoxic 

Mandrake - roots and leaves: gastrotoxic and neurotoxic

Mango - peel and sap: dermatoxic

Mangrove - bark and sap: dermatoxic and eye irritation

Mayapple - all green parts and unripe fruit: gastrotoxic

Meadow Saffron (Autumn Crocus) - bulbs: gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Mistletoe - leaves and berries: gastrotoxic, cardiotoxic, and neurotoxic; rarely lethal in adults

Moonseed - fruits and seeds: gastrotoxic; often fatal

Mountain Laurel - all green parts: gastrotoxic

Nutmeg - raw: psychoactive in large doses

Oak - leaves and acorns: gastrotoxic; rarely fatal

Odollam Tree (Suicide Tree) - seeds: cardiotoxic; often fatal

Oleander - all parts: dermatoxic, cardiotoxic, and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Onions - all parts: gastrotoxic in animals

Orange - oil: dermatoxic and gastrotoxic in animals

Peach - seeds and leaves: cytotoxic in large doses

Pokeweed - raw leaves, berries, and roots: gastrotoxic and dermatoxic; often fatal

Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac - all parts, especially leaves: dermatoxic; possibly fatal

Poison Ryegrass (Darnel) - seeds: neurotoxic

Potato - raw: cytotoxic

Privet - berries and leaves: neurotoxic and gastrotoxic; possibly fatal

Ragwort - all parts: hepatotoxic

Redoul - all parts: gastrotoxic, neurotoxic, and causes respiratory issues; can be fatal in children

Rhubarb - leaves: nephrotoxic

Skullcap - hepatotoxic

Spindle (Spindle Tree) - fruit: hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic; possibly fatal  

Stinging Tree (Gympie Gympie) - bark and sap: dermatoxic; sometimes fatal

Strychnine Tree - seeds: neurotoxic; often fatal

Sweet Pea - seeds: neurotoxic and damaging to connective tissues

Tomato - leaves and stems: cytotoxic in large doses

Uva Ursi - neurotoxic, dermatoxic 

White Baneberry (Doll’s Eyes) - all parts, especially berries: cardiotoxic; possibly fatal

White Snakeroot - all parts: gastrotoxic; often fatal

Winter Cherry (Jerusalem Cherry) - all parts, especially berries: gastrotoxic; occasionally fatal, especially to children

Wisteria - gastrotoxic

Yew (English Yew, Common Yew) - leaves and seeds: gastrotoxic if ingested and respiratory issues if inhaled


definitions of terms used in this list: 

  • carcinogenic - a substance that can cause cancer
  • cardiotoxic - toxic to the heart 
  • cytotoxic - toxic to living cells
  • dermatoxic - toxic to the skin
  • gastrotoxic - toxic to the gastrointestinal system (stomach, intestines, etc.)
  • hepatotoxic - toxic to the liver
  • nephrotoxic - toxic to the kidneys and urological system (ureters, bladder)
  • neurotoxic - toxic to the neurological system (brain, nerves, brainstem, spinal cord, etc.)
  • psychoactive - pertaining to substances that change brain function and result in alterations in perception, mood, or consciousness

last updated: 6-29-2016

Domestic Garden Witch: Shrines in the Garden

So maybe you’re a college witch with limited space and money, limited to the one window in your dorm. Or, maybe you’re a witch without extensive backyard space who wants to start up a magical garden. Perhaps you’re a kitchen witch who wants the freshest herbs right at her fingertips.

For many witches, having a garden seems to be a bit of a no-brainer. After all, plants and magic go hand-in-hand. Plus, when thinking of a witch, it’s hard not to think of a cottage in the woods with a little vegetable garden out front. Unfortunately for the majority of us, our cottage in the woods is a tiny flat, and our garden out front is a windowsill with limited space.

This is when it comes time to embrace your craftiness and bring your garden indoors! Not only does it place your garden in a convenient location, it also allows you to freshen the air, recycle what would otherwise harm the earth, and embrace your witchy green thumb!

A Practice As Old As Time

In previous Domestic Garden Witch articles, I’ve covered setting up altars and arranging gardens so as to be living altars. As witches, we are often looking for ways in which we can reconnect with nature and find harmony with its ebb and flow. For as long as mankind has been around trees, it seems as though these impressive and beautiful plants have inspired and drawn us closer to the divine.

Nearly every culture has something to say when it comes to trees - their growth patterns, their spiritual significance, and even the varying properties of their constituent parts. Roots, leaves, branches, seeds or fruit, and wood… all have a part to play in many religions. This is particularly true for modern druidic practice, which draws from Celtic lore and centers around the magic in certain woods. And as can be seen from my current Runic Friday series on the Ogham, certain woods were prominent enough in Celtic lore to inspire a form of divination symbolized by Irish Celtic writing.

There are many ways in which we can bring the magic of trees into our lives, but when it comes to garden magic, I have yet to see a method so endearing as building shrines on or near them.

Simple or Complex, Religious or Spiritual

Shrines are most often associated with religion - especially religions such as Hindu, Shinto, and Buddhism. In short, a shrine is a type of altar which is usually dedicated to a specific god, spirit, or ancestor as opposed to being devoted to whole pantheons. Depending on the practice, these shrines can be ornate or very simple.

But shrines aren’t limited to religion or ancestor worship. Like altars, they can be places of meditation or magical working, and therefore can have a place in spirituality regardless of the faith practiced.

Tree shrines are a great way of integrating your practice with your garden, providing a place to meditate or work magic, or to honor deities. As an added benefit, they can be used to honor the spirit within the tree if desired. For those on a budget, the shrine need not be overly fancy - a small altar made of stone or wood at the base of the tree is sufficient. But if fancier shrines are more your style, inspiration can be drawn from real world shrines, which are often built into the hollows of trees or carved into them. Here, offerings can be made or deities worshipped as you see fit.

Consider the role the tree plays in your garden, and build your shrine with that in mind. Is your oak tree a silent protector? Or perhaps you feel that your maple tree brings luck and money to your home? If this is a tree in your orchard, the shrine may be a way by which you can ask for healthy and bountiful harvests!

A few examples:

-Oak: Oak trees are common, and are often symbolic of protection, knowledge, wisdom, and strength. Building a shrine decorated with acorns and fallen oak branches may be a way of encouraging the oak to protect your home, or inspire the drive to learn in your heart. Or even, perhaps, it can be a way of honoring the Oak King if you follow the Wiccan Wheel of the Year!

-Maple: Often associated with the moon, maple trees are linked to both magic and healing. Shrines dedicated to bringing about good health and happiness are ideal with maple trees, allowing them to extend their healing energies to you!

-Pine: Pine trees, a mainstay in the northern hemisphere, are trees of strength and raw power. They are ancient and invoke a sense of mystery. Shrines built at the base of a pine tree can be dedicated to finding that primal strength that lives within all of us, and for helping us connect with the past. These are excellent trees for ancestor shrines, depending upon your practice.

-Apple: Speaking of ancestor worship, apple is associated with otherworld. Its link to the dead is on a mythical scope, lending its energies quite well to ancestor shrines. However, it is also a tree of fertility and choice. As such, shrines meant to encourage fertility in the garden or one’s own fertility are great when built at the base of an apple tree. Furthermore, it helps encourage decisive action, inspiring quick decision making and wise undertakings.

In Conclusion…

While this week’s article is quite different from most, it calls us back to a time when the gardens we tended were the ones planted by nature itself. Whether your shrine is dedicated to the tree or some other spirit, or if it is built to honor an altogether different plant, it is a useful tool for the garden witch who thrives when working magic outdoors.

Consider how your garden can benefit from the added spiritual energy of shrines. Perhaps the trees have more to offer than we may realize!

May all your harvests be bountiful! )O(

2

A Potion to Commune with an Animal Familiar

Working with spirit familiars is a common practice in many magical traditions. They act as guides, escorting Witches through the astral realms and aiding us in our magical workings. According to legend, familiar spirits can manifest themselves in animal form. When this apparition occurs, the Witch should take steps to strengthen the newly-formed bond. As the relationship between Witch and familiar develops, so too will the gifts they bestow.

@phat-lava requested a potion to commune with an animal familiar through dreams. To achieve this, I have written the following. As always, use caution when taking potions internally. Keep the #potionrequests coming!

Equipment Required

-          Boiling Crucible

-          Mortar and Pestle

-          Glass Vial

-          Measuring spoon

-          Wooden Spoon

-          Sieve

Ingredients Needed:

-          475ml Pomegranate Juice (2 cups)

-          44ml Absinthe (1 shot; available from any well-stocked liquor store)*

-          The skin of 1 red apple

-          1 fresh fig

-          1 tablespoon valerian root

-          ½ teaspoon poppy seed

-          13 rose hips

-          1 tablespoon of chamomile flowers, dried

-          1 teaspoon of honey

-          Essence of the animal spirit, optional (feather, fur, etc)

INSTRUCTIONS

1.        Heat the pomegranate juice over a high heat and bring to a boil.

2.       Lower the heat and bring the juice to a simmer then add the absinthe.

3.       Contribute the apple skin.

4.       Take the fresh fig and grind it into a fine paste using the mortar and pestle.           Contribute this to the brew.

5.       Raise heat and bring to a boil while stirring and concentrating on your                    intent. Allow it to boil for five minutes.

6.       Set the heat to its lowest setting and let the potion return to a simmer.

7.        Add the valerian root and continue simmering for five minutes.  

Make certain the potion is not allowed to return to boil after this point lest the properties of the valerian root are destroyed.

8.       Stir in the poppy seeds.

9.       Contribute the rose hips, one at a time, while concentrating on your intent.

10.     Add the chamomile flowers and simmer for five minutes.

11.      Contribute the honey, stirring vigorously to ensure it is well-blended into                the potion.

12.     If you have the animal essence, ensure it is clean then simply touch it to               the surface of the potion.

13.     Remove the potion from the heat and allow it to cool. Once cool, strain it             through a fine sieve.

14.    Pour off the potion into a small glass vial.

15.     Ingest the potion right before bed while concentrating on that which is                   sought: communion with your animal spirit. In @phat-lava’s case, this                   would be the raven.

*Nota Bene: for a non-alcoholic version, you can substitute one ounce of dried wormwood. 

ANALYSIS: Pomegranate and Absinthe (a wormwood derivative) have long been associated with the other world. Apples and figs also have spirit associations. Chamomile, valerian, rose hips, and poppy seeds all bring sleep. The animal essence can be used to heighten the strength of this working, but if your mind is strong enough, the animal essence isn’t required.

full moon in capricorn: illuminating our need to ground ourselves deeply and connect to the core of our being, to cultivate a strong foundation to grow from, and to nourish our goals & dreams. this full moon helps us move on from what holds us back and surrender negativity to the past. capricorn reminds us that transformation & progression require commitment, introspection, and grit. now is the time to plant new seeds or to nurture our roots; now is the time of renewal, of moving forward. 

meditate on the balance of being connected to both the universe and to the earth. recognize the power in both, see that power within yourself. it’s existed within you for so long, even when you weren’t conscious of it. with healing, gentleness, strength, & grounding, you can utilize that power to shift, to grow, to progress. this is the process of becoming, but we must do the work. ✨ 

There are going to be times in which you will lose yourself in a hollow state of mind. Remembering every single trifle mistake and embarrassing encounter that has ever occurred.

And in that instant you could possibly be getting coffee or at the checkout at a grocery store or maybe when your walking home; but no one will comprehend why all of a sudden you have blanked out and shut down on reality.

What they don’t see is that your entire mind and thoughts are filled with darkness, regrets, and anxiety. They won’t understand that all you need is a little time to recover, not their awful facial expressions. All you need is maybe a few minutes to grasp onto reality, to fight against the waves of depression that are trying to take a hold of you. To fight back the sadness and to attempt to carry on the rest of the day in a frolic manner. That you need is some time for ‘hope’ to resurface from the oil in your mind.

I truly hope you discover an individual who will tend to you as you suddenly abrupt into tears in the middle of the day. I hope that individual contains ample patience to hold you and simply wait for you to return to your normal state.

I hope they take the time to pull your weeds deeply rooted in your soul and have the courage to plant new seeds. I hope they stay long enough to water and tend to them until they have finally bloomed. Until you are slightly healed. Until you are you again.

Herbs/Food/Plants by Purpose

Banishing: Basil, Betel Nut, Black Pepper, Black Salt, Cactus, Cayenne Pepper, Chamomile, Cloves, Dragon’s Blood, Elder, Garlic, Heliotrope, Horehound, Juniper, Morning Glory, Mullein, Mugwort, Oleander, Onion, Rosemary, Rue, Sage, Sea Salt, St. John’s Wort, Thyme, Tobacco, Vinegar, Wood Betony, Yarrow Flower

Beauty: Avocado, Beet, Catnip, Chamomile, Evening Primrose, Flax, Ginkgo Biloba, Ginseng, Henna, Lady’s Mantle, Lemon, Lilac, Lucky Hand (Orchid Root), Magnolia, Maidenhair, Myrtle, Orange, Orange Blossom (Neroli), Orchid, Pea, Prune, Rose, Sunflower, Violet, Yerba Santa

Binding: Agrimony, Calamus, Crowfoot, Hydrangea, Ivy, Knotweed, Morning Glory, Skullcap, Snapdragon, Solomon’s Seal, Spiderwort, Vinegar, Witch Hazel

Cleansing/Purification: Angelica, Anise Seeds, Black Pepper, Cayenne Pepper, Cedar, Coconut, Dragon’s Blood, Fennel, Fern, Frankincense, Garlic, Ginger, Grapefruit, Guava, Honey, Horehound, Horseradish, Hyssop, Lavender, Lemon, Lemongrass, Lemon Verbena (Vervain), Lime, Marjoram, Melon, Mesquite, Parsley, Peppermint, Pine, Rosemary, Sage, Sandalwood, Sea Salt, Solomon’s Seal Root, Tangerine, Thyme, Turmeric, Vinegar, Yucca

Keep reading

Yesterday I saw an anti ironpanther post on my dash and surprise, surprise, spite is a very good motivator for me to start writing again. So have some courting, and arc reactor issues and getting together, since that is what @ir0nshield asked for. Watch out for the cut since this is almost 3k words long.


Dealing with T’Challa after the whole mess with the Accords was easier than Tony would have thought.

Sure, T’Challa, and T’Chaka before him, had been for the Accords in the first place, but T’Challa was also housing the rogue Avengers and Tony wasn’t sure what to expect from him.

But T’Challa was nothing if not polite, and Tony tried to be the same in return. After all, T’Challa was a big force behind the Accords and Tony could need him in his corner if Ross suddenly decided that Tony belonged into the raft as well.

Tony was rubbing at the skin around the arc reactor, the cold always made it hurt, when T’Challa entered the conference room.

“Mr. Stark,” he greeted Tony and Tony almost flinched.

“Let’s stick to Tony, Mr. Stark was my father, King T’Challa,” he said and T’Challa thoughtfully tilted his head.

“Only if you can forget the king,” he gave back and Tony huffed.

“Nothing easier as that, Mufasa.” Tony wasn’t sure if the Lion King was a thing over in Wakanda, but going by the tilt to T’Challa’s mouth it definitely was.

“I think I am more Simba than Mufasa, wouldn’t you agree,” T’Challa said and proved Tony right.

“If you say so, Simba,” Tony replied with a smile and then stilled when T’Challa’s gaze fell onto his chest.

“Is it still hurting from the injury?” he asked and Tony forced himself to lower his hand.

He never liked it when the attention was on the arc reactor.

“Maybe. It just hurts sometimes,” he gave back, not willing to tell T’Challa that it was the injury and the cold and the reactor in general. He didn’t need to know that.

T’Challa obviously noticed Tony’s hesitation in talking about the reactor and thankfully dropped the matter.

They were talking about Rhodey and his recovery when the other members of the Accords came in and from then on it was only business with them.

~*~*~

Keep reading

If a tree’s roots die, the tree dies. The only problem is that because roots are hidden underground you don’t know there’s a problem until it’s too late; the tree gets uprooted and taken out just like that –– a snap in the wind as it’s hollowed out from the inside.

That’s how Castiel felt. That’s exactly what he felt when Dean’s mind no longer spoke to him.

Keep reading

SEXUAL FRUSTRATION pt. 2 - JBB

{synopsis} platonic relationship between reader and bucky until bucky decides to help reader relieve some stress

{warnings} male masturbation, a shit load of dirty talk (i might’ve gone overboard), vaginal fingering, tease!bucky, denied orgasm, dom!bucky, very lowkey hate fucking (more on the reader’s side than anything), metal arm kink

{pairing} dom!bucky x fem!reader

{word count} 2045

tags - @arabellaaurorabarnes , @firebendergirl33 , @justonenobody , @harrisbn @madbabie

   It had been two weeks since their little incident, and when Bucky said he wanted to get Y/N riled up, he wasn’t lying. It had been absolute torture for our poor girl; with the looks Bucky gave her when he walked into a room, the sinfully tight shirts he wore during training, the small moments when no one was looking that he would grind up against her, speak lowly in her ear and then leave like nothing had happened. Just this morning he pulled something that nearly made Y/N explode…


   Y/N grumbled as she made her way down the hallway to the elevator; the only thing on her mind being food. She had spent the entire morning cooped up in her room, particularly to avoid making any and all contact with a certain James Barnes (who happened to reside three doors down from her). She thought she had been doing a good job so far, and had actually gone as far as to ask FRIDAY about Bucky’s location throughout her time hiding out, just in case he decided to surprise her. So, as she passed his room, Y/N was quite surprised (and very alarmed) to hear low moans coming from inside. She thought she had made sure that Bucky’s room was clear before she set off on her escapade to retrieve food… guess she was getting lazy.

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Lowland paca (Cuniculus paca)

The lowland paca is a large rodent found in tropical and sub-tropical America, from East-Central Mexico to Northern Argentina. It is about 60-80 cm in length. The lowland paca is mostly nocturnal and solitary and does not vocalize very much. It lives in forested habitats near water, preferably smaller rivers, and dig simple burrows about 2 m below the surface, usually with more than one exit. The lowland paca is a good swimmer and usually heads for the water to escape danger. It also is an incredible climber and it searches for fruit in the trees. Its diet includes leaves, stems, roots, seeds, and fruit, especially avocados, mangos and zapotes. It sometimes stores food.

photo credits: Ann Wuyts

I know that, in theory, love is supposed to be soft.
I have felt soft love, before, but—
for the last two months, love has been
sledgehammer to my nervous system.
It keeps taking me out at the knees.
For the thousandth time, I remind myself
that want and need are two different things.
I remind myself,
to be needed is not love.
I kiss like a seed trying desperately
to put down roots in wet soil.
I keep trying to turn wild animal.
He keeps trying to make a home from my skeleton.
Neither of us is doing this the right way.
In spite of that, we keep crashing our bodies together:
expecting someone to catch us even when we’ve become
falling anvils,
cartoon pianos,
sticks of live dynamite.
I’ve done this song and dance before. I already know
I will let him turn me shelter
even while my roof is leaking.
I’ll put my mouth everywhere that hurts.
I’m good at it: unearthing my foundations
and giving them to other people.
It’s no wonder I have trouble standing on my own two feet.
It’s no wonder I’m so prone to slide downhill.
Even then, I still believe in a love that will meet me
at my own altar.
A love that patches the holes in the ceiling.
A love who comes, heart in hand,
and means it.
—  UNTIL THEN by Ashe Vernon
How To Make And Prepare Herbs

Since the effectiveness and the value of most herbs are greatest when the plants are fresh, the best preparations are usually those that you make yourself from freshly gather herbs. And what a satisfying feeling to be able to identify your remedy in the field and to extract natures healing elements and put them to use, all through your own efforts! (Some plants, however, should be used only dried or in professional preparations to avoid or minimize the detrimental effects.)

But even the best plant materials can be ruined if you use the wrong kind of process in preparing your remedies. The choice depends primarily on the identity of the plant, the plant parts being used, the elements to be extracted, the form in which the remedy will be taken or applied, and the effect to be achieved. A little experimentation will soon indicate the adjustments that need to be made to suit you or someone else’s needs.

Don’t be impatient, though, if you don’t get immediate results from the preparations. Herbs are not one-shot wonder drugs in the modern sense; rather, their effectiveness is based on gradual action to restore the natural balance of bodily functions that constitutes health. Very few plant remedies produce lasting beneficial effects after only one or two doses; most treatments involve taking the remedy daily for at least several weeks of this is also greatly helped or hindered by your overall lifestyle, especially your diet. A healthful  diet and sufficient exercise to keep your body in good condition are valuable for both preventing much illness and for helping to overcome it when it does strike.

The only prepared remedies that can be kept for any length of time are ointments and those made with alcohol. The alcohol will preserve the latter, and a little gum benzoin or tincture or benzoin(a drop per ounce of fat) will preserve selves or ornaments made with a perishable base. Make infusions, decoctions, cold extracts, juice, poultices, and fomentations fresh each time. Whenever you do store any plant preparations, sterilize the containers before putting the preparations in them.

The following types of preparations are those most commonly and conveniently used in herbal medicine. The doses given our four average adult use and must be adjusted for age and condition for children and weak or elderly people, or when using very potent plants, use 130 to 2/3 the adult dose.

INFUSION

An infusion is a beverage made like tea, by combining boiling water with plants, usually the green parts or the flowers, and steeping to extract their active ingredients. The relatively short exposure to heat in this method of preparation minimizes the loss of volatile elements. The usual amount is about 1/2oz to 1oz to a pint of water. Most often the water is poured over the plants, but some recipes require that the plants be added to boiling water, the pot then being immediately removed from the heat. Use an enamel, porcelain, or glass pot to steep the plants for about 10 minutes; then cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid to minimize evaporation. For drinking, strain the infusion into a cup or glass. Sometimes sugar or honey is added to improve the taste. For most purposes, take the infusion luke warm or cool; but to induce sweating and to break up a cold or a cough, take it hot. Most herbal teas are taking over a period of time in small, regular doses ranging from a teaspoon to a mouthful. The cumulative daily dose usually ranges from 1 to 4 cups, depending on the severity of the problem and the potency of the plant.

DECOCTION

When you want to extract primarily the mineral salts and the bitter principles of plans, rather than the vitamins on volatile ingredients, decoction is your method of preparation. Hard materials such as wood, roots, bark, and seeds, also generally require boiling to extract their active ingredients. Boil about a half ounce plant parts per cup of water in it and I’m old or nonmetallic pot. Green plant parts can be added to cold water, brought to a boil,and boiled for 3 to 4 minutes; or they can be added to boiling water and then boiled for the same time. The mixture then steeps with a cover on the pot for 2 to 3 minutes. Hard materials need boiling for about 10 minutes the longer steeping to extract their ingredients. Strain of the plant parts before drinking or using the decoction. Directions for taking decoctions are the same as for infusions.

COLD EXTRACT

Preparation with cold water effectively preserve the most volatile ingredients and extract only minor amounts of mineral salts and bitter principles. Add about double the amount of plant material used for an infusion to cold water in and enamelled or nonmetallic pot. Let the mixture stand for 8 to 12 hours, strain, and the drink is ready. Directions for taking are the same as for infusions.  (Korach: I’ve had luck using oil and alcohol for Cold Extracts. My favorite being minced garlic in olive oil, I use it primarily for cooking)

JUICE

Chop fresh plants or plant parts up into small pieces and press to squeeze out the juice. Add a  little water to the pressed material and press again to get the rest. This is a good method for extracting water-soluble constituents, especially those sensitive to heat. It is excellent for getting vitamins and miinerals from the plant; but the juice must be taken within a short time after pressing, since a vitamin content declines rapidly after fermentation sets in.(Korach: Of course we also have Juicers & Cold Presses to do this)

POWDER

Grind dried plant parts with the mortar and pestle and or other implements until you have a powder. Powder can be taken with water, milk, or soup; sprinkled on food; or swallowed in gelatin capsules. A number 0 capsule holds about 10 grains; number 00 holds about 15 grains. The most common dose for powders is the amount that you can pick up on the tip of a dinner knife.

SYRUP

A basic syrup to which you can add medicine ingredients can be made by simply boiling 3lbs  of raw or brown sugar in a pint of water until it reaches the right consistency. Or you can boil the plant materials in honey or store-bought syrup and then strain through cheesecloth. Syrup is especially useful for administering medicines to children.

TINCTURE

Combine 1oz to 4oz powdered herb(the amount depends on the plant’s potency) with 8 to 12 ounces of alcohol. Add water to make a 50% alcohol solution(you have to know what percent alcohol you started). Let stand for two weeks, shaking once or twice a day; then strain and pour the liquid into a bottle suitable for storage. Like other alcoholic extracts tinctures will keep for a long time. Homeopaths use very dilute tinctures as their basic medicinal preparations.

ESSENCE

Dissolve an ounce of the herb’s essential oil in a pint of alcohol. This is a good way to preserve the volatile essential oils of many plants, which are generally not suitable in water.

OINTMENT

Mix well one part of the remedy in powdered form with four parts hot petroleum jelly, lard, or similar substance. For purists, an old method is to boil the ingredients in water until the desired properties are extracted. Strain the liquid add the decoction to olive or other vegetable oil, and simmer until the water has completely evaporated. Add beeswax as needed to get a firm consistency. Melt the mixture by heating slowly, and stir until completely blended. I was pointed out above, a little gum benzoin or a drop of tincture of benzoin per ounce of fat(when a Percival fat is used as a base) will help to preserve the ointment.

POULTICE

The poultice, or cataplasm, is used to apply a remedy to a skin area with moist heat. To prepair, bruise or crush the medicinal parts of the plant to a pulp mass and heat. If using dried plants(or if needed even with fresh plants), moisten the materials by mixing with a hot, soft, adhesive substance, such as moist flour or corn meal, or a mixture of bread and milk. Apply directly to the skin. A good way is to spread the pace or pulp on a wet, hot cloth, apply, and wrap the cloth around to help retain moisture and heat. Moisten the cloth with hot water periodically as necessary. Where the irritant plants are involved(as in a Mustard “plaster”), keep the pace between the two pieces of cloth to prevent direct contact with the skin; after removing the poultice, wash the area well with water or herb tea(especially camomile or mugwort) to remove any residue that may have gotten on the skin. You can use the poultice to soothe, to irritate, or to draw impurities from the body depending on which plant or plants you use.

FOMENTATION

Sook cloth or towel in an infusion or decoction, ring out the excess, and apply as hot as possible to the affected area. A fomentation has about the same applications as a poultice but is generally less active and its effect.

COLD COMPRESS

Soak cloth or towel in an infusion or decoction that has been cooled, wring out the excess, and apply to the affected area. Leave on until it is warmed by body heat, usually 15 to 20 minutes. Repeat application with a fresh cool compress. Continue until relieved.

HYDROTHERAPY: The Herb Bath

Hydrotherapy – the use of water for treatment of illness – is particularly popular in Europe, where health spas have elaborate facilities for all types of “water cures.” Often these include the use of mineral water or of mineral and herbal bath additives to enhance the natural healing power of the water or to produce particular effects on the body. But you don’t have to go to a European health resort to take healing baths: with a few simple supplies, you can enjoy the benefits right at home.

Full or partial herb baths come in all shapes and sizes, from the bathtub to the eyecup. Basically they are baths to which plant decoctions or infusions have been added. Depending on the plants used and the temperature, such baths can calm or stimulate the mind and body; open or close pores; relieve inflammation, itching, or pain; and exert various other beneficial effects.