the rev. martin luther king jr

Martin Luther King and the Montgomery story : how 50,000 Negroes found a new way to end racial discrimination : December 5, 1955, walk to freedom. December 21, 1956, victory for justice. Title from cover. Fellowship of Reconciliation, 1957.

  • Courtesy of the Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library
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Martin Luther King Jr. the Lost Speech - The Casualties of the Vietnam War

the reason that we are posting this speech is because we have a belief looking at the situation as it exists in politics today that Donald Trump is going to start a war. if he does it will be exactly the same war that Richard Nixon fought in Vietnam. He will do it by sending all minorities and people he considers undesirables. Just like Nixon, Trump will spill poor peoples blood. once again sending minorities off to foreign lands, to fight for those he considers too good to get their hands dirty for America’s RICH ideals. I lived during this time and I can tell you that I know what happened. Yes I followed it intensely as a child and a student. Richard Nixon was exactly who we see today Donald Trump. He is Hateful. He is a separationist. He has no relationship whatsoever to the majority of people in this country. People, who did not vote for Trump. People who he will end up disenfranchising purposely. Do not be deceived Do not look away and do not pretend this is not happening because America you made this. AMERICA you did this Stand up and look at yourself in the mirror. Look at yourselves and be disgusted at what you truly invented this time. Nothing but hate. Nothing but divisiveness. Nothing but pure lies. America this is what you have done now stand up and look at what you are going to have to deal with because you did it.
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The “We Shall Not Be Moved” march draws hundreds concerned about civil rights under Trump

WASHINGTON, D.C.A frigid rain poured on hundreds of protesters here Saturday, during the “We Shall Not Be Moved” march convened by prominent civil rights leaders in honor of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Although the rain undoubtedly suppressed turnout, the weather failed to deter marchers like 59-year-old Solomon Taylor of New York City who, in tribute to the late civil rights icon, brought along his teenage son, Daymon, to stress the import of King’s sacrifice. Read more.

Ezekiel’s Wheel Ties African Spiritual Traditions to Christianity

African-Americans have long been among the country’s most fervent Christians, from the choir to the pulpit to the affirming voices from every “amen corner.”

Their deep faith saw them through the trials of slavery and then a century of Jim Crow repression. Finally, it emboldened them to leave the sanctuary of their churches and join the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in a quest, his “dream,” for their full freedom and equality.

Just when and how their ancestors broke with traditional African spirit practices and adopted Christianity has never been fully resolved. Now archaeologists in Maryland have announced the discovery of an intact set of objects that they interpret as religious symbols — traditional ones from Africa, mixed with what they believe to be a biblical image: a representation of Ezekiel’s Wheel. Read more.

Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 3, 1968, a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King, and Ralph Abernathy.


AP

I’ve come upon something that disturbs me deeply. We have fought hard and long for integration, as I believe we should have, and I know that we will win. But I’ve come to believe we’re integrating into a burning house. I’m afraid that America may be losing what moral vision she may have had. And I’m afraid that even as we integrate, we are walking into a place that does not understand that this nation needs to be deeply concerned with the plight of the poor and disenfranchised. Until we commit ourselves to ensuring that the underclass is given justice and opportunity, we will continue to perpetuate the anger and violence that tears at the soul of this nation.

“I fear, I am integrating my people into a burning house.”

~ Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

We’re too celebratory of civil rights these days. We have these 50th anniversaries and everyone is happy and everybody is celebrating. Nobody is talking about the hardship.

It’s almost as if the civil rights movement was this three-day event: On Day 1, Rosa Parks didn’t give up her seat on the bus. On Day 2, [the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.] led a march on Washington. And on the third day, we signed all of these laws. And if you think about that history in that way, you minimize the trauma, the damage, the divides that were created. You can’t segregate and humiliate people decade after decade without creating long-lasting injuries.

— 

Bryan Stevenson 

Hear his interview.

Powerful Photos Of Black History

In this May 3, 1963 file photo,a 17-year-old civil rights demonstrator, defying an anti-parade ordinance of Birmingham, Ala., is attacked by a police dog.

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X waiting for an unspecified press conference on March 26, 1964.

Teenager Elizabeth Eckford (L) w. snarling white parents following as she is turned away fr. entering Central High School by Arkansas National Guardsmen under orders fr. Gov. Orval Faubus.

Rosa Parks, right, is kissed by Coretta Scott King, as she received the Martin Luther King, Jr. Non-violent Peace Prize in Atlanta, Jan. 14, 1980. Parks, who refused to give up her seat on a Montgomery, Ala., bus nearly 25 years ago, is the first woman to win the award.

Betty Shabazz at her husband, Malcolm X’s funeral in Hartsdale, New York in 1965.

In this January 1, 1945 photo, Lena Horne visits with the Tuskegee Airmen.

Day of Pilgrimage protest begins on December 5, 1955, with black Montgomery citizens walking to work, part of their boycott of buses in the wake of the Rosa Parks incident.

At the funeral for slain Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers, his wife, Myrlie Evers (second right), comforts their son, Darryl Kenyatta Evers, while daughter Reena Denise Evers (center, in white dress) wipes her own tears, Jackson, Mississippi, June 15, 1963.

1958: A Caucasian policeman speaks with African-American protesters during a sit-in at Brown’s Basement Luncheonette, Oklahoma.


Black history always has something to tell

#BlackHistory

Why is equality to assiduously avoided? Why does white America delude itself , and how does it rationalize the evil it retains?
The majority of white Americans consider themselves sincerely committed to justice for the Negro. They believe that American society is essentially hospitable to fair play and to steady growth toward a middle-class Utopia embodying racial harmony. But unfortunately this is a fantasy of self-deception and comfortable vanity.
—  Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “Where Do We Go From Here?” published posthumously.
Over the past two years, as I have moved to break the betrayal of my own silences and to speak from the burnings of my own heart, as I have called for radical departures from the destruction of Vietnam, many persons have questioned me about the wisdom of my path. At the heart of their concerns this query has often loomed large and loud: “Why are you speaking about the war, Dr. King?” “Why are you joining the voices of dissent?” “Peace and civil rights don’t mix,” they say. “Aren’t you hurting the cause of your people,” they ask? And when I hear them, though I often understand the source of their concern, I am nevertheless greatly saddened, for such questions mean that the inquirers have not really known me, my commitment or my calling. Indeed, their questions suggest that they do not know the world in which they live.
—  Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. “Beyond Vietnam– Breaking the Silence.” 4 April 1967. Riverside Church, NYC.
Why are there 40 million poor people in America? And when you begin to ask that question, you are raising a question about the economic system, about a broader distribution of wealth. When you ask that question, you begin to question the capitalistic economy. And I’m simply saying that more and more, we’ve got to begin to ask questions about the whole society. We are called upon to help the discouraged beggars in life’s marketplace. But one day we must come to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring.
—  Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., “Where Do We Go From Here?” (Aug 1967)
huffingtonpost.com
You've Never Seen These Black History Photos Before
The New York Times is publishing never-before-released photos from its archive.

PHOTO CREDIT: ALLYN BAUM/THE NEW YORK TIMES

The New York Times photographer snapped Dr. King’s picture as he participated in a roundtable that was broadcast on NBC.

PHOTO CREDIT: ALLYN BAUM/THE NEW YORK TIMES

1963: An iconic portrait of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was more or less shot from the hip. Allyn Baum snapped this photograph at a taping for a televised round table discussion that aired on NBC. You’d never guess, but Dr. King, looking past the viewer with a gaze for the ages, was seated at a table with four other panelists. 

To read the article and see more photos, visit: You’ve Never Seen These Black History Photos Before - Huffington Post