the rest of the comic as well

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PRINTS AVAILABLE ON SOCIETY6 !

 * HERE *


Aaaand, the diaporama of them all together.
My aim was to draw some of my favorite HP caracters doing something relaxing, that they enjoy. Because they have so many dangerous adventures… i wanted to see them having a rest.

So now it’s over -for now- and I’m returning to my work. XD (work is a comic about a love adventure King Francis of France had… Not nearly as fascinating as HP related stuff, but well… at least I turned King Francis into a pretty young man x3)

PUNCHES A WALL I fucking finally finished this song comic thing! I did the first two verses over two years ago? And when TRK came out I got really pumped because it suited the last verse! So well! And I sketched it out and then proceeded to literally procrastinate for an entire year

I was aiming to get this up last week for the one year anniversary of TRK/St Mark’s Eve, but life got in the way so it’s a bit late (but finally it is done, let me rest,) 

Made with SoundCloud
  • Person who doesn't read comics: Batman is so cool. He's such a loner. He doesn't need anyone to get the job done.
  • Me: You know he has like 9 kids, right?
  • Person who doesn't read comics: ...excuse me what?
  • Me: Yeah! Dick, Jason, Babs, Tim, Steph, Cass, Damian, Duke, and Harper.
  • Person who doesn't read comics: ...excuse me...what?
  • Me: I mean, he adopted Dick, Jason, Tim and Cass. Damian is his biological son. He just mentors the rest but they may as well be his babies. And then he has Alfred, and Leslie Thompkins, and quite a few allies he trusts. Superman, Wonder Woman. Batwoman.
  • Person who doesn't read comics: He hates Superman.
  • Me: Hahaha! Dude, they are like best bros. One time they limped through a sewer together after Metallo shot Clark with a Kryptonite bullet, reminiscing about old enemies. It was adorable!
  • Person who doesn't read comics: but-
  • Me: And then there's the squad of lady friends. Catwoman, Zatanna, Talia, Black Canary. I'm probably missing a bunch.
  • Person who doesn't read comics: I-
  • Me: :) :) :) :) :)
  • Person who doesn't read comics: BUT HE'S A LONER!
  • Me: Tell that to Damian. Bruce let him keep a cow in the batcave.
  • Person who doesn't read comics: *bursts into tears*
Iz Explains Stuff So You Don’t Have to: The Nightwing Debacle.

Hey guys! As promised, here’s a write up of what’s currently making waves in the DC/comic fandom today. Given that this subject somewhat related to the Hydra-cap nonsense, I thought it should be something I cover as well, just to sorta give non-comics fans/DC comics readers who might see this and want some context.

1. Who is Nightwing?

You guys know Robin, Batman’s sidekick who they almost always leave out of movies? This is the first (yes there’s more than one, but that’s a topic for another day) and possibly most iconic one to pop-culture. Named Richard “Dick” Grayson, Dick is the son of the flying Grayson’s , two circus acrobats who died due to mob interference during a show (he also has Romani heritage (which the comics often ignore) This will be important later). Bruce took Dick in and the rest is well history.

Dick probably has the most screen time over any Robin in film/tv adaptations, including Teen Titans, Young Justice, The Lego Batman movie, the original Adam West series, and Batman Forever. He’s arguably the best known Robin to non-comic’s readers.

Because time does pass in comics occasionally, Dick grew up and after a series of events that have been retconned so many times it’s not worth getting into, ditched the Robin mantle. He would later take up the title of Nightwing.

2. Why the name Nightwing?

Dick is a HUGE fan of Superman (no really, Superman is pretty much his uncle) and after he ditched the Robin title, Superman and him had a talk where Superman told him of two legendary kryptonian heroes Nightwing and Flamebird. Inspired by the story, Dick would take on the name of the former (the latter name has a much more varied history).

3. Okay, so what’s the big deal besides the Robin thing?

To compress a lot of history into a paragraph, Nightwing is the one DC hero that like almost every other DC hero trusts and likes. Most of the Justice League has known Dick since he was a little kid and trust him implicitly for both his general good nature and reputation of being like, a really fucking good guy. Like a really good guy. A good enough guy that when Batman was told to let his own world die to let a better more “ideal” world survive, he asked if Richard Grayson was in it to make his choice on if it actually was a better world. (Dick was not in this world, which made Batman hard pass on that shit. Really. This is a thing that happened.)

Dick has also led multiple successful superhero teams, worked on the league himself, and donned the Batman title for awhile.

4. Okay, got it. So what’s going on?

Today DC announced a new six issue limited series in an elseworld (which is a world that takes place outside of canon. Think an AU.) This is the summary:

NIGHTWING: THE NEW ORDER is the story of a future world without “weapons”—where superpowers have been eliminated and outlawed. The man responsible? None other than Dick Grayson, a.k.a. Nightwing, now leader of a government task force called the Crusaders who are charged with hunting the remaining Supers. But when events transpire which turn the Crusaders’ aim toward Grayson’s own family, the former Boy Wonder must turn against the very system he helped create, with help from the very people he’s been hunting for years—the last metahumans of the DC Universe.

5. OH NO IS THIS HYDRA CAP ALL OVER AGAIN?

Yes and no. So far, it’s safe to say that this series does echo Hydra Cap in a paragon for good and justice becoming the figurehead of a fascist regime. However, everything else is kind of more murky.

For one, this series is an elseworld, which means unlike Hydra Cap, it doesn’t take place in the regular DC universe. This is not the fate of the Dick Grayson we know and love, nor is it him; it’s a version of him in a different universe. It’s also a limited run, so we got an enddate on this sucker off the bat.

Second, this is more general fascism instead of nazi brand fascism. The first cover echoes other fascist/oppressive regimes but it applies to multiple besides the Nazi party. In the DC universe, metahumans aren’t coded as a minority group (though smaller subsets are, like the Superfamily being coded Jewish), so it’s more sci-fi than an allegory for real life oppression (though if depending on the details of this event, that remains to be seen. The writer took to Twitter to state there is absolutely no genocide here in this book but the first few pages imply otherwise and long story short, I’m not convinced). The group Dick works with is also entirely new and unlike Hydra has no link in history to the Nazi party, making the claim that they’re a general “evil fascist villain” hold water.

Third, unlike Hydra Cap, this book is branded as Dick learning the error of his choices rather than a long saga to try to convince us he has a point. I doubt we’ll see the same extent of “we should feel bad for Dick oppressing all these people” that we see in Hydra cap. However, this also remains to be seen. Long story short, it’s never gonna try to get us to root for the bad guy.

6. So it’s fine?

Now I wouldn’t say that. Making an iconic character a fascist is still something to side eye, and a lot of my above caveats can change if the story itself decides to make those connections (i.e if there are prison camps for example). It’s also important to note, that making a Romani character a fascist, and one under the label of “crusader” is in terrible taste, considering the Romani people’s history with both.

The writer is also someone I don’t have a ton of faith in when it comes to nuance. (though to his credit, he is assuring and validating concerns on twitter rather than laughing us all off as SJWs).

What I’m saying is that it’s gonna be hard to figure out exactly this is going to play out until I see the first issue. I think the storyline and the advertising is something we should be critical of, but a lot still depends on how the book approaches it. This isn’t to say you should “give it a chance” only that we might want to hold off from saying DC is promoting fascism until we see if they’re gonna take this from a “feel bad for Dick angle, not all fascists are bad” or a “Dick fucked up hard” angle. We can just say this storyline is at the very least insensitive given current events and Dick’s ethnic roots.

Plus, Dick turning on Superman is just weird, and the preview pages are not helping my concerns.

So be critical of the concept but be careful not to declare what the narrative is trying to say until we know what the narrative is.

7. And if it does come out to be “feel bad for Dick, not all fascists, narrative supports the fascist regime for just wanting the best for us” angle?

Then go crazy guys. Though even if it does go that way, it still won’t be as Hydra cap. Because at least it’s still only a elseworld.  Which is like the worst consolation prize ever.

Still Alive

I’m sure many of you are wondering where I’ve been these past few months. I’m afraid there isn’t an easy answer to that. Not one I can explain easily. My health has worsened once again. I’ve had to deal with kidney stone surgery and stomach issues along with a deepening depression and an increase of severity of my chronic fatigue. It has been a struggle to get through every day and I guess tumblr just didn’t seem like it mattered much anymore.

I lost touch with close friends and I stopped talking to my parents very much. I went into a shell and honestly I’m still not sure how to get out of it. I’m having a brief moment of clarity so I thought I should say something because I think some people might be a little worried about me.

Right now I am resting comfortably and keeping myself occupied with cartoons and other various shows. I try my best not to think about my predicament because as of yet, a solution has not presented itself. I’ve tried all of the depression medications. I’ve looked into new treatments. I just haven’t found anything that has any promise. For the time being I an stuck like this.
I probably won’t be around much. It’s really hard to even write this. But I’ll try to write a little more frequently if I can.

As it stands, right now I am focused on getting rid of my last kidney stone. Apparently there is a procedure that blasts it with sound waves and breaks it up into tiny particles. They put you under for that, but you get to go home the same day. I will be doing this in the next week or so. Hopefully it will make me feel a little better, but I can’t say for sure.

Chris and I are still putting out the monthly Patreon comics. I hope you still enjoy them.

I am going to get back to resting and trying to occupy my mind. I hope you all are well and I appreciate you always sticking with me, even if I disappear for a while.

4

(Plz fullscreen omg.)

I felt like drawing a comic again. This is what happened. I don’t think I’ve ever drawn a dog that good before, even if it is only a ‘dog’.

You can imagine it, though? A man an his weird poodle cross, busking at the corner of Main Street every sunny day, and you’ve never heard a violin sound quite like that before, never heard music come that easily before, and it brightens your day every time you hear him.

8

Royai Week 2017- Catalyst

Riza I know you meant no harm but I’m pretty sure you should give a guy a heads up before you knock his socks off like that? Now you have to deal with this for the rest of your life XD

3

happy fri-YAY ‪☆ this week was the first week of school for many of you and guess what? you survived! you did it! I hope you take this weekend to rest and relax (because it’s well deserved) ♡‬

Sorry that I haven’t been so active since my ask blog opened. I thought I might as well post this little thing for you guys that I forgot I did. Would you guys believe that these originally were my designs for Bendy and Alice? I decided to change them for my fanart as an exercise to draw outside of my comfort zone and it’s really helped me improve. I personally think I made the right choice to go with the rubber-hose look.

Anyways I’ve decided to make a schedule that may or may remain for the rest of the summer (if I get that job). I have commissions and that Benlice comic that I want to finish so I can focus solely on the ask blog. Which has been a blast so far you guys are awesome! I’m planning out how the comic will wrap up - with two more parts. As for my askblog I’ll say more on the actual blog.

Superman Starter Pack

First and most importantly, before we go into petty commercial concerns, let’s remember the meaning of this day. Because friends, this is no ordinary day: this is Miracle Monday, the anniversary of Superman triumphing over no less than the biblical prince of darkness himself (or at least a respectable substitute), and it was so awesome that even though it was expunged from humanity’s collective consciousness, they still instinctively recognized the third Monday of May as a day of good cheer to be celebrated in Superman’s honor from now until the end of time.

I know I write plenty about Superman on here, but with as much as a pain as comics can be to get into, I’m sure at least some of those I’m lucky enough to have follow me haven’t been able to find an easy in for the character. Or maybe a follower-of-a-follower or friend-of-a-friend is looking for a reasonable place to start. So in the spirit of the season, I’ll toss on the (admittedly already pretty massive) pile of recommended starting points on Superman: ten stories in a recommended - but by no means strict - order that should, as a whole, give you a pretty decent idea of what Superman’s deal is and why you should care, all of which you should be able to find pretty easily on Comixology or a local bookstore/comic book shop. I’ll probably do a companion to this in September for Batman Day.

1. Superman: Birthright

What it’s about: It’s his origin. He gets rocketed to Earth from the doomed planet Krypton, he gets raised by farmers, he puts on tights to fight crime, he meets Lois Lane and Lex Luthor, he deals with Kryptonite, all the standard-issue Superman business.

Why you should read it: It does all that stuff better than anyone else. He’s had a few different takes on his origins over the years due to a series of reboots, another of those tellings is even further down the list, but the first major modern one pretty much hit the nail on the head first try. It toes the tricky line of humanizing him without making you forget that hey, he’s Superman, it’s high-action fun without skimping on the character, and if there’s any one story that does the best job of conveying why you should look at an invincible man-god all but beyond sin or death with no major inciting incident in his background as a likable, relatable character, this is it. Add in some of the best Lane and Luthor material out there, and it’s a no-brainer.

Further recommendations if you liked it: About a decade before writing Birthright, its author Mark Waid worked with Alex Ross on what ended up one of DC’s biggest comics ever, Kingdom Come, the story of a brutal near-future of out-of-control superheroes that ultimately narrowed down to being about Superman above all else, and one of his most popular and influential stories of all time at that. Years after Birthright he created Irredeemable, the story of a Superman pastiche named Plutonian gone murderously rogue and how he reached his breaking point, illustrating a lot of what makes Superman special by way of contrast.

(Since Superman’s had so many notable homage/analogue/pastiche/rip-off/whatever-you-want-to-call-it characters compared to other superheroes, often in very good stories, there’ll be a number of those stories on this list.)

2. Superman: Up, Up and Away

What: Ever seen Superman Returns? That, but good. Clark Kent’s been living and loving a normal life as a reporter and husband after a cosmic dust-up in one of DC’s event comics took Superman off the board for a year, but mounting threats demand his return to save Metropolis again, if he still can.

Why: If you’d rather skip the origin, this is as a good a place as you’ll find to jump onboard. Clark and Lois both get some solid characterization, a number of classic villains have solid screentime, there’s some interesting Kryptonian mythology sticking its head in without being too intrusive, a great overarching threat to Metropolis, and it captures how Superman’s powers work in a visceral sense better than almost anything else. If you just want a classic, pick-it-up-and-go Fun Superman Story, this is where to go.

Recommendations: If you liked this, you’ll probably be inclined to enjoy the rest of co-writer Geoff Johns’ run on Action Comics, including most popularly Legion of Superheroes and Brainiac, both with artist Gary Frank. Another series tapping into that classic Superman feeling pretty well - regardless of whether you enjoyed the original show or not - is Smallville: Season 11, showing the adventures of that series’ young Clark Kent once he finally becomes Superman. Currently, Peter Tomasi and Patrick Gleason’s run on the main Superman title under the banner of DC Rebirth is maintaining that feeling itself, properly introducing Jon Kent, Lois and Clark’s 10-year-old-son, as Superboy in what seems to be a permanent addition to the cast and mythology (though there’s some continuity hiccups there, even as they’re mostly kept to the background - for the first 20 issues Superman is a refugee from a previous continuity, don’t ask).

3. Superman: Secret Identity

What: He’s Clark Kent, an aspiring writer from a farm town in Kansas. Problem is he’s only named after the other guy, an ordinary teenager who’s put up with crap his whole life for being named after a comic book character in an ordinary world. But when he suddenly finds himself far closer to his namesake than he ever would have imagined, it becomes the journey of his life to find how to really be a Superman.

Why: The best ‘realistic’ Superman story by a long shot, this doesn’t sideline its heart in favor of pseudo-science justifications for what he can do, or the sociopolitical impact of his existence. He has the powers, he wears the costume to save people (though he never directly reveals himself to the world), and in-between he lives his life and learns what it means to be a good man. It’s quiet and sweet and deeply human, and probably one of the two or three best Superman comics period.

Recommendations: Superman: American Alien is probably as close as there’s been to taking this kind of approach to the ‘real’ Superman, showing seemingly minor and unconnected snippets from his life, from childhood to his early days in the costume, and how they unconsciously shaped him into the man he becomes. If you like the low-key, pastoral aesthetic, you might enjoy Superman for All Seasons, or the current title Supergirl: Being Super. If you’d like more of writer Kurt Busiek’s work, his much-beloved series Astro City - focusing on a different perspective in the superhero-stuffed metropolis in every story - opens with A Dream of Flying, set from the point of view of the Superman-like Samaritan, telling of his quiet sorrow of never being to fly simply for its own sake in a world of dangers demanding his attention.

4. Of Thee I Sing

What: Gotham hitman Tommy Monaghan heads to the roof of Noonan’s bar for a smoke. Superman happens to be there at the time. They talk.

Why: A lot of people call this the best Superman story of the 90s, and they’re not wrong. Writer Garth Ennis doesn’t make any bones about hating the superhero genre in general (as evidenced by their treatment in the rest of Hitman), but he has a sincere soft spot for Superman as an ideal of what we - and specifically Americans - are supposed to be, and he pours it all out here in a story of what it means for Superman to fail, and why he remains Superman regardless. It sells the idea that an unrepentant killer - even one only targeting ‘bad guys’ like Tommy - would unabashedly consider Superman his hero, and that’s no small feat.

Recommendations: If you read Hitman #34 and love it but don’t intend to check out the rest of the series (why? It’s amazing), go ahead and read JLA/Hitman, a coda to the book showing the one time Tommy got caught up in the Justice League’s orbit, and what happens when Superman learns the truth about his profession, culminating in a scene that sums up What Superman Is All About better than maybe any other story. If you appreciated the idea of a classically decent Superman in an indecent world, you might enjoy Al Ewing’s novel Gods of Manhattan (the middle of a loose pulp adventure trilogy with El Sombra and Pax Omega, which I’ve discussed in the past), starring Doc Savage and Superman analogue Doc Thunder warring with a fascistic new vigilante in a far different New York City.

5. Superman: Camelot Falls

What: On top of a number of other threats hitting Superman from all sides, he receives a prophecy from the wizard Arion, warning of a devastating future when mankind is faced with its ultimate threat; a threat it will be too weak to overcome due to Superman’s protection over the years, but will still only just barely survive without him. Will he abandon humanity to a new age of darkness, or try and fight fate to save them knowing it could lead to their ultimate extinction?

Why: From the writer of Secret Identity and co-writer of Up, Up and Away!, this is probably the best crack at the often-attempted “Would having Superman be around actually be a good thing for humanity in the long term?” story. Beyond having the courtesy of wrapping that idea up in a really solid adventure rather than having everyone solemnly ruminate for the better part of a year, it comes at it from an angle that doesn’t feel like cheating either logically or in terms of the characters, and it’s an extremely underrated gem.

Recommendations: For the same idea tackled in a very different way, there’s the much better-known Superman: Red Son, showing the hero he would have become growing up in the Soviet Union rather than the United States; going after similar ideas is the heartfelt Superman: Peace on Earth. The rest of Kurt Busiek’s time on the main Superman title was great too, even if this stood easily as the centerpiece; his other trades were Back In Action, Redemption, The Third Kryptonian, and Shadows Linger. Speaking of underrated gems, Gail Simone’s run on Action Comics from around the same time with John Byrne was also great, collected in Strange Attractors. And since the story opens with an excellent one-shot centered around his marriage to Lois, I have to recommend From Krypton With Love if you can track it down in Superman 80-Page Giant #2, and Thom Zahler’s fun Lois-and-Clark style webcomic Love and Capes.

6. Superman Adventures

What: A spinoff of Superman: The Animated Series, this quietly chugged along throughout the latter half of the 90s as the best of the Superman books at the time.

Why: Much as stories defining his character and world are important, the bread and butter of Superman is just regular old fun comics, and there’s no better place to go than here for fans of any and all ages. Almost all of its 66 issues were at least pretty fun, but by far most notable were two runs in particular - Scott McCloud, the guy who would go on to literally write the book on the entire medium in Understanding Comics, handled the first year, and Mark Millar prior to his breakout success wrote a number of incredibly charming and sincere Superman stories here, including arguably the best Luthor story in How Much Can One Man Hate?, and a full comic on every page in 22 Stories In A Single Bound.

Recommendations: Superman has an embarrassment of riches when it comes to runs of just plain fun comics. For the youngest in your family, Superman Family Adventures might just be what you’re looking for. Supergirl: Cosmic Adventures in the Eighth Grade would fit on your shelf very well next to Superman Adventures. Superman: Secret Origin, while not the absolute best take on his early days, has some real charm and would be an ideal introduction for younger readers that won’t talk down to them in the slightest, and that you’ll probably like yourself (especially since it seems to be the ‘canon’ Superman origin again). If you’re interested in something retro, The Superman Chronicles cover his earliest stories from the 30s and 40s, and Showcase Presents: Superman collects many of his most classic adventures from the height of his popularity in the 50s and 60s. Age of the Sentry and Alan Moore’s Supreme would also work well. For slightly older kids (i.e. middle school), they might get a kick out of Mark Millar and Lenil Yu’s Superior, or What’s So Funny About Truth, Justice, and the American Way? And finally, for just plain fun Superman runs, I can’t ignore the last year of Joe Casey’s much-overlooked time on The Adventures of Superman.

7. Superman vs. Lex Luthor

What: Exactly what it says on the tin: a collection of 12 Luthor stories from his first appearance to the early 21st century.

Why: Well, he’s Superman’s biggest enemy, that’s why, and even on his own is one of the best villains of all time. Thankfully, this is an exceptionally well-curated collection of his greatest hits; pouring through this should give you more than a good idea of what makes him tick.

Recommendations: While he has a number of great showings in Superman-centric comics, his two biggest solo acts outside of this would be Brian Azzarello and Lee Bermejo’s Luthor (originally titled Lex Luthor: Man of Steel) and Paul Cornell’s run on Action Comics, where Lex took over the book for about a year. Also, one of Superman’s best writers, Elliot S! Maggin, contributed a few stories here - he’s best known for his brilliant Superman novels Last Son of Krypton and the aforementioned Miracle Monday, and he wrote a number of other great tales I picked some highlights from in another article.

8. Grant Morrison’s Action Comics

What: Spanning years, it begins in a different version of Superman’s early days, where an as-yet-flightless Clark Kent in a t-shirt and jeans challenged corrupt politicians, grappling with the public’s reaction to its first superhero even as his first true menace approaches from the stars. Showing his growth over time into the hero he becomes, he slowly realizes that his life has been subtly influenced by an unseen but all-powerful threat, one that in the climax will set Superman’s greatest enemies’ against him in a battle not just for his life, but for all of reality.

Why: The New 52 period for Superman was a controversial one at best, and I’d be the last to deny it went down ill-advised roads and made outright bone-stupid decisions. But I hope if nothing else this run is evaluated in the long run the way it deserves; while the first arc is framed as something of a Superman origin story, it becomes clear quickly that this is about his life as a whole, and his journey from a cocksure young champion of the oppressed in way over his head, to a self-questioning godling unsure of the limits of his responsibilities as his powers increase, and finally an assured, unstoppable Superman fighting on the grandest cosmic scale possible against the same old bullies. It gives him a true character arc without undermining his essential Superman-ness, and by the end it’s a contender for the title of the biggest Superman story of all.

Recommendations: Outside of this, Greg Pak’s runs on Action Comics and Batman/Superman, and Tom Taylor/Robson Rocha’s 3-issue Batman/Superman stint, as well as Scott Snyder, Jim Lee and Dustin Nguyen’s blockbuster mini Superman Unchained, are the best of the New 52 era. If you’re looking for more wild cosmic Superman adventure stories, Grant Morrison’s Superman Beyond is a beautiful two-part adventure (it ties in to his event comic Final Crisis but largely works standalone), and Joe Casey’s Mr. Majestic was a largely great set of often trippy cosmic-scale adventure comics with its Superman-esque lead. For something a little more gonzo, maybe try the hilariously bizarre Coming of the Supermen by Neal Adams. And while his role in it is relatively minor, if we’re talking cosmic Superman-related epics, Jack Kirby’s Fourth World has to be mentioned - it’ll soon be reissued in omnibus format to coincide with the Justice League movie, since many of its concepts made it in there.

9. Superman: Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?

What: More than just the title story, DC issued a collection of all three of Watchmen writer Alan Moore’s Superman stories: For The Man Who Has Everything, where Superman finds himself trapped in his idea of his ideal life while Batman, Wonder Woman and Robin are in deadly danger in the real world, Jungle Line, where a deliriously ill and seemingly terminal Superman finds help in the most unexpected place, and Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?, Moore’s version of the final Superman story.

Why: Dark Superman stories are a tricky tightrope to walk - go too far and you invalidate the core his world is built around - but Moore’s pretty dang good at his job. Whatever Happened you should wait to read until you’ve checked out some Superman stories from the 1960s first since it’s very much meant as a contrast to those, but For The Man Who Has Everything is an interesting look at Superman’s basic alienation (especially in regards to his characterization in that period of his publication history) with a gangbuster final fight, and Jungle Line is a phenomenal Superman horror story that uncovers some of his rawest, most deeply buried fears.

Recommendations: There are precious few other dark Superman stories that can be considered any real successes outside a few mentioned among other recommendations; the closest I can think of is Superman: For Tomorrow, which poses some interesting questions framed by gorgeous art, but has a reach tremendously exceeding its grasp. Among similar characters though, there are some real winners; Moore’s own time on Miracleman was one of the first and still one of the most effective looks at what it would mean for a Superman-like being to exist in the real world, and the seminal novel Superfolks, while in many ways of its time, was tremendously and deservedly influential on generations of creators. Moore had another crack at the end of a Superman-like figure in his Majestic one-shot, and the Change or Die arc of Warren Ellis’ run on Stormwatch (all of which is worth reading) presented a powerful, bittersweet look at a superman’s attempt at truly changing the world for the better.

10. All-Star Superman

What: Superman rescues the first manned mission to the sun, sabotaged by Lex Luthor. His powers have reached greater heights than ever from the solar overexposure, but it’s more than his cells can handle: he’s dying, and Lex has won at last. This is what Superman does with his last year of life.

Why: I put this at the bottom since it works better the more you like Superman, but if you’re only going to read one story on this list, this one has to be it. It’s one of the best superhero stories period, and it’s everything that’s wistful and playful and sad and magical and wonderful about Superman in one book.

Recommendations: If you’re interested in the other great “Death of Superman” story, skip the 90s book and go to co-creator Jerry Siegel and Curt Swan’s 60s ‘Imaginary Story’, also one of the best Superman stories ever, and particularly one of Luthor’s best showings. If you got a kick out of the utopian ‘Superman fixes everything’ feel of a lot of it, try The Amazing Story of Superman-Red and Superman-Blue! The current Supergirl title by Steve Orlando seems to be trying to operate on a pretty similar wavelength, and is definitely the best thing coming out of the Superman family of books right now. The recent Adventures of Superman anthology series has a number of creators try and do their own ‘definitive’ Superman stories, often to great results. And Avengers 34.1 starring Hyperion by Al Ewing and Dale Keown taps into All-Star’s sense of an elevated alien perspective paired with a deep well of humanity to different but still moving results.

  • Me: *takes a deep breath*
  • Me: I lo-
  • Anyone who has spent five seconds around me ever: yes, you love Jason Todd, we know, you love Jason Todd so much, he's the light of your life, you love him so much, you just love Jason Todd, we KNOW, you love Jason Todd you fucking love Jason Todd ok we know, we get it, YOU LOVE JASON TODD. WE GET IT.
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FT Angst week Day 4: Bleeding Out/Bandages

But in a sick twist of fate, Lucy Heartfilia did not last long because of extreme magical exhaustion. She developed the same sickness as her mother and passed away in just a year.

Natsu Dragneel now carries two guild marks, one on his right shoulder and another on his right hand.  He proclaims that he could still feel Lucy’s presence whenever he is travelling. He could also smell her scent whenever he gets his motion sickness and he could feel her touch whenever he misses her.

But even if the original team is lacking one member, he believes that it’s just the start of their never-ending adventure. He just needs to do it for her in the meantime before she meets her again someday.

“You better treat me to a lot of food up there, Lucy. You sooo owe me for this.”


i did this in a day and i’m sick omg *wheezes* 

the beginning of wolfstar

- so i have this headcanon that sirius and remus felt differently about each other than they did about james and peter right off the bat
- like remus didn’t always know he was bisexual, and sirius didn’t always know he was gay
- but sirius still would exuberantly go off on how this conquest was better than that one and how that conquest was so easy a baby could have done it, and he never bragged about it to remus bc he thought it was because he knew he would disapprove
- sirius and james were Those Jerks™ at school that people either hated or loved, and remus was always telling them off about it and peter was always rolling his eyes and sirius despised it when it happened bc he didn’t like disappointing moony
- (also, they were immature schoolboys in what, the 1970s? let’s be real, homophobia was rampant and ingrained in almost everyone, and being gay was something of a dirty little secret, something you should be ashamed of)
- (and i would not be surprised if james and peter and even sirius and remus were a little bit like that too)
- we all know that remus figured it out first, despite being a marauder he was more levelheaded than the others, and his realization that he might be gay came about sometime in fourth year when he ambled into the quidditch changing room after a match to wait for james and was met with a whole slew of attractive boys in various stages of undress
- remus can’t look james in the eye for a week after that
- and about two and a half weeks after the Changing Room Incident, as he’s taken to calling it in his head, he breaks up with his girlfriend of eight months saying he wanted to pay more attention to his OWLs
- and he is so ashamed of himself
- he spends hours in the shower, trying to scrub ‘it’ off him, and makes more of an effort than ever to see girls
- but he feels the same way about them as he does boys? and he’s so confused, bc if he felt the same way about both boys and girls, didn’t that mean he had to choose?
- he wants to choose girls really badly, doesn’t mind softness and curves and long, long hair, but he finds himself unsatisfied with it
- and sirius always notices remus, like he notices the way his freckles are scattered across his nose, his cheekbones, his shoulders, his arms; he notices the way his hair looks when the light shines on it; he sees that his trousers are too short and that he bites his lip when he studies and he knows that remus can’t bear the way his fringe falls into his eyes when he’s reading but can’t be bothered to cut it
- and he didn’t know any of that about james or peter, and he didn’t care
- his brother in arms was james potter, everyone knew that, but he never waited in the hospital wing all night when james was injured, he never took notes for james when he knew he was physically unable to, he never raided the kitchen looking for chocolate for james, never fell asleep on top of james ever
- but he did for remus
- always had
- and one day, after a particularly bad full moon, peter points out that sirius is always mopey when remus is mopey and that he never behaves like that with james or him
- sirius is hit with an Existential Crisis™
- and maybe one day sitting in the common room late at night pretending to do his homework but really staring across the table at moony’s hair falling into his eyes, sirius lets himself, so very hesitantly, wonder what it would be like to play with it
- and it continues from there, for a year and then another, and it’s when sirius returns from a summer with james that felt exceptionally hollow does he stop dead in his tracks when he sees remus
- and he catches his breath
- because he isn’t different at all, no, he’s just realized that the empty feeling inside him suddenly dissipated, and he really just wants to hug moony
- and remus has missed his friends, james and sirius and peter, but he’s missed studying with sirius (yes, sometimes they actually get work done), and having padfoot’s heavy weight across his feet during a bad night, and watching sirius wear his cardigans to bed during cold winter nights
- he privately thinks when he goes home that he’s got too many of them, now that most of the cardigans are actually in his closet and not sirius’
- that night, after the great hall, and the feast, and loudly celebrating the beginning of their last year together with the rest of the boys, remus slinks down to the common room, sits in front of the fire with a blanket and just closes his eyes
- a few minutes later, sirius quietly joins him, talking under his breath
- he talks under his breath a lot more often now, and used to do it when he was little too, except orion and walburga black didn’t think it was a pureblood trait and beat it out of him
- well, almost beat it out of him
- and he’s nearly drifted off to sleep when sirius says something and he snaps to attention almost comically, staring slack-jawed at him
- sirius’ entire face is red, and he’s blushing so hard remus thinks maybe he didn’t mean to say it out loud, or at least, loud enough for him to hear
- and the stammering apologies that begin almost instantaneously confirm his suspicion, and remus sees that he’s shrinking into himself again, the way he knows is sirius trying to minimize the verbal and physical abuse that will land on his shoulders
- he hasn’t seen his parents in over a year, but he’ll never break his habit of flinching every time someone is aggressive towards him, or when he thinks someone is about to be
- and remus is shaking his head immediately, telling him that’s it’s all right, it’s okay and as he moves forward, sirius’ back slams into the other end of the large sofa
- he stops for a second, and then crosses the sofa again, much slower this time, so he doesn’t scare him again, and kisses him
- lightly, he meant it to be reassuring, even though his heart was hammering so loud he was surprised it hadn’t beat out of his chest yet
- and he honestly thought it would when, almost six minutes later, sirius reached across the sofa and kissed him back

  • Jeonghan: *Crashing into bed* Oof! I'm exhausted!
  • S.Coups: I'm so glad it's Friday!
  • Jeonghan: I'm going to sleep like a log.
  • S.Coups: You and me both.
  • Jeonghan: *Turns out the light* Of course, Woozi will be up at 6.
  • S.Coups: I promised DK that I'd make pancakes for breakfast.
  • Jeonghan: Oh and Performance unit has practice at eight.
  • S.Coups: But first we have that company meeting tomorrow.
  • [Both groan in unison]
  • Jeonghan: Well let's just get as much rest as we can.
  • S.Coups: *Yawns* Way ahead of you!
  • Mingyu, trying to get S.Coups attention: Coups my poop is blue!