the report card

anonymous asked:

When I was in middle school, my social teacher came in the drama room during drama to boast about how he finished his marking first (for the year, normally my drama teacher has it done first but he changed some marks of her kids so she had to redo it for report cards) so she set us on him and we circled him chanting "circle of death" and a bunch of other stuff and Drama was so weird because no one ever questioned anything. Ever.

anonymous asked:

can you do headcanons on the gang in middle school pls? I LOVE AND YOUR BLOG YOURE A GREAT WRITER <333

I love this idea!!

Ponyboy
Super angsty during middle school and couldn’t stand 99% of his classmates. He was convinced they were all idiots and that they just didn’t ‘understand’ things as well as he did. He was quiet and not many people talked to him, but middle school was also the year he discovered his love for track and he made lots of friends through that. 

Soda
He was actually pretty popular and drew a lot of attention to himself by joking around all of the time, but he struggled with the school work a lot. He was extremely embarrassed over the grades that he got and would usually stay home sick on report card day. The students loved him, but the teachers thought he was lazy and didn’t try hard enough and it really made him feel awful. 

Darry
He had braces and glasses during middle school and although he was self-conscious about it, no ever really said anything. He was the tallest in his class and the best athlete at his middle school, so he was pretty well respected. Despite being fairly popular, he found it really hard to talk to girls and was sort of peer pressured into his first kiss, which he really regrets.

Two-bit
Surprisingly a little quieter back when he was in middle-school and was more of the silent prankster type. He would constantly mess with his teachers without them even realizing it was him and his classmates thought he was a hero for it. He really struggled with paying attention though and his mom would have to sit with him and force him to get his homework done. 

Steve
Always right next to Soda and joking around. He was typically the mastermind behind the majority of the jokes and pranks and usually teams with Two-bit for their execution. He was a star student in his Tech class but he’d usually end up mouthing off to his teacher because he couldn’t stand being told what to do with mechanics. Also purposely would give himself detentions so he wouldn’t have to go home and deal with his father.

Dally

He went to school for the first month of grade 7 and then just stopped showing up. He spent some time going back and forth between living with his aunt and his grandparents and even spent a short while in California. Life was too chaotic to focus on school and he was too moody and violent for any adult to force him to go.

Johnny
Stayed in the shadow’s for the most part, a lot of his teachers didn’t even know his name and he would get marked absent even when he was in class. Being in a classroom made him feel trapped and the teachers made him feel stupid so he didn’t go a whole lot, and his parents sure as hell didn’t care if he did or didn’t. He spent a lot of his time smoking weed at the lot or looking for spare change by the phone booths. He’s not really sure how or why he graduated but he hated middle school more than anything so he’s glad he did. 

This conversation happened like every two weeks in high school
  • Rich friend: just use your allowance!
  • Me: my wot
  • Rich friend: the money your parents give you?
  • Me: the wot my wot give wot
  • Rich friend: for doing chores?
  • Me: that doesn't happen
  • Rich friend: so what do you get for doing chores?
  • Me: not grounded?
  • Rich friend: you just do chores for free?
  • Me: yeah I mean my parents don't charge me for food but
  • Rich friends: plus I get money for good grades, $50 for each A, $40 for each B, $30 for each C, and $20 for each D. What do you get for a good report card?
  • Me: I get a good report card
  • Rich friend: so what do you do if you want to buy something?
  • Me: I ask my parents
  • Rich friend: and they just get it for you?
  • Me: no
  • Rich friend: so how do you get it??
  • Me: I don't
  • Rich friend: haha wow! Anyway what kind of brand new car are your parents getting you for your 16th birthday
the no bullshit guide to getting your shit together: for the lazy student

Let’s be honest: time management and organization? They’re really hard. Sure, at first you might feel like you’ve gotten the hang of them, that you’re in control of your life. But how often have you fallen off the wagon? Procrastinated on one thing and the next moment, you’re behind in all your classes? I know that sometimes laziness feels like a part of who you are, but honestly, fuck that. Do you really want to give up your success for the disinterest of a moment?

If your answer is no (it better be no, or you really need to get your priorities straight), let’s get to it. 

STEP ONE: BE HONEST WITH YOURSELF

“This class doesn’t even matter.” “I don’t care about my grades.” “I can finish this the day before.” Sound familiar? You might feel great now, but when you’re staring down at your report card later, it’ll feel like you just got punched. 

This is a cliche, but the greatest obstacle to your success is yourself - especially the lies you tell yourself! Sit yourself down and be honest about what you need to improve on. Be as blunt as you can, but for god’s sake, don’t throw yourself a pity party! There’s no use agonizing over what you can’t change. Instead, set realistic, achievable goals, and make a game plan. Struggling with math? Go to extra help. Behind in all your classes? Stay in for a couple nights and actually work. 

STEP TWO: STOP WITH THE FANCY SHIT

Now you know what your goals are, but maybe you want some inspiration, so you log on to tumblr and are instantly bombarded by all these beautiful, well lit shots of the most gorgeous bullet journals, planners, and notes. Impressive, right? Well, I’m gonna let you in on a little secret: they’re all useless! A simple phone planner works just as well, if not better, than a fancy agenda, because you’ll always have it on you, it’s not a hassle to carry around, and you don’t feel obligated to make it look pretty. 

Riddle me this, where are you going to find all this extra motivation to keep prettying up your bullet journal? To write all your notes in perfect, colour coded printing? There aren’t many times in life where taking the easy was out will actually benefit you, so take advantage! Stop wasting your time; get a phone planner and write your notes in your natural goddamn handwriting. 

STEP THREE: CLEAN YOUR ROOM

Yep, your entire room - not just your study space! This one can be put on the back burner for a bit if you’re on a really pressing deadline, but I wouldn’t recommend it. I’m notoriously messy, and if I don’t watch myself, I’d find myself in dirty-laundry-and-old-notes hell. A little bit of organized chaos is fine, I even encourage it! But try working when your desk is covered in mounds of paper and you have nowhere to put your laptop – it’s just not conducive to success. 

Keeping your entire room clean is a way to stave off stress, frustration, and even embarrassment, because nobody wants to show potential roommates how much of a mess they are. 

STEP FOUR: ACTUALLY WORK

Yeah, I know what you’re thinking: “actually work? Who does this girl think she is?” I’d probably think the same thing, except I’ve learned the valuable lesson of sucking it the hell up, and you will too. When you get home from work, grab a snack and work. When you have a free period, figure out what’s due and work. Stop reasoning yourself out of work: you’re not going to finish this later, and that will be on the test. There’s really not much to say about this one, because it’s the step that requires the most raw effort, and you’re really only going to find that within yourself. Tell yourself what’s at stake, and realize that, by setting the standard for your mediocrity now, you’re potentially trapping yourself in a cycle that will last for years. 

STEP FIVE: CUT YOURSELF SOME SLACK

Maybe you’ve been on top of your shit for a day, a week, or even a month, and that’s really great. But then… you fail. You miss a deadline or you bomb a test. So what do you do now? Do you allow yourself to fall back into your old habits? Fuck no! Everyone fails, even that studyblr with those perfect bullet journal photos and a perpetually clean study space. I’m going to tell you something that’ll sound really strange: you should value your failures, especially if you worked hard to avoid them. What?! Be HAPPY about failing when I actually TRIED? Yeah, you heard me right. If you don’t know how to handle failure, then when you inevitably experience it, your reaction will be much worse. 

Failing hurts, and boy, I know how embarrassing it can be. But learning how to deal with failure, and especially how to keep trying after it happens, is an invaluable lesson. 

STEP SIX: TREAT. YO. SELF.

Disclaimer: I’m not suggesting you treat yourself after the most basic of tasks, because please. Treat yourself when you know you goddamn well deserve it. Remember that “all work and no play makes jack a dull boy.” If all you do is study and do your homework, then, pardon my french, your life sucks. If you don’t have friends, play a video game! Eat an entire jumbo chocolate bar! Indulge in whatever the fuck you want, you deserve it. I’m someone that has trouble prioritizing future benefits over immediate gratification, so by allowing myself little pleasures, I save myself from crashing and burning. 

Hope these tips helped, but remember to take them with a grain of salt - you’re you and I’m me, and different things work for different people. Good luck!

You know, I feel like A:tLA really found a way to resonate with the struggles that a lot of kids face.

Aang is the struggle of the “gifted child”. He’s told from a young age that he’s going to do incredible things that puts him under a lot of pressure until he finally pulls off the ultimate procrastination trying to avoid the stress. He shows a lot of talent in what he’s good at, but when he tries learning something he’s not immediately good at he is easily discouraged. He’s also almost paralyzed by the fear of failing. (To be fair, the stakes are very high in his case).

Katara is the child with all of the talent she could ever need, but none of the opportunity. She has a real natural talent for waterbending, but no place at home where she can get training to develop the talent. It reminds me of kids from my school who were extremely talented in theatre, but couldn’t afford to participate after they instated the $200 “pay to participate” rules on extracurriculars.

Toph is the child with plenty of talent, but physical limitations that she has to go beyond. She has to prove that she is twice as good to get the same respect (and boy does she ever)! And she has to balance making sure that no one treats her disability as her defining characteristic, while still making sure it’s accounted for. Her parents would have let her blindness rule her life and she had to fight just to get the chance to show her talents.

Sokka is like the kid with lots of talent, but in an area that’s not very valued. At least not when compared to the benders. Like the kid who draws incredible comics in their notebooks, but is looked down on because they just can’t get an A on their report cards. Or the kid who is a talented pianist that everyone asks about getting prepared for a “real career” while the kids on the football team are being told to watch for recruiters.

That’s just the Gaang, but you could keep doing this with so many characters (I mean, everything about Zuko!), but I’m just really grateful that even in this fantastic setting there were a lot of things people could identify with.

Since it’s finals season here’s to the people that:

- try and get D’s and F’s still
- failed a class or classes this semester
- didn’t get into the college they wanted
- struggle with learning disabilities
- couldn’t get scholarships due to a low gpa
- have mental illnesses that zap their motivation to do anything else besides make it through the day
- have to take summer school
- weren’t able to graduate

You are not an idiot. You do have worth. And you CAN still go places in life. Your report card does not define your worth as a person.

Take care 💛

5

They say that people come into our lives for a reason, to help us live and grow, and we help them in return. I’m not sure if it’s true, but whatever way our stories end, even if we never meet again, I’ll cherish the memories we had and keep them close to my heart. My story wouldn’t be the same without you.

Does anyone remember Artemis Fowl’s report card from Saint Bartleby’s School for Young Gentleman? That one day he answered all of his professor’s questions correctly and the next day he answered all of them wrongly, telling the professor that it was the chaos theory and Artemis was only preparing him for the real world lmao

When people tell stories about how their parents beat them, it’s always interesting to see their face change because they expected me to say “me too lol” but I instead say “I’m really sorry. You didn’t deserve that”
Last time a co worker who also has West Indian parents was telling me in a joking way how he remembers being beaten with a belt because lied about his report card. As he was laughing it off and saying he deserved it, I just said “wow that’s awful hun. You didn’t deserve that.” And his whole face changed. Like it hadn’t occurred to him that it’s messed up that a part of remembering his childhood is remembering how badly it hurt to be beaten so badly at such a young age.
Another time I had a friend, non West Indian parents, who talked about how she made a mess on a dress that her parents got her. It was really expensive apparently and she spilled red juice on it. She talked about how she was ordered to take the dress of and was beaten with a belt too without any clothes on. And she was laughing and said “I was a bad ass kid lol” and I said “no hun you were just a kid”. And she looked at me and immediately stopped laughing and just sat there like “yea…I was just a kid. I don’t know why they did that to me”
My mom was raised in a household where she was beaten so badly….I just don’t understand how she is so loving now growing up in a home where she got so little love. They called it discipline, but once she became a social worker she began to see that it was abuse. That she grew up terrified of her parents, although they thought it was respect that my mom felt. It was fear.
We have to get comfortable challenging what is often seen as cultural norms. We have to be a generation of people who are not ashamed to say “I would never beat my child”.

migumiglorious replied to your post “You mentioned in your tags on your post that you are in the upswing of…”

Oh my god “try harder” is what all my teachers and counselor told me for the four year duration of middle school whenever I said I didn’t understand the material in class or when I said I couldn’t focus and it was h e l l. Honestly I think teachers say that cause they think students are lying, so that they can go “Oh I did my job I didn’t ignore them” when in reality they’re still doing that. I get close to flipping my shit every time I hear someone say it now.

Try harder has been my mantra through all of my childhood right the way through to my adult years. Try harder. 

Like honestly the whole time I was at university I was having a perpetual meltdown, there was no way I could have possibly tried harder. I graduated with a 2:1 with honors (I have no idea how to translate that for the Americans, sorry, it’s pretty good though, like not 4.0 good but Up There) and the first thing my professor said to me, with a big ole smile on his face was “now imagine what you could have done if you’d just tried harder” and all I could hear after that was the Kill Bill siren in my head. Like I’d just coasted my way there, and hand’t spent four years torturing myself, crying daily and completely destroying my personal life to try and keep it together long enough to reach graduation day.

And that’s a summary of my entire school life right there, with report cards that say “Joy is extremely clever but just doesn’t try hard enough”, “could be wonderful, if she only tried harder.” And it took until last year when I was joking with @jeneelestrange that it’s odd that I know all the things that I know because I’m not all that clever, and haha isn’t it funny that I’m able to remember these things despite this this and this, and there was this moment of pause which you could hear even over the internet before Jenee very gently nudged me with “hey…uh…that uh…that’s a learning disorder, you have a learning disorder” and I went haha no I just don’t try hard enough, I’m just not all that clever…right? I’m just stupid, right? Why else do I struggle so much with academic things…

Wait, what do you mean ADHD gets overlooked in girls because it presents differently than in boys? What?! What do they mean it’s hard?!?! WELL WHY DON’T THEY TRY HARDER?!!

Astrology Milestones

Age 12 - First Jupiter Return: The ancients celebrated puberty because the biological God and Goddess of creation had been awakened and it was a sacred time in one’s life. This was recognised with jubilance and honour. Jupiter rules hormones and cultural conditioning. In modern times we shame and denigrate the phase, remarking on hormonal changes that inconvenience society, and yet we wonder why teenagers self destruct, rebel, and turn to substance. This changing biology transforms the lower body and activates the spirit, and yet we are not prepared or nurtured for this powerful change. 

Age 14 - Jupiter opposes Saturn: The resistance to authority and conditioning is activated here, along with self consciousness and the lure into danger. This is the moment a young person can typically choose between ‘indulgence, laziness, and self pleasure’ (Jupiter) in leaving school or ‘responsibility, expectation, and conforming to authority’ (Saturn) in remaining in school or focusing on the future. The karmic lesson is revealed around this period. We face intimidating figures of authority, often threatening with ‘what until you’re in the real world’ shaking confidence even more 

Age 21 - Uranus squares natal Uranus: 21 is the age globally recognised as completed transition into adulthood. This period indicates self expression and experimentation, a time for tattoos and lilac hair and inspiration. It’s a favourable time for sparking people’s interest in astrology. Political activity, protest, and rebellion can begin around here. Cosmically, this is a time where people learn a lot about themselves and generate good self awareness, they start to feel wholly in their body, or as if fogginess has dissolved 

Age 28-30 - First Saturn Return: Everything you have built until this point is under threat. Saturn writes his first report card, and it will rely on how intimate and satisfactory you have been in facilitating Saturn’s condition in the natal chart. This is the biggest overhaul we experience on a physical/mental level, when the anchor of the chart completes transit and writes a new criteria. We are given 29 years because the reading material and substance is so profound. Harsh reality hits with shattering force. It’s time to become an adult. 

-C.

Top 10 Things I Wish I Could Put on the Comment Section of Report Cards

1.  Sleeps in class
2.  Literally stares into space the whole period
3.  Is under the impression physical attendance equals an automatic pass
4.  Mumbles, then complains the teacher doesn’t understand them
5.  Doesn’t understand what “put your phone away” means
6.  Comes to class stoned most of the time
7.  Makes a mess; never cleans after themselves
8.  Needs to shower… with soap
9.  Doesn’t understand what respect actually entails
10. Not nearly as intelligent as you believe

Bonus - Your child is turning me into an alcoholic