the public library of new york

theverge.com
The New York Public Library just uploaded nearly 200,000 images you can use for free
The New York Public Library just released a treasure trove of digitized public domain images, everything from epic poetry from the 11th century to photographs of used car lots in Columbus, Ohio from the 1930s.
By Andrew J . Hawkins

Over 180,000 manuscripts, maps, photographs, sheet music, lithographs, postcards, and other images were released online Wednesday in incredibly high resolution, and are available to download using the library’s user-friendly visualization tool. It’s a nostalgist’s dream come true.

10

Stapleton Library in Staten Island

In the words of the architects Andrew Berman Architect:

The New York Public Library commissioned this branch library of 12,000 square feet. We restored the existing 1907 Carrere and Hastings Carnegie Library and designed a new 7,000 square foot building to be located alongside. The library is conceived as a modern public institution that will contribute to the revitalization of the Stapleton neighborhood.

The facility is an assemblage of old and new. The existing Carnegie Library was converted into the Childrens’ Reading Room. The new building, constructed of glue laminated Douglas fir posts, beams, joists and roof decking, houses books and media. The structurally glazed facade invites the public and supplies natural light. The exposed wood structure provides a sense of rhythm, scale and material richness unexpected in contemporary public buildings.

Follow the Source Link for images sources and more information.

3

Jessie Willcox Smith (September 6, 1863 – May 3, 1935)

A prominent female illustrator in the United States during the Golden Age of American illustration and “one of the greatest pure illustrators”. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: Illustrations from The Seven Ages of Childhood. Pictures by Jessie Willcox Smith. Verses by Carolyn Wells. New York: Moffat, Yard and Company, 1909.

Animated stereoview portrait of a family in a house near Newport, Rhode Island, c. 1850’s/1860’s.

Source: New York Public Library.

Women’s rights, Standing Rock protests planned in major US cities this weekend

New York City

Rally for a #FairWorkWeek and Fast Food Worker Empowerment
Friday, March 3, 2017, 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Eastern, City Hall

“Everyone needs to plan their time to balance work, family and education. But last minute scheduling practices endemic in the fast food industry prevent fast food workers from planning theirs. It’s time for a #FairWorkWeek NOW! They also need the ability to form their own nonprofit organization to fight for their rights and improve their communities.”

People’s March for Education Justice
Saturday, March 4, 2017, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Eastern, Trump International Hotel

“As we continue to defend public education from federal attacks by Donald Trump and Betsy DeVos, we march to defend [education] here in New York from Governor Andrew Cuomo. The public investment he proposes in his education budget this year is woefully inadequate and falls way short of being equitable. … Black, brown, immigrant, refugee, low-income, LGBTQIA, English language learners, homeless students and students with disabilities are worthy of an investment that will meet their needs not deny them opportunities to be successful.”

NY March 4 Trump Rally
Saturday, March 4, 2017, 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., Trump Tower, 725 5th Avenue

“This is a Pro America rally in support of our President and to show our American pride. Wear your USA and Trump gear. Bring your American flags, signs and pride. This will be a peaceful rally. See you there!”

Real New Yorkers Don’t - “March 4 Trump”
Saturday, March 4, 2017, 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern, 53rd Street and 5th Avenue

“Donald Trump was scheduled to return to NYC for the first time since the inauguration; but of course he chickened out, knowing that we prefer New York City WITHOUT HIM! We are certain that his absence will not stop the trumpalumpas from continuing with their March 4 Trump rally in support of him this Saturday, so we still want to make a strong showing in a counter protest at Trump Tower.”

March 4th for Standing Rock
Saturday, March 4, 2017, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern, New York Public Library, 42nd Street and 5th Avenue

“Six days before the national Rise with Standing Rock mobilization in Washington, D.C., march on Trump Tower (on 5th avenue) to protest the Dakota Access pipeline and its threat to the Standing Rock Sioux, their sacred lands and clean water.”

Print Organize Protest
Sunday, March 5, 2017, Shoestring Press, 663 Classon Avenue, Brooklyn

“Print Organize Protest is a nationwide campaign where print shops work with local artists to open their doors and invite the community in to print clothing and signs of resistance. We are a network of artists and printers committed to creating social change through art in our communities.”

Washington, D.C.

Event to Protest Trump at Russian Embassy
Saturday, March 4, 2017, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Eastern, Embassy of Russia, 2650 Wisconsin Ave NW

“Please come to our peaceful, issue-focused protest of Trump-Russia covert collaboration. We’ll protest outside the Russian Embassy in Washington, D.C. — a location sure to generate press coverage.”

Chicago

Print Organize Protest
Sunday, March 5, 2017, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Central, Chicago Printmakers Collaborative, 4912 N. Western Avenue

“Print Organize Protest is a nationwide campaign where print shops work with local artists to open their doors and invite the community in to print clothing and signs of resistance. We are a network of artists and printers committed to creating social change through art in our communities.”

Los Angeles 

International Women’s Day March 2017
Sunday, March 5, 2017, 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Pacific, Los Angeles Police Department headquarters, 100 W. 1st Street

“This march is convened and led by transnational/women of color, but all people are welcome to join!”

San Francisco

Print Organize Protest
Sunday, March 5, 2017, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Pacific, the Women’s Building, 3543 18th Street, #8

“Print Organize Protest is a nationwide campaign where print shops work with local artists to open their doors and invite the community in to print clothing and signs of resistance. We are a network of artists and printers committed to creating social change through art in our communities.”

Read more (3/3/17 9 AM)

10

Albrecht Dürer (21 May 1471 – 6 April 1528)

Painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance. (Wikipedia)

From our stacks: Illustrations from The Complete Woodcuts of Albrecht Dürer. Edited by Dr. Willi Kurth. New York: Arden Book Co., n.d. 

John Lewis (May 3, 1920 – March 29, 2001) 

American jazz pianist, composer and arranger, best known as the founder and musical director of the Modern Jazz Quartet.

Portrait of musician John Lewis, at the piano. Printed on front: “John Lewis. Personal management, Monte Kay, 200 West 57th St., New York, N.Y.” Handwritten on back: “Lewis, John.”

  • Courtesy of the E. Azalia Hackley Collection of African Americans in the Performing Arts, Detroit Public Library

Tesla spent much of his adult life living in New York City, where he lived out of a small hotel room – because getting someone else to change his sheets gave him more time to science (also, people like Edison kept him quite poor). At the stroke of midnight, he would walk down to the New York Public Library, and feed the multitudes of pigeons waiting for him. But when this arrangement became unfeasible (or he just felt lazy), he would simply fling open the windows of whatever hotel was staying at, fling seed around the room, and invite the birds inside.

Unsurprisingly, the hotels didn’t like this. His devotion to his pigeons cost Tesla tenancy at the St. Regis, the Hotel Pennsylvania, and the Hotel Governor Clinton. 

Towards the end of his life, Tesla retreated more and more into his homeless lady shtick. After he was knocked down by a taxi and rendered unable to walk, he was so afraid that his beloved pigeons would go hungry he would dispatch Western Union couriers to his usual haunt to dump out his birdseed, continually haranguing them by telephone until it was done.

It gets a lot sadder when you learn that Tesla actually fell in love with one of these birds, a beautiful all-white specimen that could, allegedly, find him wherever he was in the city. That’s not us being hyperbolic when we talk about love, either. As he described it, “I loved that pigeon as a man loves a woman, and she loved me. As long as I had her, there was a purpose to my life.” When the bird became sick, Tesla stopped going to work at his lab just to tend to her. And when she died, he lost all will to live, even turning his back on his scientific pursuits.

6 Famous People From History (And Their Totally WTF Hobbies)