the protester

5

Charleena Lyles was a “powerful lady” — until she faced Seattle’s flawed criminal justice system

  • Charleena Lyles’ younger brother, Domico Jones, has an endearing nickname for his sister: “String bean Leen.”
  • The 30-year-old mother’s physical build and her documented history of mental illness made the circumstances of her shooting death by Seattle police on Sunday all the more confusing to the family. 
  • How could the officers who killed Lyles see her as a threat after she’d called 911 to report a burglary at her apartment, the family wondered. 
  • The petite and reportedly pregnant woman, whose mental illness was known to Seattle police, experienced homelessness and was a victim of domestic violence during her short life.
  • In Seattle, Lyles’ death puts her at the intersection of several social justice issues. Excessive uses of force by officers, the over-reliance on prisons and jails to deal with women who experience mental health instabilities and a lack of adequate treatment are among the most persistent problems, advocates say. 
  • For nearly five years, Seattle has tried to address some of these issues — the city is under a federal order to retrain its police force and address a pattern of brutality against subjects who exhibit serious psychological distress. 
  • But Lyles’ case suggests these efforts are falling short, as have similar efforts in criminal justice systems around the country. Read more. (6/24/17, 8:41 AM)

California, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and Louisiana are drafting laws to limit protests on college campuses

  • Wisconsin is inching closer to enacting a law that would allow universities to expel students for protesting.
  • The State Assembly passed the Campus Free Speech Act in a 61-36 vote Wednesday night in an attempt to protect First Amendment rights at Wisconsin’s public colleges and universities. 
  • Under the law, students who are found guilty of engaging in “dangerous or other disorderly conduct” at speeches or events on campus on two occasions would be suspended for a minimum of one semester. 
  • Those with three allegations of disrupting free speech would be expelled.
  • Supporters of the Campus Free Speech Act allege that the bill protects the First Amendment rights of guest speakers, but critics argue that such a law would infringe upon the protesters’ right to free speech. However, bill sponsor Rep. Jesse Kremer said this isn’t the case. Read more (6/23/17)

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

  • Several months after a youth football team in Texas faced death threats on social media and retaliation from its league for kneeling during the United States’ national anthem, a coalition of NFL players has stepped up to help the squad rebuild.
  • According to ESPN, Devin McCourty of the New England Patriots, Malcolm Jenkins and Torrey Smith of the Philadelphia Eagles and free agent wide receiver Anquan Boldin have donated a combined $20,000 to fund the inaugural season of the Southeast Texas Oilers, a team made up of former members of the Beaumont Bulls who left the organization after their 2016 protest. Read more. (6/23/17, 7:51 PM)

why don’t we talk about thousands of people all over the country protesting in russia today? they’re protesting against medvedev and putin’s corruption (for the second time this year, because they still didn’t get the answers). they’re tired. they just want to see their country free from these toxic people. they want to live in a happy country.

they want answers

they are not their government

(russian constitution - she died for your sins)

hey, tumblr, why don’t we talk about this for a while?

Everyone going on about how Trump has had his “Watergate moment” forgets that Watergate wasn’t a moment. The criminal activity began in early 1972. Nixon resigned on August 8, 1974. In between was a daily grind of reporting and protests and people going on with their lives – none of which benefited from panicky overreactions about how the nation was doomed. So buckle in for the long haul. Whatever comes from recent exhausting events, and all the exhausting events of the future, it’s unlikely to happen overnight.

But social media doesn’t thrive on people quietly grinding through their days. It thrives on alarmism, on making every day sound like the most elaborate and shocking episode yet in the soap opera that is reality. And that depresses people because if you gaze too long into the abyss, the abyss asks Mike Huckabee to tell you a shitty “joke.”

Constant outrage and fear are not healthy. It makes people stressed, tired, and sad. And it makes people wonder when something will be done. Well, things have been done. But you aren’t being given a chance to savor them because other people are constantly yelling at you about how today’s new development is definitely the one that changes history forever and anyone who believes otherwise is a traitor. So let’s pause for a moment and take stock.

Your Anti-Trump Efforts Are Working

5

After being told they can’t wear shorts in the summer, these boys showed up to school in skirts

  • At Isca Academy in Exeter, England, the boys have had it. It’s hot. Their uniforms, with their long pants, are stuffy. They want relief but they can’t wear shorts. What’s a boy to do?
  • For these students, the answer was obvious: Wear skirts. On Thursday, dozens of boys at Isca Academy arrived with skirts over their shorts to make a point about the inherent double standard in their own dress code. Read more. (6/22/17, 11:58 AM)