the prison industry

6

This is exactly what Coretta Scott King warned congress about in 1986.

Jeff Sessions will fear-monger and stoke anti-Blackness by using everything from casual racism to deeply racist stereotypes, to justify the mass incarceration of Black people for non-violent, victimless “crimes” like marijuana usage.

The Trump Administration is in full White Supremacy mode.

Black LBGTQ History Icons

Marsha P. Johnson

  • A leader of the Stonewall Riots. According to several eyewitnesses, Marsha was the one who “really started it”. She was “in the middle of the whole thing, screaming and yelling and throwing rocks and almost like Molly Pitcher in the Revolution or something”
  • Dedicated her life to activism:
    • Co-founded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (later renamed Street Transgender Action Revolutionaries)
    • Ensured that the young drag queens, trans women and other street kids on Christopher Street were fed and clothed. Marsha also housed them whenever she could. 
    • In the 1980s, she was an activist and organizer in ACT UP. 

Stormé DeLarverie

  • Also a leader in the Stonewall Riots - has been identified as the “butch lesbian that threw the first punch” against the police officers.
  • Several eye-witnesses recollections also recognize her as the cross-dressing lesbian that yelled “why don’t you guys do something” at the bystanders that evoked the reaction from them that helped make Stonewall a defining moment in history.
  • Unofficially worked at gay bars who otherwise couldn’t afford security.

Bayard Rustin

  • Was a leading strategist of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement between 1955-1968:
    • The formidable behind the scenes figure of the civil rights movement who organized the March on Washington
    • Through his influence, the civil rights leadership adopted a non-violent stance.
    • Is and was often overlooked in African-American history because of the public’s discomfort with his sexual orientation.
  • Supported LGBTQ rights and movements.
  • Was posthumously awarded Rustin the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Miss Major Griffin-Gracy

  • Another leader in the Stonewall Riots.
  • Has been involved in community efforts since 1978. She has worked at local food banks, provide services for trans women suffering from addiction or homelessness. During the AIDS epidemic she also provided healthcare and funeral services.
  • Is currently serving as the Executive Director for the Transgender GenderVariant Intersex Justice Project, working to assist transgender persons who are disproportionately incarcerated under a prison-industrial complex.

Alvin Ailey

  • At the young age of 22, Alvin AIley became Artistic Directer for the Horton Dance Company where he choreographed as well as directed scenes and costume designs.
  • Formed the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre in 1958 but continued to choreograph for other companies.
  • Ailey’s signature works prominently reflects his Black pride.
  • Is credited for popularizing modern dance. 
  • Was also posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Feel free to add anyone I’ve missed!

slate.com
The FBI Faked an Entire Field of Forensic Science
For more stories like this, like Slate on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. The Washington Post published a story so horrifying this weekend that it would

“‘Of 28 examiners with the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit, 26 overstated forensic matches in ways that favored prosecutors in more than 95 percent of the 268 trials reviewed so far.’ The shameful, horrifying errors were uncovered in a massive, three-year review by the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the Innocence Project. Following revelations published in recent years, the two groups are helping the government with the country’s largest ever post-conviction review of questioned forensic evidence.

Chillingly, as the Post continues, ‘the cases include those of 32 defendants sentenced to death.’ Of these defendants, 14 have already been executed or died in prison.”

Let this sink in for a minute.

10

What a complete shit show. It’s like a scene stolen from Get Out.

NOW can we finally drop kick the Clintons, the DLC and neoliberalism out of the Democratic Party? Can we at least stop pretending that they’re progressives, instead of neoliberals with a “benevolent” plantation owner mentality?

If you haven’t already seen it, now is probably a very very good time to watch 13th, a documentary about how prison labor is legalized slavery.

Bill Clinton was bad enough for Black people: Think about all the harmful anti-Black legislation he actively supported, like the Crime Bill of 1994 (mass incarceration), TANF (gutted welfare), how he signed legislation that blocked Pell Grants from going to prisoners seeking education, to how he blocked parents with drug arrest records from receiving food and housing assistance.

And now remember Hillary’s racist super predators speech (who needed to be “brought to heel” like animals), and how it took her 20 years to give a tepid non-apology, and how she literally had to be BEGGED to stop taking money from the private prison industry. The Clintons are foul.

YES, we still need to get rid of Donald Trump. No one is losing sight of that. But we can chew gum and walk at the same time. To beat Trump by wide margins we need actual progressives in 2018 and 2020. Not Third Way “moderates”. Not centrists. We need—we demand—progressives. By now it should be painfully clear that we can do better than Bill or Hillary Clinton. They are a political gift to Republicans and a liability to progressives. Any political influence that the Clintons hold over the Democratic Party needs to be completely rejected and eliminated. And that includes revamping or eliminating the rigged Super Delegate system.

theguardian.com
Chelsea Manning: to those who kept me alive all these years, thank you
When I was afraid, you taught me how to keep going. When I was lost, you showed me the way...
By Chelsea E Manning

sry the prison industry as a whole, even state and federal prisons are just cheap ways to get slave labor, out of people society largely doesn’t give a shit about, and should be abolished. 

They aren’t about reformation, they aren’t about justice, they aren’t even about punishment, they’re about profit.

Today, May 17th, IDAHOT, Chelsea Manning is to be released from prison.

On a personal level I am so so happy for her and I hope she is safe, loved and supported and has a chance to rest, to heal, to overcome. I hope the shit media leave her alone and I hope the first image of her that gets blasted in every newspaper is one that she is happy about.

On a community level, I keep in mind that this is the work of a dedicated group of activists, who kept on pushing, who didn’t give up and didn’t let go, who did the work of pressing for her freedom even after most people had moved on to other things.

And I keep in my heart all the people who didn’t get there, who never got liberty, safety, healing. All whose cases were ‘too complicated’ for most activist groups to stand behind them. All who were left behind because our movements are not consistant and principled enough to leave no one behind and there is a tendency to focus on a few famous cases.

This IDAHOT I think of every prisoner that is not free yet.

A couple weeks ago I got an anoynmous message asking me to explain what “reverse racism” was and why people argue it doesn’t exist.
I was waiting for a good time to respond but I can’t find the message. Last night my roommate said that people can be racist toward white people. So I figured now is a good time.

And while I do know that my feed is completely liberal and full of people that hold a like mind toward mine, so I doubt I might find someone that this may trigger but here is some explanations you may share with someone if you hear them spit the “reverse racism” card.

First, the issues behind reverse racism can be caught with issues of semantics and rhetoric.

When we get into the issues of semantics people look at other pivotal and important aspects of racism such as prejudice and bigotry. And while it is true that people can have a prejudicial view towards white people that perspective is not bound by racism. Because by definition racism is the systematic oppression of people based entirely on race that trickles down and becomes an attitude that people hold toward another. In other words it is institutionalized and also exists among individuals. Since white people hold the highest advantage in society they can’t experience racism. Yes, we white people can experience negative attitude towards being white but that is not racism that is prejudice. And they are NOT the same thing. So, that’s the issue with semantics.

The other issue is with the rhetoric which directly plays off of the issue with semantics. White people play the “reverse racism” card in an attempt to undermine the oppression and suffering of those that experience racism. They do this because they want others to look at them as not holding racism, but that in itself is racism because you completely ignore the issues surrounding being a person of color in America. The whole, “ I don’t see color we all suffer. All lives matter.” It’s a rhetoric they play into in order to dissolve their guilt or blend their racism. So, the rhetoric is a completely inaccurate attempt to push the “reverse racist” card. Because the rhetoric does not even play into what they are actually trying to explain. The argument is completely unbounded. And falls short of meaning.

And the reality of racism is that no white person will ever experience the outcomes of racism to the extent that people of color do, and when they experience things like not getting a job application, being denied housing, being denied a job, police brutality, mass incarceration, unequal sentencing it is NEVER based on being white. While, on a larger scale often these outcomes directly come from being a person of color.

So next time a white person cries that they have experienced racism please tell us to check our white privilege. And furthermore, at any point I encourage a person of color to further elaborate or explain further because this is an issue that I completely feel that a white voice should never shout over those that truly experience the discussion at hand. And lastly, racism is beyond more complex than described as above and it’s important to note that I am entirely speaking of the American social construction of racism that exists here. Because I understand it may entirely operate in different conditions in different cultures and countries.
Civil disobedience is not our problem. Our problem is civil obedience. Our problem is that people all over the world have obeyed the dictates of leaders…and millions have been killed because of this obedience…Our problem is that people are obedient all over the world in the face of poverty and starvation and stupidity, and war, and cruelty. Our problem is that people are obedient while the jails are full of petty thieves… (and) the grand thieves are running the country. That’s our problem.
—  Howard Zinn
The prison … functions ideologically as an abstract site into which undesirables are deposited, relieving us of the responsibility of thinking about the real issues afflicting those communities from which prisoners are drawn in such disproportionate numbers … It relieves us of the responsibility of seriously engaging with the problems of our society, especially those produced by racism and, increasingly, global capitalism.
—  Angela Davis, “Are Prisons Obsolete?”