the poison gas

THE DEVELOPERS OF “BATMAN: ARKHAM ASYLUM” INITIALLY COMBATED GAME PIRATES BY INSERTING CODE INTO THE GAME THAT WOULD PREVENT ANYONE FROM BEING ABLE TO PLAY ON AN UNLICENSED COPY. THIS CODE WOULD DETECT IF THE GAME HAD BEEN PIRATED, AND INSTEAD OF REPORTING THE COPY OR DISABLING THE GAME, IT WOULD MODIFY THE PLAYER CHARACTER.

THE PIRATED VERSION OF THE GAME WOULD FEATURE A BATMAN WITH SIGNIFICANTLY LESS COORDINATION, CAUSING HIM TO BE UNABLE TO USE HIS CAPE TO GLIDE FOR MORE THAN A FEW FEET. 

WHILE THIS WOULD SEEM LIKE A RATHER TRIVIAL CHANGE TO MAKE, ONE OF THE FIRST MISSIONS OF THE GAME REQUIRES THE PLAYER TO GLIDE OVER A PIT OF POISON GAS TO THE NEXT PLATFORM. IF BATMAN FALLS INTO THE GAS, HE DIES, AND IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO GET TO THE NEXT PLATFORM MY JUMPING, CLIMBING, OR GRAPPLING. THE PLAYER WOULD GET THROUGH THE INITIAL LEVELS OF THE GAME, ONLY TO FIND AN IMPASSABLE BOUNDARY. 

IT WAS DESIGNED, HOWEVER, TO SEEM LIKE A GLITCH IN THE DESIGN OF THE GAME, AND MANY PIRATES WOULD POST ABOUT IT ON THE CUSTOMER SUPPORT FORUMS, EXPOSING THEMSELVES AS PIRATES. 

List of crystals and how NOT to charge them

I kinda need to make this list for myself and I thought I would make it here. Just to be as clear as possible, DO NOT, and I mean DO NOT, charge them this way as it will damage your crystal and depending on what kind it is, it can be harmful for you as well. This list will not be alphabetized because I’m a little disorderly (lmao).

Turquoise- Water, Salt, Sunlight
Rose Quartz- Sunlight
Amethyst- Sunlight
Smoky Quartz- Sunlight
Aquamarine- Sunlight
Kunzite- Sunlight, Salt
Fluorite- Sunlight
Hiddenite- Sunlight
Spodumene- Sunlight
Halite- Water
Sulfates (Borates, Calcite, Gypsum)- Water
Lapis Lazuli- Water
Malachite- WATER (toxic), Salt
Ivory- Water
Pyrite- Water, High Humidity
Calcite: Vinegar/acetone, Salt
Gypsum- Vinegar/acetone
Limestone- Vinegar/acetone
Marble- Vinegar/acetone
Amber- Acetone, Salt
Cinnabar- HEAT (poisonous gas)
Realgar- HEAT (poisonous gas)
Stibnite- HEAT (poisonous gas)
Angelite- Salt
Azurite- Salt
Dioptase- Salt
Imperial Topaz- Salt
Fire opal- Salt
Opal- Salt
Kyanite- Salt
Moonstone- Salt
Red coral- Salt
Selenite- Salt, Water
Apatite- Vinegar/acetone, Water

Hope this helps! Feel free to add on

Reminder:

  • Everything is made of chemicals
  • Some of these chemicals have long and complicated names but are perfectly harmless
  • Elements in combination have very different properties to elements on their own (Chlorine is a poisonous gas used in WWI; sodium chloride is table salt. Just because a compound has something toxic e.g. chlorine, mercury, benzene derivatives in its molecular structure doesn’t mean the compound itself is toxic)
  • There is a safe and a toxic dose for everything (there’s a tiny, safe dose of arsenic or plutonium; there’s a toxic dose of water or oxygen)
  • Natural does not mean good (poison ivy, death cap fungi, box jellyfish neurotoxin, arsenic and radioactivity are all natural)
  • Artificial does not mean bad (medicine, increased food yields, transportation, clothes and the Internet are all artificial)
  • Information can be taken out of context and statistics can be used to mislead (Water (dihydrogen monoxide) is the main constituent of acid rain, it dissolves more substances than any other known liquid, it kills if inhaled, causes severe burns and has been found in all cancer tumours)

Remember all of the above next time you see a scare story about “chemicals” in food or water or read about an “all natural” health product or food! (Of course some chemicals can be toxic. The current West Virginia contaminated water tragedy is a good example. But don’t take all your science information from scare stories in the mainstream media! Scientific journals and textbooks are much more reliable.)

4

The Swingin’ Harlem Hellfighters Band,

The Harlem Hellfighters have taken to the spotlight in modern times thanks to the popularity of the video game “Battlefield 1″, where the African American soldiers are featured in the very opening of the game. The US 369th Infantry Regiment was a unit of African American soldiers who served with incredible distinction during World War I. During the war many white American soldiers refused to serve with blacks, and as a result the 369th was assigned to the French Army, the French having little qualms with serving with African Americans, nor did they have a policy of segregation such as the US Army. They were even issued French weapons and wore French helmets while in combat. During their service in World War I the 369th was nicknamed by the French “The Harlem Hellfighters” because of their tenacious fighting spirit.  They never gave ground in combat, not one soldier was ever captured, and they served the longest continuous deployment of any other Allied unit during the war (191 days of continuous combat). Due to their bravery, they were also among the most decorated Allied units, with two Medals of Honor, 171 French Croix de Guerre’s, and numerous Distinguished Service Crosses.

One of the most unique features of the Harlem Hellfighter’s was their band, perhaps the only unit in the entire war to have a ragtime band.  Unlike pretty much all other military bands which played traditional marches and martial music, the Harlem Hellfighter Band played the music they loved and could perform best, mostly American ragtime music and early forms of Jazz.  The Harlem Hellfighter Band was directed by Lt. James Reese Europe, a man who was certainly fit for the job as he was the band leader of the Clef Club Orchestra, a band popular in New York for their ragtime and proto-jazz music.

On April 8th, 1918 French soldiers turned their heads in wonder as The Harlem Hellfighters marched toward the front to the tunes of hot ragtime and Jazz beats. 

No one in Europe had ever heard such music, in fact Jazz was barely even heard in the United States outside of a few communities in New Orleans, Chicago, and New York.  The new music became an instant hit among both French and British soldiers, and before long the Harlem Hellfighters Band was being called to perform for French and British units all along the line, as well as villages they passed through. Soon, the Harlem Hellfighters swinging sound took Western Europe by storm, and the band was even invited to perform in Paris at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées. Among the Hellfighters biggest hits was a ragtime tune called “Memphis Blues”.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJPztEjzf6s

Another popular hit was “On Patrol in No Man’s Land”, written by Lt. James Europe himself while recuperating after being wounded in a poison gas attack while on patrol.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpFCuZ-B4j0

And then of course the biggest crowd pleaser given the location and audience was a jazzed up version of “Le Marseillaise”  

After the war the band would make a grand tour of Europe, then return home and make a grand tour of the United States. Stories of the Harlem Hellfighters unique sound had spread across American and people were demanding more.  During their American tour, the band cut 24 records. Everywhere they went, whether in Europe or the United States, they drew huge cheering crowds, they had become the superstars of their day. 

Unfortunately the story of the Harlem Hellfighters Band did not end well for James Europe. On the night of May 9th, 1919 Europe confronted one of his drummers over poor and unprofessional behavior.  The drummer, known as a hothead among the band members, attacked Europe and stabbed him in the throat with a penknife. Europe bled out and died while in the hospital later that night.

The legacy of the Harlem Hellfighters Band is as grand and all encompassing for music as the Great War itself.  Essentially, the band is credited with spreading the popularity of Jazz throughout Europe and America. Before World War I, Jazz was a niche genre of music, common only among African Americans living in certain areas of New York, New Orleans, and Chicago.  After the exploits of the Harlem Hellfighters Band Jazz would spread across the world, becoming the dominant form of popular music up to the 1950′s and serving as the predecessor to popular music styles today such as rock, hip hop, pop, and soul.

2

“We know each other. She’s a friend from work!” Thor laughed as you walked into the arena.

“Oh no way dude! What are you doing here at the contest of champions?!” You yelled, dropping your weapons and fist bumping him the way you taught him. He chuckles at you as he also drops his own weapon.

“Well you know, my hammer got destroyed and Asgard’s in ruins but that doesn’t matter. How are doing on this fine day?” He asked, chuckling as he gave you a bear hug.

“Uh well, maybe trying to signal aliens on Stark towers roof wasn’t such a bright idea. But these people are so easy to beat like, with my badass powers of toxic gas either they die from suffocation or get poisoned,” You shrugged grinning, before your face fell for a moment in thought, “Although I did have to fight this one guy who was a fish man with a tank around his head, I had to use my fighting skills then!”

“OH FOR ODIN’S SAKE, FIGHT HER YOU IMBICILE,” Loki called down from his VIP seat.

“We are joyous enough to just speak thank you very much,” Thor called back, slapping a hand to your shoulder. You snapped your fingers as an idea came to you.

“Why don’t we do a two on two, we’ll team up and you can send in two of your other champions,” You suggested, Thor just shook his head with a small smile on his face. You just loved fighting too much sometimes.

“Well, that would be more entertaining,” The Collector mumbled as Loki pouted like a child.

“Fine, but send out the best,” Loki complained, getting annoyed that his brother was having such a good day. The doors lifted as the next champions headed out.

“He’s another friend from work!” Thor yelled as the hulk came running out. Your face fell and lost all it’s colour as you gripped your sword tighter.

“Thor I regret my decision, please help me beat him,” You stressed as you saw another competitor walk out. A ringing suddenly went out across the stadium it was-

“JOHN CENA!” The crowd cheered as his theme music came on and you watched as the living legend walked out. Thank god you hadn’t been the only one taken from Earth.

 [Instagram Post]

☆We just saw Wonder Woman in theaters and oml it was good! ! I just had to draw the somewhat-main villain, Dr. Poison☆ Also, first to draw the 2017 movie version? ? Woh! !      

Humans are weird

So I have an addition to Humans are Weird.

So you all know that urge we have when we want to hug the living shit out of adorable creatures? Well, this is actually a real scientific reaction called “cute aggression” (source) and the behaviour springs up even more when we actually can’t touch the cause of Cuteness.

Can you just imagine the aliens’ reactions to the fact that humans are pretty much brain wired to kill things we find cute? And that a lot of them are baby animals that grows up to be vicious creatures that could probably kill us?

Like, the aliens are having a live sending about the most dangerous animals in the known galaxies and they have numerous teams all over the place. They are filming it from afar and have studied them as much as possible and they’re like:

Narrator

This is a Fantolus cub that will grow up to be most deadly predator on the death planet Moss. A fully grown Fantolus spews poisonous gas and can kill you i- what the-?

           Narrator breaks off in confusion.

On screen, tiny figures are approaching the cub. The cub looks harmless and innocent. The alien film crew zooms in. It’s a group of humans. They have sound.

Human with fancy space hat

           Human looks into camera.

Hey, how ya doin’? Look over there, right there. That’s a Fantolus cub. If the mother finds me this close, and I’m gone!

I’m gonna pick it up.

           Human hugs it to death. The other humans sigh enviously.  

048-SMOKROACH [Smoke-Cockroach]
-Bug/Poison
- The Roach pokemon
-Ability: Stench/Filter- Liquid Ooze(HA)
-“This pokemon lives on places filled with garbage and waste, laying very close to the floor. If by accident you step on a hidden SMOKROACH, it will expel a noxious cloud of gas that can knock you out”
-Moveset:
    -Selfdestruct
    -Bug Bite
    -Poison Gas
    -Acid Spray

049-KEMIKROACH [Chemical-Cockroach]
-Bug/Poison
- The Toxic Gas pokemon
-Ability: Stench/Filter- Liquid Ooze(HA)
-“This mysterious pokemon live in places too toxic for humans to enter without proper protection, among the waste. In its back it has developed a tank-like bladder where it creates toxic gases and liquids that can be expelled at will”
-Moveset:
    -Sludge Bomb
    -Flamethrower
    -Clear Smog
    -Explosion

yahoo.com
Idaho boy injured, family dog killed by government 'cyanide bomb'
A "cyanide bomb" planted by U.S. predator-control agents targeting coyotes near homes and hiking trails on BLM land in Idaho exploded when a boy handled the device, injuring him and killing his dog, authorities and relatives said on Friday.

SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) - A “cyanide bomb” planted by U.S. predator-control agents targeting coyotes near homes and hiking trails in Idaho exploded when a boy handled the device, injuring him and killing his dog, authorities and relatives said on Friday.

Canyon Mansfield, 14, was playing with his yellow Labrador retriever, Casey, on Thursday afternoon near his home east of Pocatello when he saw what he thought was a sprinkler head on the ground and touched the device, causing it to detonate.

The explosion sprayed the boy and his 3-year-old, 90-pound (40 kg) pet with toxic cyanide gas, according to the boy’s mother, Theresa Mansfield.

“Canyon said there was a bang like a bomb, then an explosion of an orange substance that covered him and Casey, who was writhing in pain on the ground before he died right in front of Canyon,” she said.

Her husband, Pocatello physician Mark Mansfield, rushed to the scene and pounded on the dog’s chest in a futile effort to revive the animal.

The family and first-responders underwent decontamination procedures and the boy, who was sprayed in the face, was tested for cyanide poisoning at a hospital for the second time Friday, officials and family members said.

The device, called an M-44, was among several placed in the area by Wildlife Services, an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that targets coyotes, wolves, cougars, foxes and other animals considered nuisances to farms and ranches.

The agency has been sued by conservation groups claiming that its programs to poison, trap and shoot various predator species violate federal environmental and wildlife protection laws.

Keep reading

First Use of Mustard Gas

July 12 1917, Ypres–The Germans had been using gas warfare since early 1915, with its western debut at Ypres to great effect that April.  Effective countermeasures, largely in the form of gas masks, prevented future breakthroughs solely due to the use of poison gas, though it remained a deadly nuisance for both sides.  Embracing this aspect, the Germans developed and deployed a new weapon whose main purpose was to cause pain to and incapacitate enemy soldiers.

Mustard gas is a blistering agent that would cause few immediate symptoms, but several hours later would result in painful chemical blisters and burns all over the body, eye damage, and lung damage if inhaled.  Gas masks, if worn, would only prevent the latter two effects.  Technically a fine aerosol rather than a gas, it would also eventually fall to the ground and cover surfaces, potentially causing future exposure.  While this made it more difficult to attack areas exposed to mustard gas, this was little problem for a defending army.

On July 12, the Germans used mustard gas for the first time, firing 50,000 rounds of gas shells at the British lines near Ypres, where the Germans had observed a British buildup in progress.  Nearly 2500 British soldiers were gassed; of these, only 87 died, though many others suffered debilitating chemical burns.  The British first called this new weapon “Yellow Cross;” the French, “Yperite.”

Today in 1916: German Merchant Submarine Offloads Cargo in Baltimore
Today in 1915: British Celebrate Destruction of SMS Königsberg
Today in 1914: Final Assassin Apprehended in Montenegro

The Things We Fear

This was a lot gayer than I thought it would be. I owe the outline of the first part to @thesickficsideblog, but I kinda ran away with it at the end. I swear, it wasn’t supposed to be Klance, but my hand slipped. I’ll put it on ao3 later.

Summar: Lance gets trapped in a room full of fear gas, and the team can’t do anything but watch.

Implied/referenced torture

Keep reading

Tunnel Warfare 

Under enemy lines.

Since ancient times, armies have used mining and tunneling as a way of besieging their enemies. In classical antiquity, armies dug tunnels under enemy walls, and then set fire to timber in the tunnel, causing the shaft to collapse and with it enemy wall. Armies came up with increasingly ingenious ways to use tunnels, or to fight back against them. In 285, Sassanid Persians used poison gas to kill Roman engineers tunneling under their walls. In medieval times, gunpowder became the weapon of choice to place under enemy lines, blowing them sky-high.

The Western Front of World War I was essentially a medieval siege battle on a massive scale, and thus tunnel warfare surfaced again in history. Digging was a way of getting around the strategic impasse of trench-fighting. From the very beginning, the armies employed former miners in crude operations, digging under enemy lines, placing TNT in the mine-shafts, and then blowing up enemy trenches from below. Or tunnels could dig secret entrances into No-Man’s Land or enemy trenches, allowing soldiers to cross into enemy territory safely.

How it worked.

By 1917 tunnel warfare had become a complex and sophisticated operation. Britain recruited professional coal miners from Wales and Australia, as well as the “clay kickers” who had designed the London underground. Germany and France employed miners of their own, each side mining under enemy lines, or searching and destroying the underground tunnels of their enemies.

French sappers listen for vibrations that would detect enemy German diggers.

The most effective case ever was on June 7, 1917, when the British began the Battle of Messines by detonating 19 mines, with over 1 million tons of explosives, under German lines. The noise could be heard in London, 140 miles away. It was the loudest noise produced by humans in history up to that point, and the deadliest non-nuclear explosion of all time.

One of 19 mines goes up at Messines, June 7 1917.

Tunnel warfare was a deadly business. It came, first of all, with all the natural risks of mining. Shafts could collapse suddenly, burying sappers alive. In the clay soil of Belgium, where the water table was very high, mines flooded almost instantly, and soldiers spent laborious hours pumping out water. Complicated breathing apparatuses might be necessary for when oxygen ran out. Furthermore, sappers worked underground with massive quantities of dynamite. An accidental spark here or there and thousands of tons of TNT could blow up.

A sawn-off Lee Enfield rifle for underground fighting.

Even more risks came from the enemy. When one side mined, the other side dug counter-mines. Sappers listened for vibrations from underground, and if they heard the enemy digging, they could rig another tunnel to blow in the enemy excavation. Or, like the ancient Persians, they could find the enemy sap and siphon in gas. And sometimes the methods of war underground were truly medieval. Sometimes enemy sappers ran into each other underground, suddenly bursting through an underground wall. In these cases, nightmarish subterranean conflicts took place in the pitch dark, as man killed each other with knuckle-dusters, knives, and sawn-off bolt-action rifles.

A crater formed by one mine at Messines Ridge.