the people are mostly good times

The pre-Thanksgiving rush of college, where anything and everything is due, is obviously over. Phew. I don’t have much of anything I need to do over this break. Besides a bit of capstone. But I spent the last couple days at home, doing pretty much nothing. Chillin with my dad. I didn’t even go on my laptop. It was a nice break.

Trying to avoid social media even more now has been good. Sometimes I still find myself picking up my phone, swiping across my app screens, for no apparent reason other than to fill time with it. To hope there’s something to check. But going through that little ritual in 20 seconds is better than wasting 2 hours, and too much focus, to Social Media™.

Because let’s be real; social media is mostly a waste of time. It can be entertaining. You can talk to people you care about (or fight internet trolls, your choice). Sometimes you genuinely want to spend time there rather than using it as a distraction. A break, not an addiction. But I think most of us can agree that a lot of social media time is wasted time.

More information, more exposure, more stimuli… More is not always better.

Keep reading

Extroverted and introverted versions of the signs
  • EXTROVERTED ARIES: Talks to everybody, even the people that they don't like. Smiles a lot, loves shopping and travelling, loves partying, can't keep them at one place when they're out at night. They have to visit all the nightclubs and bars. Loves shopping and dresses colourfully most of the time, but can be really competitive at times which makes them even mean. A big foodie and can't get enough of anything they do
  • INTROVERTED ARIES: Speaks only to their mom, wishes everyone else could just die because they hate everybody, but is actually very VERY nice to people. Loves cats and inspiring quotes but can be a real backstabbing bitch. Even though they're introverted, they still love being the most popular one
  • EXTROVERTED TAURUS: Talks to everyone about everything, can sit with a serial killer and have a normal conversation. Spends millions of dollars on food and coffee, hugs every animal they see on the street, has LOTS of friends, but tends to forget some of their friends because they constantly make new friends and don't have the ability to keep control over the communication with all of their friends
  • INTROVERTED TAURUS: Very passive, VERY LAZY, doesn't want to get out of bed, loves watching films and TV series, loves listening to music alone or with their partner, very caring and kind, loves animals and they think that they have the hidden magical ability to communicate with animals while it seems like they're just being foolish talking to every pet of their friends
  • EXTROVERTED GEMINI: Very communicative, a literal drama queen, has tons of acquaintances but hates almost everybody and almost everybody hates them. Has like only 3 real friends who do not use the Gemini because this Gemini simply doesn't know when to shut up. Talks to everyone and can be really bitchy at times. Doesn't know how to keep secrets and spreads gossip and rumors like 104% of the time. Loves shopping and art, but also loves hoeing around to death. Also, loves champagne - be it cheap or expensive, it just needs to be champagne (preferably pink).
  • INTROVERTED GEMINI: Loves staying in bed all day, twittering, sitting on tumblr and instagram and basically every single social media. Really talented but for like very strange things. Doesn't like eggs. Gets bored of people very often and can't stand staying with another person in the same room for more than 20 minutes. Constantly wants to go home but when they go home they don't know why the hell they went home - they realized that they liked staying outside better. Has a very interesting blog, tries to stay healthy and always tries to start their life anew, but they just can't give up on their vices, especially smoking. Loves comfort and velvet clothing. Likes reading magazines and loves the fashion world but they have no clue how to dress because they're too anxious about their choices. Their mind is so fast and they learn quickly
  • EXTROVERTED CANCER: Literally a SPAMMER. Spams everybody in real life too, not only on social media. Obsessed with anime and japanese things. Likes k-pop. Thinks they're the master but can be really boring sometimes because they just can't stop talking about topics that nobody is interested in. But very pure and good. Gets kinda hellish when they're angry, they can't control their temper even 1%. Really strong physically and doesn't get sick very often. Loves their friends and their family and always gives GREAT advice. Obsessed with cats and dogs and animals in global
  • INTROVERTED CANCER: Always draws some cute anime things on their notebooks, really intelligent but just can't study because they can't stay focused because they overthink everything. Really intense emotions but seems unemotional because they don't even show 20% of their emotions. Has like only 1 or 2 friends, 3 tops. Loves their mom and is really connected with her. Has some hidden talents that nobody knows about, like, making pancakes or some weird shit that you could have never thought of. A really good cook
  • EXTROVERTED LEO: Gets on the verge of a nervous breakdown if they're not the center of attention. REALLY intelligent and learns really fast but there are things that they just can't learn, like, maths or some specific subject that makes them seem stupid. But they're not stupid, they're just over-enthusiastic about everything. Rolls their eyes very often and acts really bossy all the time. Loves people and loves visiting their friends and relatives. Doesn't like to get abused and manipulated while they use and manipulate people on a daily basis, just for fun. But can be easily manipulated into something, even if they're aware of that, because their pride doesn't let them "lose". Likes reading books and doesn't understand paintings. Thinks they're a good leader while they might lead people to hell .... just for fun.
  • INTROVERTED LEO: A cinnamon roll too pure for this world, learns things really quickly and loves helping people. They're a really good supporter. Totally connected to their cat and thinks their cat is secretly a human being or a miracle. Idolizes things and people. Quite afraid of things most of the time and really, really socially anxious but doesn't show it because their pride doesn't let them. But it can be obvious sometimes, believe me. Likes having long conversations with their friends, but has only one or two friends so they literally can't stop talking or typing when they're alone with their friend. Doesn't let their parents find out anything about themselves and makes everybody watch their favourite tv show
  • EXTROVERTED VIRGO: Really communicative and organized, a great leader, full of knowledge, doesn't really show their emotions by keeping a poker face most of the time. A really good supporter and knows how to lead people on the right way. A very good teacher in life. You can learn a lot from them. Their capabilities know no boundaries. Very, very intelligent and ambitious but not power-hungry... well, ok, sometimes. Really enthusiastic about the topic they're talking about but doesn't want anyone to find out that they're obsessed with that particular thing. Loves coffee and loves food. Always achieves their goals and it's mostly done the hard way
  • INTROVERTED VIRGO: Their mind is chaos, just unbearable. Certainly NOT organized, doesn't even know where they're going when they get out of their house. Hates most people and thinks that most people hate them, but really chill when they're outside with their friends. Just doesn't know how to communicate with people properly and they're really, really obsessed with themselves. They have a higher opinion on themselves (read egotistic). Intelligent but doesn't know how to use their intelligence and they always refuse advice
  • EXTROVERTED LIBRA: Communicative af, even when they don't know what they're talking about. Has knowledge in all spheres of life and is a really sweet cinnamon roll too pure for this world. Tons of emotions and needs constant reminders to stay organized like sticky notes and stuff. Has interesting style and has the best eyebrows. Really appealing and beautiful, both physically and mentally. Likes seeming normal just because they're keeping their kinky self for their partner. Really good in bed and really intelligent. Very, VERY committed once they find the true love of their life but can be a fuckboy/fuckgirl when they haven't found their true love because they love experimenting with people and is aware that they can get the most beautiful boyfriends and girlfriends
  • INTROVERTED LIBRA: Loves books and shopping and is really organized. Likes pastel colours and loves cats. Behaves like royalty and wants to be admired. REally feminine. A dreamy girl/boy who wants to find their soulmate. Enjoys coffee, tea, long walks and deep conversations. Likes staring through their window and is often absent-minded, daydreams a lot. Really good, genuine and kind. Cries after somebody hurts them but always forgives people and is really not combative. Likes poetry and loves speaking in public, although they're an introvert
  • EXTROVERTED SCORPIO: Loves meeting new people and can really be successful but often wastes that potential on getting drunk, partying, love and sex. But still, dazzles with their appearance and is really hot. Hides their low self-confidence by manipulating people and hurting others just to feel good and in control. Really loyal to the people who are their TRUE friends but often tends to skip going out with their friends because there's some diCc/puSsi on the plate. But still, loyal to death and never hesitates to reach their hand and help a friend in need of help. Can be really problematic and chaotic because they're unorganized but they live in their own world and know that everything is going to be okay
  • INTROVERTED SCORPIO: Way too socially anxious and doesn't care about anyone hurting their emotions. Really depressed most of the time but forgets about their depression when they're with their friends. They don't have too many friends because they're introverted af and they don't know how to communicate with people in public. Can be quite inappropriate but always knows how to make others laugh. Will act as a clown if it helps a friend to stop being sad. Really intelligent and rarely uses their intelligence and potential because they're busy eating tasty food while playing video games or watching movies. They're even socially awkward with animals - that's how far it goes with introverted people with this sign. But not to be mistaken, they're really good and emotional but they don't like showing their emotions in front of people, they think it makes them weak SADasd
  • EXTROVERTED SAGITTARIUS: Emotional as fuck. They're emotions are chaos and they're so fucking introverted that everybody can see what's going on in their life. In fact, they LOVE exposing themselves. Really physically beautiful, popular and active on social media. Has great aesthetics and is obsessed with shopping. Acts like royalty and loves commanding people. A little bit self-centered and egotistic and think that they're always right, so when somebody doesn't accept their opinion they instantly start raging about it
  • INTROVERTED SAGITTARIUS: Loves bossing people around, even though they're an introvert. Hates showing their emotions and can be a really big manipulator at times. However, very emotional and one of the biggest fighters there are. Really, REALLY intense. You don't want to see them getting mad. They can easily hurt you but you can easily hurt them too because they're fragile as fuck on the inside, but they will never admit that you've hurt them in any way because they're proud as fuck so nobody is messing with the queen
  • EXTROVERTED CAPRICORN: Really funny and interesting, talks to everybody about everything. Always says what's on their mind and loves buying unique things. Doesn't have good grades but that doesn't mean that they're unintelligent or stupid. On the contrary. Very intelligent and daydreams a lot, loves telling jokes and has a fucked up sense of humor. So unique. Loves money but doesn't like to admit it lmao. Very artistic and loves philosophy, animals, nature, music and languages. A fair player most of the time and knows how to support their friends. Selfless on the outside, selfish on the inside. Also, loves cooking some strange things which usually taste very weird but in a good way
  • INTROVERTED CAPRICORN: Doesn't speak at all and just sits there waiting for the world to end. You really just can't make them say a word because they're a little bit self-centered and they think that they don't have to waste their time talking to unimportant people about unimportant things. However, they can get really silly sometimes and burst off, even though they're an introvert. Can't stop talking about things they love, it's really strange how such a person who doesn't talk at all - turns into a youtuber the moment they find out that somebody likes the same things that they do. Money kinda rule their world and they really want to earn money with everything they do, but having no money doesn't stop them from achieving the things they want in life
  • EXTROVERTED AQUARIUS: You just can't see them sober. Parties, drugs, journeys, walks in nature and such things move their world. Just can't stop partying all the time. Has lots of friends and is really popular, probably is a DJ or a famous singer. Really seductive and beautiful physically. Simply everybody is their friend (except for the people they hate lmao) and they can always find someone to hang out with, because everybody wants to hang out with them. Really intense and quite bitchy most of the time, which makes them seem really arrogant but that's just how it is and they are fully aware of this
  • INTROVERTED AQUARIUS: You can't see emotions on their face. It's impossible. They might even question themselves if they're human beings because they aren't really aware of their emotions most of the time. Loves plants and things like aliens, unicorns, etc. Lives in a fantasy world and hates the real world. So impatient about everything and has nervous breakdowns when somebody complains about something they do. Really nice to people, even though they hate like 99% of them. Has probably a tumblr blog and rages on it about everything. Roasts famous people on twitter and doesn't even care about it
  • EXTROVERTED PISCES: Goal-oriented as fuck. Doesn't stop until they get what they want. REALLY emotional, maybe the sign with the most intense emotions out there. Is a really good friend with everybody but can be a little bit bitchy and arrogant at times, especially when things are not going their way. Actually, when it's hard for them to get or achieve something, they use manipulation to get what they want. As I said, their emotions are very intense so literally everything hurts them because they're sensitive as fuck. Eccentric af. When somebody hurts them in any way, they always find a way to hurt that person's back and nobody can even see that they're behind everything that's happening to that person. Sly. But very loyal to their real friends and will never let them down. When they love - they love with every piece of their soul and would put their heart into a person they love's hands, if it needs be. Because of their intense temper, sometimes they might seem like a fiery sign because they explode and hurt people really quickly
  • INTROVERTED PISCES: So fucking sensitive and their mind is chaos. Doesn't know what they're doing most of the time but in the end they always succeed in everything they do. People see them as fragile but that's just how they seem. They are actually really strong because they've been through a lot. Born with tremendous artistic tendencies and art is literally their life. They are very talented. Loves animals, shopping, nature, taking long walks, deep conversations and stargazing. Loves books and learning new weird languages and has tons of inside jokes with their 2 friends. They open up really hardly and they just don't let everybody in their life - they are really picky when it comes to people that they let in their life. Socially anxious as fuck and will look like a fool if they try to talk in public, so they avoid such situations
musicals as kids you knew in high school

Les Mis: dramatic foreign exchange kid who plays up their own country’s stereotypes to mess with the other students. Huge heart; cries at the end of literally every movie. In with the popular kids.

The Book of Mormon: the most politically incorrect kid you’ve ever met. Whenever they say anything, you wait a few moments and look around at the other students to make sure it’s okay to laugh. You sometimes lay awake thinking about things they’ve said because they’re right.

Newsies: that poor freshman who still hasn’t hit puberty yet. Has a friend group of other woefully prepubescent boys. Think Sam and Company in Freaks and Geeks. They sit in a corner of the lunchroom and hope the athletes won’t find them. Is very vocal about how much they hate the school and won’t shut up about transferring to some school in New Mexico. Ran for student government as a freshman and won, shocking everyone.

Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812: Transferred to your high school for only a year, but no one will ever forget them. Was responsible for planning the legendary senior prank that resulted in the principal running from the school screaming. Eventually got expelled. Some students blame it on racism drama that 1812 themselves actually had nothing to do with; most people understand that this rumor is false.

Waitress: the kid who decorates their binder covers with glittery letters and hums while they organize their locker. Spends free time volunteering: not for their resume, but out of the goodness of their heart. Punched the school bully once and nearly went viral. Is actually reasonably popular–partially because they’re friends with popular junior Sara B., but mostly because they’re such a great person.

Hamilton: the freshman kid who somehow manages honor roll academics, five extracurriculars, a part-time job, a small nonprofit, a mental illness, and a dog. Is legendary for sassy one-liners. Carries speakers everywhere and dances on tables in the cafeteria, getting everyone to sing along. Is somehow really, really popular; some of the other kids are salty.

Rent: the artistic/political kid. Senior who the other kids look up to. Openly responsible for the controversial political graffiti in the bathroom. Got suspended once for protesting the student dress code: the only thing the handbook actually says is that you must wear shoes at all times, so they just showed up to school naked. Is low-key Hamilton’s idol. Like Newsies, also won’t shut up about transferring to some school in New Mexico.

Wicked: the other artistic/political kid, though slightly more on the political side. The kid with all the pins on their messenger bag. Their Facebook is full of social justice rants and emotional videos shared from liberal media pages. Is probably going to become president.

Dear Evan Hansen: the kid who’s really quiet irl, but has ten thousand followers on Tumblr and is a minor online celebrity. On Facebook, posts inspirational quotes in pretty fonts with nature backgrounds and gets maybe two or three likes. Draws on arms with Sharpie during class. Is also somehow in with the popular kids, but chooses not to hang out with them. 

Little Shop of Horrors: the kid who is really sweet but whom you suspect is kinda internally unbalanced. Has a dark sense of humor; makes quiet jokes sometimes that no one else hears, but you do, and you’re terrified. Bonds with Dear Evan Hansen over plant obsession.

Heathers: other slightly unbalanced kid, though they’re more obvious about it. Is basically Ally Sheedy in The Breakfast Club. Sometimes wears rollerskates to school; listens to podcasts and wears headphones everywhere and only takes them off to fight bullies. Actually still uses an iPod. Not really in with the popular kids, but does have a gaggle of admirers among the younger students.

Be More Chill: the kid who works in the computer cluster. Is quite a jokester in general, so people don’t know whether or not to be worried by their self-deprecating jokes. Is in Yearbook and swaps out the class portraits of people they don’t like with the most unflattering pictures in the world. Almost sent that version to print once and had a panic attack in the bathroom. Is actually rather famous for said panic attack in the bathroom. Has an unexpected friendship with Heathers

Falsettos: the senior kid always making snarky but surprisingly philosophical comments at the back of the class. Insists that all everyday objects are metaphors. Always looks to be on the verge of a nervous breakdown. No one understands how everyone in their friend group knows each other. Tried to run for student government, but tragically lost to popular homecoming queen Dolly Midler.

steve did not appreciate my custom made st paddys shirt and he went and got a custom one of his own when he couldnt convince me to change mine.

you should be more proud of your heritage steve. like me. i come from a long proud line of jerks. 

The signs in class

*check Sun, but Moon can also be used here

Aries: Casually chatting with someone, they get bored easily and often don’t pay attention

Taurus: Tries to pay attention and sometimes actually does, but they often get lost in and their thoughts and daydream a lot

Gemini: Random comments to make other people laugh, somehow stays organized even though they look like they’re not paying attention

Cancer: Usually talks to somebody, either the teacher or other people in class, but stays organized.

Leo: One of the people who enjoy debating with the teacher, doesn’t really keep notes but remembers a lot of stuff.

Virgo: Pays attention and makes notes, sometimes they talk to the teacher, but they’re usually not interested in the subject that much.

Libra: Checking out other people, pays attention only when they’re really interested in the subject

Scorpio: Doing everything but paying attention, usually. They’re good at memorizing but they’re mostly interested in something completely different than what they’re talking about in the class

Sagittarius: Only pays attention if they’re interested in the subject, when they are, they usually talk to their teacher and debate 

Capricorn: Most of the time pays attention and makes notes, but if they don’t like the teacher or the subject, they just doodle or something

Aquarius: Sometimes gets super into the subject and then they can go on about it for the rest of the day, but there are days when they just doodle and don’t really pay attention.

Pisces: Snacks, kinda paying attention but mostly daydreaming. Simiraly to Gemini, sometimes they talk to other people and make them laugh

Astrology & Dicks

After a two year long intensive research, I was able to collect information about dick sizes and shapes and how the astrological signs influence them. For this particular scientific investigation in this unexplored realm, I concluded that more accurate results could be collected through the use of several methods. The methods were primarily pretested to validate the use of those particular approaches. The used methods of research concluded surveys (through Snapchat, Skype Calls and Twitter DM’s), observations (on various cam boy sites) and even personal, intimate Interviews (through the help of apps, such as Grindr). 

With the astrological foreknowledge on sexual intercourse, lust and the body, the consensus was to focus on the following areas: 

  • Sun Sign
  • Mars Sign
  • 8th house 

The results (*Disclaimer: Genetics exist*): 

Aries: 

  • Size and girth: They’ll usually either have very short and less girthy dicks, or very big, juicy ones. It’s hard to find an Aries dominant (Sun, Mars 8th) who’s in between. You either don’t feel it or you start walking side to side. 
  • Shape: Not the most pleasing to look at for many people. They’re not clean cut dicks, but rather the kind of dick, where you can count the veins. They also often have a foreskin, that they can not fully pull back. Very distinctive is the fact, that their dicks are almost always shaped in some weird way/angle. 
  • Recap: They are rough and wild as fuck. Even if you don’t like the D at first, they’ll make you love it. 

Taurus: 

  • Size and girth: It’s hard to find a Taurus that’s below average, but it is also almost as hard to find one that is highly above average. If you are not a total size queen, they have the perfect size for you. Almost all of them are girthy, definitely above average. (though proportion-wise, so do not expect a small guy to have a dick as girthy as a red bull can) 
  • Shape: Very clean-cut & straight. Very pleasing to look at, very good to suck on. Not really about shape, but they usually trim their bushes, but the trimmed hair make the dick even more appealing. 
  • Recap: They won’t ever disappoint you. Very sensual and attractive.

Gemini: 

  • Size and girth: Congrats Gemini Sun/Mars/8th house people! You guys are definitely above average (most of the time). Sadly, most of you guys also have pencil dicks. 
  • Shape: Mostly straight or banana-shaped. Not the best dicks in the zodiac, but DEFINITELY not the worst. Clean - looking. 
  • Recap: They know how to please you. Sneaky, charming, sexy. 

Cancer: 

  • Size and girth: Usually really juicy, which makes everything better automatically. They’ll either have a slightly above average dick or a reaally small one. I’m sorry cancers. Your girth is alright though. But who cares anyways, they’re all bottoms. 
  • Shape: Nice to look at. As I said, very juicy. Either straight or banana-shaped. 
  • Recap: Great dicks to suck. There’s something special about their dicks. Cancers can be really kinky sometimes, so fun is guaranteed. 

Leo: 

  • Size and girth: You’d think all of them have huge dicks, but that is suprisingly not the case at all. A lot of them have really small ones. Maybe that’s why they have so many self esteem issues. The ones that don’t have small ones, are definitely above average. (7+ inches)
  • Shape: Nothing too wild, nothing too weird. Dicks are usually straight, could be curved downwards. 

  • Recap: They know (!!!) how to seduce you, they’re literally one of the, if not the best at making the experience one you’ll never forget. They know what to say and they know what to do. You won’t give a damn about the dicks shape or size. 

Virgos: 

  • Size and girth: Usually, petite, not the biggest dicks in the zodiac. Girth is proportion-wise alright.
  • Shape: They have nice looking dicks. Probably the sign with the least deformed looking ones. Their dicks can look like Taurean dicks, which is supposed to be a compliment. 
  • Recap: Well, I guess they’ll try their best to please you. Many would describe them as boring, though that is not their dicks fault. 

Libra: 

  • Size and girth: There’s nothing to discuss here. Big long, girthy perfect dicks. 
  • Shape: Usually straight, some of them are curved left or right. The longer and cleaner looking versions of Taurean dicks. 
  • Recap: Not the most passionate lovers on earth, however they are charming, still really good at sex and usually have nice looking dicks too. 

Scorpio: 

  • Size and girth: The best dicks in the zodiac, don’t even try to argue with me. Big, long, girthy like the Libra dicks, however, Scorpio dicks look a bit rougher and realer, which is what you want in a perfect dick!!! 
  • Shape: PERFECT LOOKING. Girthy as fuck, really long, beautifully shaped (mostly straight or upwards curved). 
  • Recap: You wanna suck on that dick, till you make it cum. Besides Aries’, the most passionate lovers! Not as rough and wild as an Aries, but more emotinally intense sex, that will make you crave their dick at any time!

Sagittarius:

  • Size and girth: Their dicks are really similar to Gemini dicks, their opposite sign. Really long dicks (longer than Geminis), not that girthy though.
  • Shape: Juicy and clean looking. They usually have a long flaccid dick too. 
  • Recap: If you’re looking for size and quality sex, hunt a Sag dick. Though, do not get emotionally involved. 

Capricorn: 

  • Size and girth: As their fellow earth sign, Virgo, petite in size, but an average girth. Strong Saturn influence will not give one a huge dick (except genes say yes).
  • Shape: Nice to look at. Not rough looking like an Aries or Aquarius dick for example. Either fully shaved or a full bush. 
  • Recap: If they care about you, they’ll try their best. Like Sagittarians, not emotionally involed in the act. 

Aquarius: 

  • Size and girth: They’ll usually have long dicks and good girth too. (But just like their opposite sign, Leo, cases of small dicks are not rare.) 
  • Shape: A bit rough looking, they may have the same foreskin problem as Aries’. Though, rough looking is always a compliment. 
  • Recap: Freaks in bed, definitely not boring. They can be real wild and hardcore. 

Pisces: 

  • Size and girth: Often said to have the largest dicks in the zodiac. I don’t want to go that far, but they’re definitely (!) one of the bigger signs. Very girthy too!!
  • Shape: Usually, curved upwards or simply straight. It’s somewhere inbetween rough and clean looking. Nevertheless, very good looking dicks.
  • Recap: Not boring either, they can be real freaky. However, most of the time, it is more emotionally intense than physically. 
[Revised 2/17] Books for Witches, Diviners and Spellcasters

Hi, everyone. A while back (a long time ago, actually), I started an annotated bibliography on books about witchcraft and magick, and I’ve updated it once (last November). 

Since then, I’d been keeping a list of things I need to add to it, but didn’t get around to actually reworking and updating the list a second time until today. Largely because I can’t really go outside much today because of the smog. But anyways, here it is. I’ve also included divination-related books in this version, whereas previously they were separate.

I hope you find something on here that suits your fancy! Happy reading! Also, yes, I do want to do more book reviews on this blog, so if you’d like a longer review of one of the books listed below, let me know and I can write one.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after reading Energy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Riding and Hedge Witchcraft, by Harmonia Saille. I only mention these two in order to say that they’re best avoided. Saille tries to give a comprehensive look at the phenomenon, but it’s poorly-written and overly New Age. The negative reviews of them on Amazon really cover the problems with these book in more detail than I ever could.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Tarot

The Book of Thoth, by Aleister Crowley. Make sure you actually own (or have access to pictures of) the Thoth deck before you dive into this. By far one of the best books on Tarot ever published. The prose is often dense and purple, but in this one book, Crowley teaches so much about Tarot and it’s connection to the Western Mystery Tradition. I can’t really say much more - it must be experienced.

The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, by Arthur Edward Waite. I recommend this book because it is a classic and was introductory for many older readers. It will teach you to read and gives insight into the methodology behind the Waite-Smith deck specifically, particularly his use of what are essentially parables and why he does this. Do not expect too much esoteric information, but read it anyways.

Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom, by Rachel Pollack. This is the epitome of a good modern Tarot book and is really one of the first ones I’d recommend for someone looking for an accessible book on Tarot in a modern context. Very dense in information and history, yet altogether worth it. You’ll want highlighters nearby for this one!

Tarot for a New Generation, by Janina Renée. This is essentially a book for children and teenagers, but I do recommend it for them, specifically, because it is well-written, easy to understand, and helpful to absolute beginners.

Secrets of the Waite-Smith Tarot, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This book focuses just on the history, symbolism, and creative process of the Waite-Smith deck. It gives you an inside line on just what Pixie Smith was thinking when painting specific scenes, and is a great look at her life’s work, as well.

The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination, by Robert M. Place. This book will not teach you to read Tarot, but does give an actual, accurate portrait of the history of the phenomena, which is incredibly important and useful. Know your history.

Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thoth Tarot, by Lon Milo DuQuette. I hesitate to recommend DuQuette due to issues I have with his approach to Qabalah, but many people ask me for a beginner book for the Thoth Tarot specifically, and this is the closest I’ve come to finding one. I recommend reading this alongside, and not instead of, Crowley’s Book of Thoth.

The Back in Time Tarot, by Janet Boyer. This is more for the intermediate reader, and the entire book details a single, extremely useful technique for familiarizing yourself with the cards, namely by framing past events in terms of how they might appear in a spread.

Lenormand

The Essential Lenormand, by Rana George. This was not the first Lenormand book I picked up, but it was the most influential and intense. Ms. George writes in a personable, touching fashion and brings the concepts of the system home by relating them to life experiences in a way rarely seen. She is one of those authors I literally go all “fangirl” over.

Learning Lenormand, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This is one of the better beginner books on Lenormand. I’m not going to lie - it isn’t as good as Rana George’s, but it definitely is worth reading if you’re completely new to the system. It’s very accessible, where some of the books I’ll be listing later in this can seem intimidating, or so I’ve been told.

Lenormand: Thirty-Six Cards, by Andy Boroveshengra. This book is intense, but in a different way than Ms. George’s. Expect to be inundated with information and techniques. Another one of those where you really need to take notes or highlight while reading, and read it multiple times.

Secrets of the Lenormand Oracle, by Sylvie Steinbach. This book is organized in a novel and useful fashion by topic, and gives specific techniques for readings on love, money, spirituality, and other topics. Highly recommended, and I tend to use it as a reference book nowadays, looking things up as needed.

The Complete Lenormand Oracle Handbook, by Caitlyn Matthews. Not for the beginner, nor the faint at heart, this one details a lot of what, to me, seem to be more advanced approaches and techniques. I use this book a lot, and I think anyone else will enjoy it, too. Good information on the connection between Lenormand and traditional playing cards, too.

Cartomancy with Lenormand and the Tarot, by Patrick Dunn. This is more of a special topic book, and best read after you’ve got some familiarity with both Tarot and Lenormand. It’s all about using them in tandem and the synergy between them.

Astrology

The Luminaries, by Liz Greene. I could really recommend anything by this author, but she’s written so much, and this book is a particularly important one. It focuses entirely on the Sun and Moon in astrology, and gives a good look at why the luminaries need to have a special place in your understanding.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Practical Astrology, by Priscilla Costello. This is focused, as you might expect, on actual interpretation of charts and less on theory, but it gives a good background on that, too. Was quite helpful in my attempts to interpret @xepsurah‘s unusual natal chart.

The Complete Book of Astrology, by Kris Brandt Riske. Very beginner, and very light on intellect, heavy on intuition. A great introduction, but I would not suggest it as the only book you read if you’re really interested in the subject.

Tasseography

Tea Leaf Reading for Beginners, by Caroline Dow. There are only a few books within Llewellyn’s immensely popular “For Beginners” series that I would recommend, and this is one of them. The symbol glossary (which makes up the bulk of the book) is the most useful part.

Tea Cup Reading, by Sasha Fenton. This book goes into some detail (quite a bit, actually) about the history of tea and coffee, and, better yet, how to prepare them in the traditional fashion! A lot of traditional lore is described, as well.

Scrying, etc.

Scrying for Beginners, by Donald Tyson. This is really a surprise find, as I don’t usually expect much from this series, by Tyson knows his history and goes far beyond simple exercises for scrying. He is a bit biased towards mirror and crystal-gazing techniques, but does discuss other methods.

Psychic Development for Beginners, by William Hewitt. Readable, and offers some very practical developmental exercises for those wishing to hone extrasensory abilities. Be prepared to sort through a lot of woo, though.

BNHA Headcanons

Just some head canons I have

Midoriya

- Don’t challenge him to any video game. He will. Destroy. You. Does not matter if you’re his best friend. You’re going down, and he’ll smile the entire time.

- Animals?? Love him?? Koda low-key gets excited.

- Pretty good artist. He doesn’t do it a lot, but it’s one thing him and Bakouga have in common. Not that either know. (Thats a lie. Katsuki has seen him draw, but doesn’t comment. He’s a little impressed tbh.)

- As they get older, and he gets more stable with his quirk he just. Picks people up. Randomly. Todoroki in his way? Dat boi in the air and set down before he can blink. Iida ranting too early in the morning? Tossed over the shoulder and thrown on the couch with a very drawn out “shhhhhh”. Shoji cries the first time Izuku does it to him cuz he thought nobody could pick him up anymore. Piggy back rides are a regular thing by third year. Even Momo gets in on it. (They’re all low-key attracted by it, but no one saying shit.)

Bakugou

- Good artist. doodles mostly and doesn’t talk about it. 

- very big dog person. Cats are okay- he’d own one, yeah, but dogs are where its at. When he gets one later in life, people are shook by how well trained and affectionate the pupper is. 

- Tone deaf. No one takes him to karaoke after the incident.

- He likes?? Kids?? No one was expecting this when they went on a field trip to the elementary school. Kirishima kinda thinks its cuz he regrets what he did to Izuku, and is sorta trying to make up for it. 

- When no one is around, he listens to really soft music.

Todoroki

- By third year he is known as The Prankster. He’s gotten too comfortable. Everyone fears the 1st of April. Even Bakouga locks himself in his dorm. (The only ones safe are Izuku and Momo- but they help him in secret.)

- The sass master by second year. “Did you run all the way here?” “No, just briskly walking throws me into cardiac arrest.”

- Really likes small animals. Hamsters? Heck ye. Chinchilla? STOP HIS HEART WILL BURST. (But hes also scared he’ll accidentally hurt them. Sweet boi.)

- Ride or die friend. Will drive at two in the morning to wherever they hell u managed to land yourself at. Probably would help you hide a body too.

- This boy can’t figure out video games to save his life. Prefers chess and crosswords. (But will try to play for Izuku.)

- Surprisingly, he’s that one person always taking pictures. His phone is loaded with selfies of him and and his friends. The only physical evidence that he smiles. He carries a selfie stick around and no one lets him forget it (but he doesn’t understand why its so funny?? he likes taking selfies with his friends. :( )

Kirishima

- Unhealthy obsession with flower crowns. He has like 10 at his dorm that he wears around when they aren’t training. (He made them himself.)

- Rly good at comforting. best hugs. Well, after Shoji. Good listener. 11/10 would have as best friend. 

- Really likes fictional books. Especially action filled ones. Bakugou was v surprised when he was laying on his friend’s floor and looked under the bed to find. like. fifty books. They all have rlly colorful covers and outrageous plots, but Kiri will defend them to the ends of the earth.

- fav pass time is to just.. walk. Where is he? probs just walking around the school grounds. Has accidentally stayed out after curfew. Got an earful from Aizawa. 

Aizawa

- Makes some bomb ass tea. However, he prefers coffee or cocoa. Midnight regularly makes him brew the staff tea tho.

- Regularly daydreams about being a cat

- His apartment has one (1) picture hanging on the wall. Its of his cat. Mic gave it to him one year as a joke. The blond still cries a little whenever he sees it.

- he writes down and saves weird things his students say. He has enough material to make roughly 3 books filled with quotes. He’s planning to publish them when he retires.

Tokoyami

- Regularly gets attacked by birds. No. Really. It’s an actual problem. Birds are assholes.

- Both of his parents have regular human heads. His birth was very odd. And his dad couldn’t exactly accuse his mom of cheating, ya know? That would just raise so many strange questions.

- He’s not much of an animal person. The irony is not lost to him.

- Prefers hand-held games. He also joins Todo for chess usually. They are pretty evenly matched.


Part 1/ 2 / 3

Rebooting myself as an artist / Thx for feedback

I’ve read all of your feedback and taken a few notes. Much appreciated, thank you for both the feedback and the kind words.

I feel like I’ve strayed too far from my principles, and gone too far from the artists that i admire most, so it’s time to rethink this direction. It has been a while since I last felt “okay” (in the big, life-encompassing sense, but the everyday mundane sense), and maybe that is related. it’s been a while since I last felt good about my work, felt motivated, and felt proud and excited to share something that I had made. Mostly when I post it I’m just nervous about how many people will like it and share it, if there’s something that is (or can be interpreted as) problematic, whether it’s “marketable” or the “fits the theme” of my comics. It’s exhausting, and most of the time, I would rather not post it at all – more bad feelings than good.

My whole goal was to quit my day job, and I did, but frankly this is less fun than my day job was. At least at my day job I got to see and talk to other people instead of just sitting hunched over alone in a room.

Younger artists, take this as a counter-example of how you should do art, and perhaps how you should live life in general.

So, anyway I’m doing a big swerve. I’ll take the motivation and “science” that I used to become a popular artist, and direct it instead to becoming a very high quality and experimental artist. Not as many people will see or like my work, but that is a sacrifice I’m willing to make in order to become the type of content creator that I’d wanna follow. Like, I wanna look at my own work and go “Damn, that’s super good, who made that. I’m horny for that, and I’m horny for whoever made it. Yes please, more of that, thank you,” that’s what I wanna say. And at the same time, I will climb, tooth and nail, out of this emotional hole that I’ve been in.

Also, as a side note, the “internet leftists” that I riffed on a little while ago stopped bothering me pretty much as soon as I made it clear that I wanted to be left (haha) alone. I was kinda trying to provoke them anyway, by rolling with the “Enlightened Centrist” shtick (’I"LL SHEOW YUO’). Point being, they are decent people, and my apologies if I implied otherwise.

Edit: I’m still gonna be using this blog and making comics, just to be clear.

I just realized that no matter how hard you’ve been trying to keep a relationship or even friendship because you thought you could never live without them, it really is not worth it when this person caused you so much pain and the relationship was mostly one-sided and toxic. It’s very important to remind yourself that although you spent a lot of time with them, also had good memories and laughed a lot together, if there’s no or maybe bad communication, lack of trust and no understanding, then it is in fact NOT worth fighting for, believe me. So please love yourself and don’t feel guilty for leaving. You’re not being egoistic, it’s called self-love and your mental health matters

[Revised 11/1/17] Book Recommendations for Witches, Spellcasters, and the Curious

I periodically (usually once a year) make an updated post of my annotated bibliographies for witchcraft, magick, and divination studies. I recently noticed that I hadn’t done this in a long time! 

Since I’ve read a lot of new books in that time, and since many are worth adding, I thought I’d go ahead and post an updated list. 

I’ve added just ten new ones this time! Unfortunately, still, it’s getting quite long, so I’m splitting it into two posts - one for divination, and one for magick/witchcraft.  I will be tagging both as #long and #long+post because I realize this is pretty extreme in terms of length.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Of Witchcraft and Whimsy, by Rose Orriculum. Written by Tumblr’s own @orriculum, this is one of the best, most modern an no-nonsense Craft introductory books I’ve seen. It’s unabashedly up-to-date and self-aware in its portrayal of the contemporary Craft.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Spirit Conjuring for Witches, by Frater Barrabbas. Frater B. is a very learned and rather famous magician and witch. This book is mostly geared towards Wicca, but even if you’re not Wiccan, his techniques are innovative and interesting, many utterly unlike anything I’ve seen elsewhere.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after readingEnergy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Rider by Eric De Vries. Considered a classic on this subject, this book contains a lot of good information on making the jump across the Hedge, but with a lot of editorializing about “true witchcraft,” etc. A mixed bag, but still recommended.

To Fly by Night, edited by Veronica Cummer. This is an anthology about hedgecraft by many different authors. The essays vary in quality but there’s something for everyone, and the text doesn’t shy away from tough topics, either.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Practical Astrology for Witches and Pagans, by Ivo Dominguez, Jr. This book, unlike most astrology texts, won’t tell you much about interpreting a chart - instead, it’s an entire book on timing your magick with the stars!

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

A Handbook of Saxon Sorcery and Magic, by Alric Albertsson. I really enjoyed this little book, which focuses on older magical traditions common among the ancient Saxons. It is very much introductory, but worth a read for those new to those traditions.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

The Hearth Witch’s Compendium, by Anna Franklin. This book is essentially a recipe book for various home remedies and magical purposes. For the most part, it focuses on healing work, but there’s some great tips in there for making your own cleaning products and such, too. Highly recommended.

Magical Housekeeping, by Tess Whitehurst. This is worth reading if you keep your own house/apartment and are looking for practical magical techniques for cleanliness and inviting harmony into your spaces. It could be more detailed, but I enjoyed it.

A Kitchen Witch’s Cookbook, by Patricia Telesco. This is a recipe book. It is mainly geared towards Wiccans and those who celebrate the eight sabbats, but the dishes are tasty and sure to please anyone.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I havemajor issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

2

Painful, yes (well, to Starco shippers, at least), but also important. While the parallelism robs the development of their relationship of some subtleness, it’s also going to allow us to see how different people who wanted the same thing (even if at different times, and I can just pray Star deep down still would like it) are going to react and behave. 


Star was (is?) super good at running away from things, so she could just close her eyes and pretend things were not there for a while.

But Marco? His “blindness” mostly came from his tendency to focus too much on one thing at a time: first his crush on Jackie, then the sadness he attributed to his recent breakup. But now that he’s painfully aware about what’s truly eating at him (and possibly, retroactively, at what he felt in other occasions as well, from Scent Of A Hoodie, to possibly, Blood Moon Ball).

So… what is he going to do? Last time he was faced with a life changing realization, in Sophomore Slump, he was quick to turn his life around and go to Mewni, because the dork has a hell of a hard time with change, but once it happens he’s not one to wait around, and usually determined to give his best (from getting his red belt to being a good squire to Star). So what is he going to do now that he realized that he likes Star, and that staying around her might just end up hurting him? I don’t think he’s going to be able to pretend everything is okay until something big happens.

This also gave him, and possibly us viewers, a new perspective on Star’s actions in Lint Catcher (I don’t think it’s going to be addressed, though, since it doesn’t really need to be spelt out): she didn’t want him back at first not because she doesn’t enjoy his presence, and probably not even because she doesn’t like him anymore, but because she was scared about his return in her life undoing all the efforts she put in getting her life back on tracks, there on Mewni, after all the pain she had to suffer ever since she became aware of her impossible crush.

The Kendall Jenner x Pepsi Ad Made Me Want To Vomit

Before you do anything else watch this if you haven’t seen it already: 

Did you watch it? I hard a hard time making it through the entire spot myself without a few grimaces, “wtf were they thinking” faces and a “i can’t believe this shit” to a coworker. 

Let’s look at a few scenes to examine why this isn’t just the worst ad of all time but an ad that is insensitive, offensive and completely thoughtless. 

1.) Co-opting a movement 

Love

Join the conversation

Peace

These are all very nice sentiments and shit we should strive for every single day but they aren’t the typical signs you see at real protests. The protests where people are putting their safety in danger because they’re afraid they might walk outside with a hoody on and get shot, or that their family won’t be able to return to America if they board a plane to see their family in their native country are the images of protest people actually experience. The protestors certainly not as happy as the perfectly casted multi-racial group of actors walking down this very well lit street with no menacing or threatening police officers present any step of the way. Hell, they even found time to place pretty people to eat next to the protests while it was happening. The police aren’t in riot gear, apparently seeing no threat from this massive group of protesters singing and dancing their way towards them. 

Now look, I work in advertising for big brands™.  I know major corporations are risk averse and don’t want to alienate potential consumers who don’t share in what should be non-controversial views like equality and freedom of expression. But they are. But that’s why no one has ever asked a corporation to make a fucking resistance commercial. If you aren’t going to be on the ground with organizers and protesters, or helping to pay legal funds for those wrongly incarcerated or even at the very fucking least, providing food and beverages to people who are taking hours at a time out to speak out on something they believe in, then don’t use a movement for your own commercial gain. 

2- Tropes, (Un)intentional Racism, More Tropes 

All black people are good for in commercials are for hip hoppity dancing, tattoos, giving dap and staring lustfully at white women. 

All the people of color in this ad are mostly used to check boxes provide accent color to what is an otherwise whitewashed scene. 

This is an especially embarrassing lack of effort in representation when one considers the context in which the subjects are being portrayed. 

3- Our White Savior 

Ohhhh boy what in the actual fuck?!!?!

Another white woman swoops in to save the day. I wish Pepsi had Melania Trump’s number so that I can get past a few of the issues currently concerning me. 

I would’ve had a problem with this closing scene if it was from just about anyone but we’ll get to the actual ending in a bit. The fact that it’s a fucking Kardashian Jenner – the physical embodiment of wealth, entitlement and privilege in America – shifts this ad from just terrible advertising toward the realm of parody, absurdity and offensiveness. 

Do you remember the protests in Baton Rouge after Alton Sterling was gunned down by police officers? 

This is the lasting image of those protests. Ieshia Evans is walking up to a group of white police officers dressed like they’re ready to confront ground troops in Northern Iraq, and able at a moment’s notice to gun her down. 

The ending of this thing is even more absurd. Once Jenner hands the very peaceful policeman the can of Pepsi, the crowd goes crazy, like they were all Tyrone Biggums and it was time for the free crack giveaway. 

If I knew all I had to do to avoid being shot by the police while black was carry a Pepsi around with me, I would’ve been doing it this entire time. 

Your tired self, the 12th house

You act like your 12th house when your tired, so here are descriptions of the 12th house when tired:

  • Aries 12th: Gets overtired to the point of having too much energy or to the point of being unable to sleep. May also get grumpy when tired and easily agitated. Can get sarcastic and satirical. Can become bossy. 
  • Taurus 12th: Just goes to sleep for a long time. They don’t do “up ‘till 4am”. They need their fucking sleep and they’re going to get it. They also can get very grumpy when tired but they honestly don’t have the energy to start anything. May like falling asleep to the sounds of Nature or silence. 
  • Gemini 12th: May like to read or journal before bed, that’s what’ll get them tired. May become really anxious or on-edge when they haven’t gotten enough sleep. Either sleeps for a solid 12 hours or for only like 2h. Thinks a lot before falling asleep. 
  • Cancer 12th: Becomes moody af when tired. They need lot of sleep or they’ll remain that way. Probably has trouble falling asleep when away from home. Falls asleep thinking about a bunch of memories, mostly good but some not so much. 
  • Leo 12th: Becomes really full of themselves when tired. Also the kind of person to suddenly start complimenting people out of nowhere when tired. Either drinks when tired or is tired from drinking, likely wine. Actually needs a decent amount of sleep tbh??
  • Virgo 12th: Likes to fall asleep at whatever time feels most natural. Can be kind of an asshole when overtired. Like Taurus, may like to fall asleep to silence or to the sounds of nature. Doesn’t really get enough sleep tbh because they’re constantly thinking about a million different things. 
  • Libra 12th: Like Leo, they may fall asleep from tiredness brought on by alcohol, likely wine. They may like to listen to music before bed and could fall asleep thinking about a bunch or romantic scenarios. Quite pleasant when they are overtired and much kinder than usual.
  • Scorpio 12th: Probably thinks about some really deep shit before falling asleep. Being Taurus’ sister sign, they also need a lot of sleep. Can be very antisocial when tired. Probably has sex or thinks about having sex when tired. 
  • Sagittarius 12th: Probably the kind of person to Google a bunch of shit when tired. Watched documentaries when tired too. Is very chill when tired tbh. Probably imagines a bunch of adventures when falling asleep. Literally gets like no sleep tho. 
  • Capricorn 12th: Becomes very serious when tired. Knows they need sleep and gets it. They need to fall asleep to either silence of white noise. They really won’t take anyone’s bullshit when they are overtired.
  • Aquarius 12th: Is honestly probably still on Tumblr at 2am. They just don’t get sleep. Probably the friend that texts you wayyy too late at night and then gets annoyed when you don’t text back because you’re asleep. Get’s very… weird when they’re overtired. 
  • Pisces 12th: Sleeps. that’s it. For if they are even the slightest bit tired, that seems like the best option. Of course when falling asleep they’re probably thinking about the universe or some song that is stuck in their head. Somehow though they’re still tired even when they’ve gotten plenty of sleep??
Don’t buy into the false binary of verbal/nonverbal.

Some autistics are 100% verbal.

Some autistics are 100% nonverbal.

But plenty of us are semiverbal. Plenty of us are varying degrees of verbal. Some of us are mostly verbal, with periods of being nonverbal, or specific circumstances that will cause us to become nonverbal for a while. Some of us are mostly nonverbal, but will be verbal from time to time.

If you want to be a good ally to autistic people, understand that verbal status is not set in stone, and is not merely a dichotomy of verbal autistics versus nonverbal autistics.

Understand that verbal status does not indicate intelligence or willingness to communicate. Understand that verbal status can be very fluid. Understand that verbal status has no bearing on hearing status.

Every autistic person is different. Be wary of putting us into neat boxes. 

I think a big part of how I see the world is that -

In college I was sick. In particular I was anorexic, and I nearly starved myself to death. I never accomplished anything, made commitments I couldn’t keep, lost track of time, and struggled with the most basic life tasks. I was anxious (mostly because I correctly knew that everything was going horribly) and lazy (because I could not possibly do enough things to matter, and doing things was hard and hurt) and unreliable and terrible. I ended up owing people a lot of money (I have since paid them all back) and failing at things that were really important to me and to other people.

And now I am in a good environment for me. I live with people who I can be reasonably assured don’t hate me and will tell me when they need me to do things differently, and I am no longer anxious. My work has clear expectations and is bite-sized and doesn’t pile up on me, and I reliably deliver it and do a good job. I have enough money I don’t have to deal with the mental overhead of deciding whether to buy the food I want, and I spend that mental overhead on better things. I am still messy and I am still bad at getting places on time, but I’m never late on rent. I am mostly a productive, honest, trustworthy, reliable person and I’m getting better at those things. I have friends and kiss girls (and the occasional boy) and I make a positive difference in peoples’ lives.

Some of the difference was immaturity and lack of skills; much of the difference is that I had starved my brain until it stopped functioning; much of the difference was that I was in an environment that was not shaped to my strengths. But living through it gave me this powerful sense that the difference between a “lazy” person and a “successful” person, between a reliable person and an unreliable person, between a “good” person and a “bad” person, is a lot about whether they are in an environment shaped to their strengths. That almost everybody will be great in the right environment and really really struggle in a bad one. And some people have never ever encountered a bad one and think they’re just inherently great; and some people have never encountered a good one, and think they’re just inherently miserable and hard to get along with and unreliable and untrustworthy.

I absolutely think people are still accountable for the things they do in bad environments. I’ve worked really hard to fix the things I fucked up at when I was sick, and I don’t mean “it’s all the environment” to mean “it’s not you”. Just - the same you who was miserable and did bad things will be happy and do good things, in better circumstances, and lots of the human project is building those circumstances. 

I don’t know how to give everyone an environment in which they’ll thrive. It’s probably absurdly hard, in lots of cases it is, in practical terms, impossible. But I basically always feel like it’s the point, and that anything else is missing the point. There are people whose brains are permanently-given-our-current-capabilities stuck functioning the way my brain functioned when I was very sick. And I encounter, sometimes, “individual responsibility” people who say “lazy, unproductive, unreliable people who choose not to work choose their circumstances; if they go to bed hungry then, yes, they deserve to be hungry; what else could ‘deserve’ possibly mean?” They don’t think they’re talking to me; I have a six-figure tech job and do it well and save for retirement and pay my bills, just like them. But I did not deserve to be hungry when I was sick, either, and I would not deserve to be hungry if I’d never gotten better.

What else could ‘deserve’ possibly mean? When I use it, I am pointing at the ‘give everyone an environment in which they’ll thrive’ thing. People with terminal cancer deserve a cure even though right now we don’t have one; deserving isn’t a claim about what we have, but about what we would want to give out if we had it. And so, to me, horrible people who abuse others all the time deserve an environment in which they would thrive and not be able to abuse others, even if we can’t provide one and don’t even have any idea what it would look like and sensibly are prioritizing other people who don’t abuse others. If you have experiences, you deserve good experiences; if you have feelings, you deserve happy feelings; if you want to be loved, you are worthy of love. You flourishing is a moral good; everybody flourishing is in fact the only moral good, the entire thing morality is for. Your actions should have consequences, sure, and we should figure out how to build a world where those consequences are ones that you can handle, and where you can amend the things that you do wrong. When you hurt people, that can change what “you thriving” looks like, because part of thriving is fixing, and growing from, things you have done wrong; but nothing you do can change that it is good for you to thrive.

I reject that I ever deserved to starve, and so I reject that anyone, ever, deserves to starve. I reject that I ever deserved to suffer, and so I reject that anyone, ever, deserves to suffer. Happiness is good. Your happiness is good. And without a single exception anywhere I want you to thrive.

It’s something he was planning on saying all night but had been trying to hold in simultaneously. Now he says it, like breeze.

“Stay here tonight.”

Castiel turns around and looks at him. Dean thought he’d never see him again, but he’s back. Alive and real and Cas. Dean feels like he’s been constantly out of breath ever since Cas returned that morning, suddenly on the doorstep of Dean’s motel room.

Dean can’t quite seem to settle, unable to keep his eyes from Castiel. One moment, and he could fade.

“Why?” Castiel asks, curious more so than confused.

“Because,” Dean manages, “…because you’ve been gone, alright? You were dead, and we…. I thought we would never see you again. And I-” Dean’s voice falters. He walks over to Castiel and stands in front of him, his eyes gliding over his face. Every inch of him is real, solid, not like the dreams he’d been having. 

Sam and Dean had been getting separate rooms ever since Dean was awake for hours every night and just paced around the room aimlessly. When Dean slept, he’d been having dreams of Castiel being alive and he’d wake up and realize it wasn’t real. He’d rather not sleep than go through that every single night. But this, he wasn’t going to let this be a dream as well.

“Take off your coat, come on.” When Cas just frowns again, Dean does it himself. He slides the beige coat from Castiel’s shoulders and drapes it over the back of a chair.

“Dean, I’m fine with sleeping in the other motel room.”

“I’m not.” Dean rasps. “Please, Cas, don’t go.” Having Castiel around is worth sharing his emotions for. “Not again.”

Cas looks down. He looks different without his trench coat, more human. Maybe he is, in fact, a little more human. Castiel said he isn’t sure, and it’s how he’s been acting all day. Insecure. Dean can feel it whenever he looks at him, and that’s also what scares him.

“I’m sorry.” Castiel looks up to him. “I tried so hard, Dean, I tried so hard to live. For you, for Sam. I tried to stay with you and I failed.  I didn’t come back with a win for you.”

“Cas-” Dean grabs his shoulder, solid and real and warm. He looks in Castiel’s blue eyes and realizes how much he’d actually missed him. “Listen.” He begins unsteadily. “You coming back is a win for us, you hear me? You being here is enough.” Dean’s hand slides from Cas’ shoulder. “It’s all I wanted. And that’s why I want you to stay here tonight.”

“I don’t think I’m following.”

“Come on, Cas! What if you leave tonight and I come into your room tomorrow and you’re gone? What if something happens and you- you are gone for good? What if you die? What if- what if I can’t…” Dean curls his fingers into a fist. “What if I can’t let you go again?”

There’s something in Castiel’s eyes that change. It’s surprise, mostly, surprise and confusion and something Dean only recognizes from very few people in his life.

“The last thing I want is to leave another time,” Cas says. “And I- I understand now.”

Dean nods, suddenly empty where words should be, and swallows.

“Then stay. Come on, bed’s big enough.”

As Dean undresses in the darkness, with Castiel on the other side of the bed, Castiel suddenly speaks.

“Dean?”

Dean turns around, with his shirt almost off but still hanging on his neck and arm. He can’t see Cas’ face, but he can hear his breathing.   

“Yeah?”

“I love you, too.”

earth2diana  asked:

what are your favorite jealous yuuri fics?? ;)

If you liked my jealous!Victor list, get ready for these jealous!Yuuri fics… I love these fics omfg


Jealous!Yuuri


Look Only at Me by ThatDarnOtaku, Explicit, 3.3k
Yuuri overheard a conversation he shouldn’t and decides to take action. SPICY KATSUDON ALERT

Momentary Relapse by Chymaille, Gen, 1.8k
Being engaged to a living legend isn’t always easy, especially when your traitorous brain is always looking for an excuse to remind you that you don’t deserve him. On a date night, Viktor attracts once again the attention of a pretty girl and Yuuri doesn’t handle that very well. Thumbs up!

Even if I Tried by deathbycoldopen, Teen, 6.7k
His eyes flickered over to Viktor, then back to the ice. There was a different kind of heat invading his cheeks now, all too familiar and unwelcome. “Um,” he said quietly. “Mostly I just wanted people to feel good watching it.”
Lie. He’d only thought of one person. Great fic!

in which yuuri owns victor’s ass by kozumekenna, Explicit, 1.6k
Yuuri decides that it’s time to show his boyfriend’s fans who Victor really belongs to. WOOOOOW!

You’re My Favourite Of Them All by Grassepi, Gen, 3.3k
Viktor adores his fans. They’re everywhere- in China, in Europe, in Japan, the entire country of Russia… he’s always loved interacting with them, wherever they approached him. They support him, they love him, they throw him flowers and ask for pictures and autographs. Perhaps it wasn’t so surprising that he fell in love with one in the end. Love this!

Melting the Ice by fujoshikoi, Teen, 2.8k
What’s Yuuri’s problem? Victor wants to know. What is this feeling? Yuuri wants to understand. Definitely recommend!

Show Me by actualgayrobot, Explicit, 1.2k
Yuuri finds himself hot and bothered after his most recent Eros performance, wanting nothing more than some alone time in a private room to sort out his problems. He doesn’t plan to drag Viktor with him, it just kind of… happens. Spicy!

If you try sometimes, you get what you need by whosays_penultimate, Mature, 34k
After Viktor kissed Yuuri at the Cup of China, Yuuri closed off from a potential relationship, due to his insecurity and anxiety. Having decided Yuuri doesn’t want him, Viktor goes pleasure-seeking. After Yuuri finds him with another man, they decide to commit to each other and take things slow. They’re wildly different people, so will they make it work? Angsty but with a happy ending!

A Skating Scholarship by Viktorsfeet, Teen, 35k
In which Phichit and Yuuri are roommates and he has a hopeless crush on Viktor. Jealous!Yuuri AND jealous!Victor… enjoy!

i may be bad (but i’m perfectly good at it) by kxtsukiyuri, Explicit, 2.8k
Yūri loved Viktor. He really, truly did, with all his heart. But sometimes, Viktor could get a little too flirty at competitions, flitting from skater to skater with a sultry smile and well… Yūri wasn’t exactly pleased when that happened. So sometimes Viktor needed a little reminder who he belonged to.