the people are mostly good times

tealobjection  asked:

Do you have tips on writing fanfiction?? I'm actually trying to write a AA fic but it's just eehh

Hmm…I dunno if I really have any tips per se. I’m not a good writer, I just mostly jot down whatever comes to mind if it sounds interesting. But I’d say thats a tip in and of itself? If an idea sounds interesting to you, it could be a good starting point for a fic??

And be conscious of characterization. If it’s canon compliant, maybe go back into the games and review their speech patterns, attitudes, how they react to certain situations, things like that. If a character seems OOC, people will likely pick up on it. If it’s an au, take time to mold what kind of character you want the to become. What stays behind from their canon self? What’s different? When I wrote BV I wanted Apollo to be much more outgoing and sociable, but I kept his family issues and his ability to perceive – stuff like that.

When I write dialogue, I try to make it sound “real” by writing things the way I imagine actual people would say it. This also falls into characterization, bc you have to be aware of how each character speaks. Every character should have a unique voice that defines their character, and it’s a big part of storytelling! If two characters sound exactly the same, try to review if their character is coming out properly.

Most of my stories are pretty character-driven, so I’m sorry if this isn’t very helpful!

Hey nice pet people of the internet! My Grandma is looking to get a pair of budgies and came to me for advice (she had budgies in the past but that would have been a long time ago) but I mostly do fish and reptiles; I know very little about birds.

Can anyone recommend a good care sheet or website that has good information? We have been looking at cages online, just to see what is out there, and I also wonder if there are any in particular recommended for budgies? Bonus if they are pretty ornamental looking (the ones she likes are quite fancy but small) but that’s just icing.

[Revised 2/17] Books for Witches, Diviners and Spellcasters

Hi, everyone. A while back (a long time ago, actually), I started an annotated bibliography on books about witchcraft and magick, and I’ve updated it once (last November). 

Since then, I’d been keeping a list of things I need to add to it, but didn’t get around to actually reworking and updating the list a second time until today. Largely because I can’t really go outside much today because of the smog. But anyways, here it is. I’ve also included divination-related books in this version, whereas previously they were separate.

I hope you find something on here that suits your fancy! Happy reading! Also, yes, I do want to do more book reviews on this blog, so if you’d like a longer review of one of the books listed below, let me know and I can write one.

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after reading Energy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Hedgewitchery and Astral Travel

Ecstatic Witchcraft, by Gede Parma. This is actually probably my favorite book on this subject, even though hedgeriding is only a part of what the book discusses. The only bad thing I can really say about this book is that it’s really not recommended for beginners, and it’s helpful to have the basics of visualization already mastered (for example) before doing the exercises Parma recommends.

By Land, Sky and Sea, by Gede Parma. This book goes into even greater details regarding different ways of conceptualizing the cosmology of hedgeriding, and I find it a very refreshing book that appreciatively draws from a number of different perspectives while grounding itself, so to speak, with the overarching metaphor of land, sky, and sea as the three worlds.

The Temple of Shamanic Witchcraft, by Christopher Penczak. Penczak is usually a pretty mixed bag, and this book is no exception. It gives a lot of good practical information and a very in-depth exploration of the three worlds (a useful concept), but it’s primarily framed by Wicca, so it might not resonate with those of other faiths and particularly those who aren’t pagan at all.

Ascension Magick, by Christopher Penczak. There’s a chapter or two in this that address alternate ways of conceptualizing the architecture of reality, and it’s pretty helpful for a hedgerider. Beyond that, this book is mostly about ceremonial magick, but it’s a (mostly) good book. Certain parts (such as the bit about UFOs) are a little off, in my opinion.

The Shamanic Witch, by Gail Wood. This book is really best suited for someone who practices Wicca and, besides the background info and cosmological descriptions, is really only useful in the context of that tradition. If you’re Wiccan or willing to pick around a lot of Wiccan-talk, though, this is a good foundation.

Witches, Werewolves and Fairies, by Claude Lecouteux. It can be hard to find scholarly works on these phenomena that are affordable, but here’s one I personally enjoyed. It details many accounts of journeying experienced by both pagans and Christians in earlier times, and gives a good description of the concept of the astral double, the architecture of the soul, and other topics throughout history.

Betwixt and Between, by Storm Faerywolf. This book is mostly a guide to the Feri tradition of witchcraft, but while I myself don’t practice that, those who do seem to know a lot about hedgeriding! The book has several chapters on the subject and is highly recommended for this reason.

The Psychic Energy Codex, by Michelle Belanger. A lot of people have strong opinions about this author, but this is book actually provides a lot of good information about so-called “energy work” which can be a step in the right direction for those wanting to ride the hedge.

Psychic Dreamwalking, by Michelle Belanger. In this book, Belanger discusses, essentially, how to use your non-waking life as a vehicle to for journeying, and while I myself don’t usually dreamwalk, much of what she says applies to hedgeriding in other states, too.

Hedge Riding and Hedge Witchcraft, by Harmonia Saille. I only mention these two in order to say that they’re best avoided. Saille tries to give a comprehensive look at the phenomenon, but it’s poorly-written and overly New Age. The negative reviews of them on Amazon really cover the problems with these book in more detail than I ever could.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Tarot

The Book of Thoth, by Aleister Crowley. Make sure you actually own (or have access to pictures of) the Thoth deck before you dive into this. By far one of the best books on Tarot ever published. The prose is often dense and purple, but in this one book, Crowley teaches so much about Tarot and it’s connection to the Western Mystery Tradition. I can’t really say much more - it must be experienced.

The Pictorial Key to the Tarot, by Arthur Edward Waite. I recommend this book because it is a classic and was introductory for many older readers. It will teach you to read and gives insight into the methodology behind the Waite-Smith deck specifically, particularly his use of what are essentially parables and why he does this. Do not expect too much esoteric information, but read it anyways.

Seventy-Eight Degrees of Wisdom, by Rachel Pollack. This is the epitome of a good modern Tarot book and is really one of the first ones I’d recommend for someone looking for an accessible book on Tarot in a modern context. Very dense in information and history, yet altogether worth it. You’ll want highlighters nearby for this one!

Tarot for a New Generation, by Janina Renée. This is essentially a book for children and teenagers, but I do recommend it for them, specifically, because it is well-written, easy to understand, and helpful to absolute beginners.

Secrets of the Waite-Smith Tarot, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This book focuses just on the history, symbolism, and creative process of the Waite-Smith deck. It gives you an inside line on just what Pixie Smith was thinking when painting specific scenes, and is a great look at her life’s work, as well.

The Tarot: History, Symbolism, and Divination, by Robert M. Place. This book will not teach you to read Tarot, but does give an actual, accurate portrait of the history of the phenomena, which is incredibly important and useful. Know your history.

Understanding Aleister Crowley’s Thoth Tarot, by Lon Milo DuQuette. I hesitate to recommend DuQuette due to issues I have with his approach to Qabalah, but many people ask me for a beginner book for the Thoth Tarot specifically, and this is the closest I’ve come to finding one. I recommend reading this alongside, and not instead of, Crowley’s Book of Thoth.

The Back in Time Tarot, by Janet Boyer. This is more for the intermediate reader, and the entire book details a single, extremely useful technique for familiarizing yourself with the cards, namely by framing past events in terms of how they might appear in a spread.

Lenormand

The Essential Lenormand, by Rana George. This was not the first Lenormand book I picked up, but it was the most influential and intense. Ms. George writes in a personable, touching fashion and brings the concepts of the system home by relating them to life experiences in a way rarely seen. She is one of those authors I literally go all “fangirl” over.

Learning Lenormand, by Marcus Katz and Tali Goodwin. This is one of the better beginner books on Lenormand. I’m not going to lie - it isn’t as good as Rana George’s, but it definitely is worth reading if you’re completely new to the system. It’s very accessible, where some of the books I’ll be listing later in this can seem intimidating, or so I’ve been told.

Lenormand: Thirty-Six Cards, by Andy Boroveshengra. This book is intense, but in a different way than Ms. George’s. Expect to be inundated with information and techniques. Another one of those where you really need to take notes or highlight while reading, and read it multiple times.

Secrets of the Lenormand Oracle, by Sylvie Steinbach. This book is organized in a novel and useful fashion by topic, and gives specific techniques for readings on love, money, spirituality, and other topics. Highly recommended, and I tend to use it as a reference book nowadays, looking things up as needed.

The Complete Lenormand Oracle Handbook, by Caitlyn Matthews. Not for the beginner, nor the faint at heart, this one details a lot of what, to me, seem to be more advanced approaches and techniques. I use this book a lot, and I think anyone else will enjoy it, too. Good information on the connection between Lenormand and traditional playing cards, too.

Cartomancy with Lenormand and the Tarot, by Patrick Dunn. This is more of a special topic book, and best read after you’ve got some familiarity with both Tarot and Lenormand. It’s all about using them in tandem and the synergy between them.

Astrology

The Luminaries, by Liz Greene. I could really recommend anything by this author, but she’s written so much, and this book is a particularly important one. It focuses entirely on the Sun and Moon in astrology, and gives a good look at why the luminaries need to have a special place in your understanding.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Practical Astrology, by Priscilla Costello. This is focused, as you might expect, on actual interpretation of charts and less on theory, but it gives a good background on that, too. Was quite helpful in my attempts to interpret @xepsurah‘s unusual natal chart.

The Complete Book of Astrology, by Kris Brandt Riske. Very beginner, and very light on intellect, heavy on intuition. A great introduction, but I would not suggest it as the only book you read if you’re really interested in the subject.

Tasseography

Tea Leaf Reading for Beginners, by Caroline Dow. There are only a few books within Llewellyn’s immensely popular “For Beginners” series that I would recommend, and this is one of them. The symbol glossary (which makes up the bulk of the book) is the most useful part.

Tea Cup Reading, by Sasha Fenton. This book goes into some detail (quite a bit, actually) about the history of tea and coffee, and, better yet, how to prepare them in the traditional fashion! A lot of traditional lore is described, as well.

Scrying, etc.

Scrying for Beginners, by Donald Tyson. This is really a surprise find, as I don’t usually expect much from this series, by Tyson knows his history and goes far beyond simple exercises for scrying. He is a bit biased towards mirror and crystal-gazing techniques, but does discuss other methods.

Psychic Development for Beginners, by William Hewitt. Readable, and offers some very practical developmental exercises for those wishing to hone extrasensory abilities. Be prepared to sort through a lot of woo, though.

The Kendall Jenner x Pepsi Ad Made Me Want To Vomit

Before you do anything else watch this if you haven’t seen it already: 

Did you watch it? I hard a hard time making it through the entire spot myself without a few grimaces, “wtf were they thinking” faces and a “i can’t believe this shit” to a coworker. 

Let’s look at a few scenes to examine why this isn’t just the worst ad of all time but an ad that is insensitive, offensive and completely thoughtless. 

1.) Co-opting a movement 

Love

Join the conversation

Peace

These are all very nice sentiments and shit we should strive for every single day but they aren’t the typical signs you see at real protests. The protests where people are putting their safety in danger because they’re afraid they might walk outside with a hoody on and get shot, or that their family won’t be able to return to America if they board a plane to see their family in their native country are the images of protest people actually experience. The protestors certainly not as happy as the perfectly casted multi-racial group of actors walking down this very well lit street with no menacing or threatening police officers present any step of the way. Hell, they even found time to place pretty people to eat next to the protests while it was happening. The police aren’t in riot gear, apparently seeing no threat from this massive group of protesters singing and dancing their way towards them. 

Now look, I work in advertising for big brands™.  I know major corporations are risk averse and don’t want to alienate potential consumers who don’t share in what should be non-controversial views like equality and freedom of expression. But they are. But that’s why no one has ever asked a corporation to make a fucking resistance commercial. If you aren’t going to be on the ground with organizers and protesters, or helping to pay legal funds for those wrongly incarcerated or even at the very fucking least, providing food and beverages to people who are taking hours at a time out to speak out on something they believe in, then don’t use a movement for your own commercial gain. 

2- Tropes, (Un)intentional Racism, More Tropes 

All black people are good for in commercials are for hip hoppity dancing, tattoos, giving dap and staring lustfully at white women. 

All the people of color in this ad are mostly used to check boxes provide accent color to what is an otherwise whitewashed scene. 

This is an especially embarrassing lack of effort in representation when one considers the context in which the subjects are being portrayed. 

3- Our White Savior 

Ohhhh boy what in the actual fuck?!!?!

Another white woman swoops in to save the day. I wish Pepsi had Melania Trump’s number so that I can get past a few of the issues currently concerning me. 

I would’ve had a problem with this closing scene if it was from just about anyone but we’ll get to the actual ending in a bit. The fact that it’s a fucking Kardashian Jenner – the physical embodiment of wealth, entitlement and privilege in America – shifts this ad from just terrible advertising toward the realm of parody, absurdity and offensiveness. 

Do you remember the protests in Baton Rouge after Alton Sterling was gunned down by police officers? 

This is the lasting image of those protests. Ieshia Evans is walking up to a group of white police officers dressed like they’re ready to confront ground troops in Northern Iraq, and able at a moment’s notice to gun her down. 

The ending of this thing is even more absurd. Once Jenner hands the very peaceful policeman the can of Pepsi, the crowd goes crazy, like they were all Tyrone Biggums and it was time for the free crack giveaway. 

If I knew all I had to do to avoid being shot by the police while black was carry a Pepsi around with me, I would’ve been doing it this entire time. 

earth2diana  asked:

what are your favorite jealous yuuri fics?? ;)

If you liked my jealous!Victor list, get ready for these jealous!Yuuri fics… I love these fics omfg


Jealous!Yuuri


Look Only at Me by ThatDarnOtaku, Explicit, 3.3k
Yuuri overheard a conversation he shouldn’t and decides to take action. SPICY KATSUDON ALERT

Momentary Relapse by Chymaille, Gen, 1.8k
Being engaged to a living legend isn’t always easy, especially when your traitorous brain is always looking for an excuse to remind you that you don’t deserve him. On a date night, Viktor attracts once again the attention of a pretty girl and Yuuri doesn’t handle that very well. Thumbs up!

Even if I Tried by deathbycoldopen, Teen, 6.7k
His eyes flickered over to Viktor, then back to the ice. There was a different kind of heat invading his cheeks now, all too familiar and unwelcome. “Um,” he said quietly. “Mostly I just wanted people to feel good watching it.”
Lie. He’d only thought of one person. Great fic!

in which yuuri owns victor’s ass by kozumekenna, Explicit, 1.6k
Yuuri decides that it’s time to show his boyfriend’s fans who Victor really belongs to. WOOOOOW!

You’re My Favourite Of Them All by Grassepi, Gen, 3.3k
Viktor adores his fans. They’re everywhere- in China, in Europe, in Japan, the entire country of Russia… he’s always loved interacting with them, wherever they approached him. They support him, they love him, they throw him flowers and ask for pictures and autographs. Perhaps it wasn’t so surprising that he fell in love with one in the end. Love this!

Melting the Ice by fujoshikoi, Teen, 2.8k
What’s Yuuri’s problem? Victor wants to know. What is this feeling? Yuuri wants to understand. Definitely recommend!

Show Me by actualgayrobot, Explicit, 1.2k
Yuuri finds himself hot and bothered after his most recent Eros performance, wanting nothing more than some alone time in a private room to sort out his problems. He doesn’t plan to drag Viktor with him, it just kind of… happens. Spicy!

If you try sometimes, you get what you need by whosays_penultimate, Mature, 34k
After Viktor kissed Yuuri at the Cup of China, Yuuri closed off from a potential relationship, due to his insecurity and anxiety. Having decided Yuuri doesn’t want him, Viktor goes pleasure-seeking. After Yuuri finds him with another man, they decide to commit to each other and take things slow. They’re wildly different people, so will they make it work? Angsty but with a happy ending!

A Skating Scholarship by Viktorsfeet, Teen, 35k
In which Phichit and Yuuri are roommates and he has a hopeless crush on Viktor. Jealous!Yuuri AND jealous!Victor… enjoy!

i may be bad (but i’m perfectly good at it) by kxtsukiyuri, Explicit, 2.8k
Yūri loved Viktor. He really, truly did, with all his heart. But sometimes, Viktor could get a little too flirty at competitions, flitting from skater to skater with a sultry smile and well… Yūri wasn’t exactly pleased when that happened. So sometimes Viktor needed a little reminder who he belonged to.

wordmage-girl  asked:

Why do you want to fight Nicholas Sparks? And how would you challenge him (thrown glove, e-vite, etc)?

Thrown glove, definitely. This has to be PERSONAL, even though my problem with him is really everything he represents.

I have talked before about how his brand of dreck has basically killed the romcom, but I don’t think I’ve talked about why I hate his brand of dreck, so gather around, chickadees, for “How do I hate thee, Nicholas Sparks? Let me count the ways.”

1. Tragedy porn. Look, honestly, I liked “A Walk to Remember.” Mostly because of “Only Hope” and Shane West’s face, but I liked it (if I watched it today, even divorced from the whole of Sparks’s canon, I would hate it, but that’s a separate issue). But as time went on and I watched a couple more of his movies and then heard about the others, it’s just … look. I know that we make stories to make people feel a certain way. We want to elicit an emotional response. And that’s a good thing, you know? And I know I rail about darkness and sadness a lot, but I’m not even saying that stories should only try to elicit good emotions. That feels shallow.

But with Nicholas Sparks and other tear-jerker-type stories (see: reasons I never got into Grey’s Anatomy, reasons I’m more likely to read straight-up darkfic than what people call “sads”), the emotional manipulation is incredibly blatant and formulaic and … I don’t know, is “cheap” the word I want? I don’t see the point in a story that says “Here’s a thing you love. Fate is going to take that thing you love from you. The main character is going to lift their chin like Scarlett O’Hara and say ‘tomorrow is another day!’“ I don’t feel like it’s something the creator is sharing with me, I feel like it’s something they’re trying to do to me, and I don’t take kindly to that.

2. White Cis Hets Touching Foreheads.

3. His whole brand is marketed to women, books and movies both, they’re chick flicks, date movies, stuff For the Women, but he sure is a dude. Not that men aren’t allowed to write romances, but it’s just that slimy feeling of “a wise man making money off all those silly weepy romantic women” rather than “a wise man showing that it’s okay for both women and men to cry over a love story where tragic things happen.” Like. Nora Roberts sure doesn’t have this kind of franchise. And I can’t say I enjoy reading Nora Roberts, but one could excise the sex from her books and make movies and market them to women, but somehow nobody got to be a romantic-book-adaptation juggernaut until Sparks. Partly because he’s a man and partly because

4. Happiness Isn’t Art. There seems to be this implication that because things end badly, because they’re sad, because they make you cry, it’s okay that they’re romantic. The sadness makes sure that they’re art. And fuck that, honestly? Tearjerkers are fine, whatever, they can (and should, I don’t want to stop people writing for the genres that appeal to them) exist in the world even if I don’t want to consume them, but nobody in this world gets to tell me that the unhappiness elevates them higher than the romcom. That it’s better than Nora Roberts not because he’s a man but because the sadness makes it somehow more worthy.

5. Look at that face. Tell me you don’t want to punch that smug face.

6. Sometimes you just read a book or watch a movie and know that the person behind the story is ideologically opposed to you in pretty much every possible way.

Just to sum up, I guess … I’m a person who loves reading and writing love stories. I always have been, since I was a little kid. If there’s tragedy and difficulty along the way, sure, I’m willing to go along with that, but when there’s someone who consistently says “no, this is only worthy if I take happiness away from you, because happiness isn’t art, because romance is only worth of attention if tragedy interrupts it,” then I get ready for a fight. And since he’s very much the trend leader there, I am pretty much ready to meet him in the pit at all times.

the-wonderpegs-agenda  asked:

"Accidentally capture the wrong base"? .....tell us more? Please?

this was before we got agent agent back as our handler, and part of the reason why he finally turned up for work again. 

so the thing about clint is that hes 1. not a good listener and 2. hes deaf. mostly. these are separate issues because being mostly deaf doesnt stop him from understanding what people are saying most of the time, it just means that you have to be sure he knows youre trying to communicate with him before you say something. (and also that you should make sure your mask doesnt cover your mouth so he can lipread, but whatever.)

we had this agent—incredibly boring guy in the worst sort of way–who’d requested clint, nat, and i for an op. nat and i were supposed to hit two of the leaders of a crime syndicate while clint got the third. easy peasy, kill some guys, free some hostages, small country liberated, total cakewalk. but the agent running the op and the briefing took FOREVER. he was talking us through like none of us had ever overthrown a country before, explaining every minute detail. nat and i could just kinda zone out and let things wash over us, picking up the pertinent details, but clint cant really do that. his hearing aids help but they weren’t perfect, so he also had to be kinda lipreading just to keep up. which takes a lot of focus for incredibly boring info. naturally he zoned out too.

which was how he missed the fact that his guy was not actually staying in his incredibly fortified base-slash-villa. his hostages were, but he wasn’t. 

luckily, they covered this in the briefing packet we were each provided with, which was a mere 362 pages. 

so obviously none of us actually read it.

we poked through, got blueprints, guard schedules, alarm systems and so on, but didnt bother with most of the rest of it. 

they dropped us in the air over each of our respective targets, clint last. i had the cliffside resort, nat had the downtown headquarters, and clint had the base-villa. nat and i handled ours like pros, of course, corpses everywhere, and clint did too–mowed right through the security, got the hostages, and then called in that his syndicate leader wasnt there, what the hell, who gave me this bad intel.

which was when he was informed that the big bad wasnt IN the villa, he was on the ISLAND ACROSS from the villa, and that hed been supposed to covertly infiltrate the beach house there and quietly capture him. ideally without ever setting foot in the villa; he was just supposed to steal a boat from the villa docks and not get spotted by security. 

unfortunately, clint had blown up all the watercraft at the villa’s docks to keep syndicate members from escaping. which meant he still had to get to the island and capture this guy, but now there were no motorboats left. and if this syndicate jerkoff got away, fury was gonna have his hide.

and thats how clint wound up launching a one-man amphibious assault on an international crime syndicate from a paddleboat.

and also why clint reads his briefings now. 

other ways to give feedback for fic writers

as a fic writer and someone who has some form of social anxiety (and therefore is really nervous of commenting), here are other things you can do as a reader:

- reblog! not only is this feedback, it also provides a very much needed exposure for writers and their fics. tagging the post would be even cooler, but if you aren’t comfy with that, just pressing the reblog button can help writers a lot.

- recs! you can make a post about your favorite fics, or find fics to rec when your friends/someone you follow ask for them, or even just randomly drop recs in their askbox (e.g. “i found this lovely fic, here it is if you want to take a look *inserts emojis*“). if you don’t have a tumblr, you can simply share via anon asks. i’m pretty sure every fic writer will squeal or at least internally scream with joy when they realize someone’s rec’d their works. this is also one of the only few ways fics get promoted.

- kudos! i have mixed feelings about kudos, mostly because i’m self-deprecating and (wrongly) view them as ‘you’re good but not good enough’ - but they’re important as well. some people tend to look for fics by the kudos count (min. x kudos, for example), either because they don’t have the time or it’s just their thing (though please try to not do that as much so non-‘big name’ writers have a chance). if you enjoy the fic you’re reading, smash that heart button thingy.

- bookmark and public bookmarks! this shows that you enjoy their fics and would like to keep them (perhaps so you can reread in the future?). some people comb through others’ bookmarks as well, so there’s always a chance they’ll click on the fics you like.

- private or anon messages/asks! if you’re not comfortable with leaving comments publicly, there’s always this option. most writers have their inbox open and will readily get excited with you. (seriously, grab a writer and just yell at them (ง •̀_•́)ง)

types of ships
  • gigantic deluxe cruise: 34705 search results on everywhere, dominates the fanzine market, badass edits with lots of heart-wrenching quotes since they’re probably the main characters. author probably shipped them as well, tbh. usually the “opposite personality” pair, overused tropes, nicknames, etc.
  • modest viking longship: has been there since the beginning of time, always appears as a side ship in fics, especially those with all the main cruises in one universe. yet has surprisingly little main fics considering how the characters basically aren’t shipped with anyone else but each other.
  • the “aww” submarine: that non-mainstream pair whose fanart pops up on your dash once a while. everyone lowkey ships them in a ‘in another universe where my otp didn’t exist’ way. see: “I don’t get why don’t more people ship xxx!” actually, they do.
  • the sturdy fishing boat: usually clashes with one of the mainstream ships. people either ship them, think they’re good as they are now, or oppose them with a passion. with enough supporters it may upgrade to a bigger fishing vessel, garner quite a bit of attention and start discourse with the cruise oppressors. mostly stays in their waters and are chill if u don’t insult them
  • the driftwood: tinier than the piece of lumber that jack and rose couldn’t hold on to at the same time. you need wood? you make wood. EMPHASIS: usually consists of couples that would theoretically be good together since a) they are minor characters and b) they have had zero interaction
  • the lone canoe: most perplexing of all. these characters are well known, have decent interaction, yet are never shipped together. when it is suggested people frown upon you as they are deeply rooted within their prejudices, but convert someone and you will be much more satisfied with the content than poor driftwood.

Hey maybe we should go back to liking video games we want to like and maybe stop harassing people who like them or shaming people for liking certain games. It’s been pretty bad on on this website lately and I see a lot of people feeling bad for liking games or being excited for games that others keep bringing down. Be nice to each other. Let people be excited and happy if it isn’t harming anyone.

Seungbae, The Hero?

After chapter 23, I feel like I need to write about Seungbae from an unbiased POV. Let’s see what kind of a person Seungbae really is. Is he the hero of the story?

Reasons why Seungbae is a good cop:

1. He’s strict about law.
2. He’s focused on his job.
3. He’s good at remembering and connecting the details.
4. He wants to do good.
5. He’s motivated.
6. He has a good instinct.

Reasons why Seungbae is a bad cop:

1. He breaks the law when he thinks it’s convenient while expecting others to always obey the law.
2. He indeed ‘makes up stories’ often (even if they are true) because he relies on gut feelings a lot rather than logical, solid evidences.
3. His obsession with Sangwoo for petty reasons.
4. He considers himself above the law and better than everyone else.
5. He’s edgy and mentally unstable.
6. He got demoted once before.
7. He gets physical/violent when things don’t go his way.
8. He abuses his authority as a police officer.

Things Seungbae has done wrong as a cop:

1. Abusing his authority to get what he wants.
2. Lying to get into someone’s house and without a warrant.
3. Hiding evidences from his superiors.
4. Secretly investigating a ‘case’ without telling his superiors about it.
5. Pressuring/trying to manipulate someone into giving him the black box (even though black boxes are private the person could decline).
6. Threatening/blackmailing people into giving him what he wants.
7. Peeking into someone’s property (and ‘linger/loiter’).
8. Stalking.
9. Assaulting another police officer
10. Hacking his superior’s computer.
11. Using his police badge illegally to force people into giving him information.
12.
After seeing the footage of Sangwoo assaulting someone, he was not concerned about that person’s safety but he’s still obsessing over Sangwoo.
(Some of these are from @ikemen-in-suitslist)


Why Seungbae seems like a good guy:

Between Bad and Worse and The Worst, he’s the bad!
People who work in the police department are constantly slacking off and are pretty much useless. The only person who’s trying to do his job properly is Seungbae. So despite all the unlawful, wrong things he’s done, he seems like a good person because everyone else is horrible.
And the reason fans also see him as a saint is because he is constantly being compared to a serial killer. ‘So if Seungbae doesn’t kill people brutally, he must be a good guy.’ (?) But he is indeed trying to do good.


Is Seungbae really a smart cop?

No!
All the evidences he’s found so far were by luck. The hair happens to be from Sangwoo’s house and belong to Bum. The driver who was speeding happens to be Sangwoo, he happened to see them and so he managed to get his black box. Whether he’s getting closer to the serial killer or not, Seungbae’s approach is very comical and illogical. A normal, good officer would connect the solid, logical evidences together to find the killer. But what Seungbae is doing is placing the one person he’s obsessing over - for trivial reasons and because of his gut feelings - in the middle and trying to connect all the crimes to him instead. He’s going backwards.

He remembers a case from 3 years ago, his first thought is “It could be Sangwoo’s work.”
He finds a black hair on his foot (which is a pretty common color in Asia), his first thought is “It must be from Sangwoo’s house.”
He finds out a girl is missing, he doesn’t suspect any of her friends but “What about Sangwoo?”
He finds out a guy is missing, his first thought, “It could be Sangwoo’s work”
He talks to witnesses, his first question “Do you know this guy? Oh Sangwoo?”

There are millions of people out there doing suspicious things. Why does Seungbae just assumes Sangwoo must be the killer and even goes as far as to investigate it? His evidences are nothing but gut feelings, guesses and luck. So no, I think being smart and having a good instinct are different. He’s a pretty lucky guy!

“…he’s smart and really good at connecting the dots. people say he’s a bad cop but he has to do some wrong things in his situation to be able to do anything at all!“  

This is an ask I got I’m going to ignore the sarcasm that was in the beginning, anon >_>.
This is true. As I already mentioned, he is indeed good at connecting the dots but what are the dots? Are the dots solid evidences or just gut feelings again? Yep, mostly gut feelings.
He suspected Sangwoo because he makes him uncomfortable.(!) He doesn’t like how calm Sangwoo is and as he mentioned before, Sangwoo creates different atmospheres every time and so Seungbae considers him a liar! Again without any solid evidence.

Conclusion:

Seungbae is not a hero but as for his role in the story, it seems like, he’s supposed to be a flawed hero (an anti-hero) and not a good person. At this point it seems like he will find out about Sangwoo and his crimes because he has a very good instinct. But when he does, he will probably be all alone, there won’t be anyone to ‘save’ and there’s a surprise waiting for him. Two killers instead of one.

Things Not to Do in a Tarot Reading

Originally posted by korilakkuma-say


Most readings go over great! However, there is definitely some level of etiquette expected. Here’s a list of some things that can instantly turn a reading sour!

For the Querent…

💎 Be Disrespectful. This should really go without saying. If you’re getting a reading, treat them with respect! They are providing a service just like anybody else you would give money to. Even if they’re doing it for free, they’re still taking time out of their day to help you out.

💎 Cram Questions. Typically, it goes one question, one card, with more cards providing more insight or addressing different facets of a single question. It makes a reader’s head ache when someone purchases a single card draw, but sends the reader a billion questions. They’re trying to get the insight of a ten-card spread for basically a dollar, and from the reader’s end it feels like they’re being slighted. It’s simple: if you want more insight and more detail, choose a reading that fits your needs.

💎 Fight the Reading. There are two ways people do this: fighting the message, and fighting the reader.  In the first, if the cards say something the querent doesn’t like, and they get upset, trying to get the reader to “fix” their answer. This mostly comes from people who wanted a tarot reading for self-affirmation, rather than insight into a problem. If you want a feel-good tarot sesh that’s fine; be sure to either purchase a reading designed for that, or let your reader know you’re not up for bad news right then. The second comes from fellow readers! The reader will be going about their business and the querent will say, “I read tarot and that’s not what that card means.” It may seem like a kind gesture at first, but not all decks have the same meaning for every card and the reader’s intuition and unique interpretation are just as important as the card. If the meanings were set in stone for every card, we wouldn’t need to go to other readers!

💎 Treat the Reader Like a Hack. Skepticism is understandable. Skepticism is completely fine! A lot of skeptics end up getting tarot readings either for the novelty of it, or because their friend dragged them into it. It’s okay to approach a reading with a healthy amount of reservation, waiting to see what’s in store before totally investing in it. However, there’s a line between being skeptical, and being a jerk about it. Don’t spend the whole time trying to “expose” your reader as a fraud, constantly critique on how vague or not they’re being, and just steamrolling over the message they’re trying to give you so that you can feel superior somehow. It doesn’t make you look like a hero, it makes you look like someone I impersonate with an annoying voice to my friends over dinner.

💎 Ask Questions that are Clearly Out of Line. Tarot can get pretty heavy sometimes. A lot of experienced readers have at least one story of someone who really opened up to them about dark subjects, and they worked through it together. A lot of different subjects are acceptable, but some just… really aren’t. My friend had a querent approach him online, all but straight-up saying they were meant to be together and asking for a reading about their future. I’ve had people approach me asking for me to diagnose their illness. If you have a question about a potentially triggering subject, please please ask your reader if they are comfortable reading for that topic before just unloading a graphic description on them. Also, don’t hit on your reader. It’s the occult equivalent of hitting on your waitress.

For the Reader…

💎 Minimize the Querent’s Concerns. This person came to you with a question in mind, and is putting their trust in you. What seems trivial to you may be a big deal to someone else! If someone approaches you asking what they can do to bond with their cat more, don’t make them feel silly for choosing that question; that’s their prerogative. If they’re concerned enough about it to get a tarot reading, maybe there’s more to it than meets the eye!

💎 Judge Their Question (to their face.) I won’t say “don’t judge them at all,” because often that’s impossible. We’re only human, after all. Let’s say your querent is considering leaving their long-term relationship for a sketchy but passionate fling. You might think this person has garbage priorities, but I promise any lecture you feel like giving them, they’ve already heard. They’re not paying you to nag or bestow your personal ethics onto them. They’ve already done whatever they’ve done, and now they would just like some insight before moving forward. It’s not a reader’s job or a reader’s place to place moral judgement on a reader. (It’s a lot like being a therapist… everything is neutral and confidential, unless there’s evidence of abuse or potential harm to the querent or someone else. If the querent did/is doing something illegal, that’s a different matter.)

💎 Be Disrespectful. Again, this should go without saying. Our querents deserve a little dignity! It’s okay to laugh with them, should the atmosphere allow for it, but never laugh at them. A querent’s feelings are perfectly valid and should be treated as such. They are not inherently foolish or less wise than you, so let’s all agree to not present ourselves as these sages of wisdom helping the poor little mortals.

💎 Half-Ass It. Someone is actually giving you literal money! We get that you’re tired. We get that you hate the question, but literal shapeshifting master of darkness Aku could kick down the door to your Tarot Shack, slap down a five dollar bill, and ask for a reading on his love life. You would still be ethically obligated to actually try and give a reading based on what the cards say, and in a reasonable amount of depth that someone who doesn’t read tarot would feel like they got a sufficient amount of insight. Basically, you’re offering a service. Give it your all!

Originally posted by verona7881

I just realized that no matter how hard you’ve been trying to keep a relationship or even friendship because you thought you could never live without them, it really is not worth it when this person caused you so much pain and the relationship was mostly one-sided and toxic. It’s very important to remind yourself that although you spent a lot of time with them, also had good memories and laughed a lot together, if there’s no or maybe bad communication, lack of trust and no understanding, then it is in fact NOT worth fighting for, believe me. So please love yourself and don’t feel guilty for leaving. You’re not being egoistic, it’s called self-love and your mental health matters

F*ck you, pay me…

Apologies for the length. The revenge is sweet though.

I was a contractor with a small business (Company X) that did consulting and other services for bigger companies. I usually worked directly with these bigger companies and was operating largely as a direct employee of Company X, though not on site.

I enjoyed the work but some of the people at Company X were d*cks. Just petty nonsense like talking shit about me in meetings, and for no reason that I could discern. All their clients loved me; I was good for business. They were just being d*cks, like d*cks do. It didn’t matter. Since I was working mostly with Company X’s clients, I didn’t have to spend much time communicating with the d*cks.

Every month I sent my invoice to Company X, and the terms were they had 30 days to send payment. At some point, they promoted their main accounting guy (one of the d*cks, henceforth, D*ck Accountant) and hired a Deputy Accountant, who was put in charge of satisfying invoices, such as mine.

Keep reading

Tegus originated in South America, where they’re a lot more tolerated than up north. Now, these scaly motherfuckers are pouring into Florida, where they were imported by exotic pet breeders to sell to hapless owners who realize too late that this Chamber Of Secrets resident isn’t the best companion, and proceed to set them loose into the wild. One person alone is known to be responsible for releasing thirty of these bastards into the Florida wilderness, where they’ve started breeding out of control, as Florida’s climate makes it a hospitable environment to both reptiles and eldritch horrors. Now they’ve started showing up on the properties of people who often mistake them for small alligators, which is apparently no cause for alarm among Florida homeowners.

And these critters, straight out of a bad 80s horror movie, aren’t going anywhere. Each female can lay up to 35 eggs per year and experts say it’s impossible for them to estimate how many of them are already out there. They hide underground in the winter, emerging in the spring like Satan’s hunger made flesh. They mostly roam on land, but, like any good swamp monster, can lurk underwater for long periods of time if need be. Their population is highest in the Miami and Tampa Bay areas, but they’ve been spotted as far as Panama City. That’s right: They’re moving north.

7 Horrifying Pest Infestations You Had No Clue Were Possible

Taylor Mason

I am really excited about Taylor Mason’s appearance in Showtime’s Billions.

Here’s Showtime’s behind the scenes introduction of Taylor on YouTube, with interview snippets with the actor and the writers.

I don’t know the show at all. It is definitely not my usual genre. No one does any science or magic, you know? It’s a fast-paced businessy financey drama thing. I don’t even remember how I found out, but when I heard that Billions claimed to have the first ever nonbinary character on TV… well, to be honest, I kinda did a skeptical face. The articles are all very US-centric, and explicitly nonbinary characters are not uncommon in some parts of the world. And anyway, “nonbinary character” usually means “gender non-conforming binary character” because that’s usually the best we can hope for. But yeah, I was interested, so I looked into it.

Here’s my TL;DR: Billions is the first mainstream US TV show to my knowledge that contains a character overtly described as nonbinary and whose they/them pronouns are stated in the show and affirmed by almost all of the other characters.

We’re introduced to Taylor, played by Asia Kate Dillon (also nonbinary, they/them pronouns), in the first episode of season 2 - toying with another character about being vegan. They’re a sharp, brilliant, think-outside-the-box intern.

In episode 2 it gets a bit more in-your-face:

That guy in the second shot, Bobby Axelrod, is the very rich, very arrogant boss of macho boy’s club Axe Capital. And he just accepts Taylor’s assertion of their pronouns, no questions asked, no raised eyebrows. Just, “okay.”

Taylor proceeds to seriously impress the very rich arrogant boss guy in the chair.

Taylor isn’t going through some coming out plot, working out their gender and discovering themself. Taylor is out and comfortable and confident in their identity. People who refuse to accept them get bulldozed, either by other characters or by the plot itself.

Later in that episode there’s a scene in which Taylor isn’t present, and Taylor is misgendered by that bald guy, Bill:

It’s hard to capture the tone in this scene. It’s an alpha male showdown, over a nonbinary person’s pronouns. The arrogant guy who misgenders Taylor gets corrected, and then has two guys above him in the pecking order stare him down until he concedes, in body language and facial expression. Taylor’s rich white old guy boss is not gonna tolerate you misgendering them. (Over the next few episodes it becomes clear that Taylor is replacing Bill as Axelrod’s “favourite.”)

Bobby Axelrod upholds the pronouns of every singular-they nonbinary person in this one scene, to everyone watching the show. After that the conversation continues as before. It all happens very naturally as part of a conversational plot to take down a business rival, like it’s important and yet no big deal at all to correct a colleague’s pronouns.

There are people watching this who are nonbinary and going “wow, that’s me.” There are nonbinary people who haven’t worked themselves out watching this and going “wow, maybe that’s me?” There are parents of nonbinary kids watching this and going, “wow, maybe using new pronouns isn’t so hard? Maybe my child is not just going through a phase?” There are nonbinary kids watching this with their parents, thinking “maybe now my parents see Taylor being taken seriously they will take me more seriously.”

This is incredible.

Naturally, I have concerns. I’ve got them on the back-burner because one TV show is not a pattern among TV shows. It does, however, fit a known trend of nonbinary visibility.

Taylor is white, AFAB, thin, young, wealthy, able-bodied, and masculine-presenting. They fit the nonbinary cliché so well that I can’t even find any deviation from it. In reality nonbinary people are very diverse in pronouns, gendered presentation, race, body type, and class. But when newspapers are interviewing these “new” and fascinating nonbinary people, they always seem to choose people mostly like me: white, thin, AFAB, young, apparently able-bodied, androgynous-to-masculine-presenting. (I’ve been interviewed by journalists for articles about nonbinary people that then didn’t even include me in the final piece, because I refused to be seen as a representative of nonbinary people in some way.)

Taylor is also autistic. I don’t know if it’s deliberate, goodness knows writers create accidentally autistic characters all the time, but if you know what to look for in TV-autism it’s really really clear. And people really like to draw attention to the way autism and gender non-conformity overlap, to the extent that articles have been written by and focusing on doctors who believe that some gender non-conformity is directly caused by autism and should not be treated. (Article link. Warning: Daily Mail, general awfulness, etc.)

So going forward, I’m hoping that if and when there are more nonbinary people in TV shows we get to see some femininity, some differing body types, some people of colour, etc. I’m also hoping that we get to see some nonbinary people who are not obviously autistic - characters who express emotion freely and are not somehow brilliantly sharp and intelligent and innovative in one particular area of interest, for example.

But for now, I am thrilled. A TV show is portraying someone like me. In this case I’m lucky because I fit that autistic nonbinary cliché down to the ground, and I am perfectly represented in a mainstream US TV show for the first time in my life. I want other nonbinary people to experience that too, and this is a huge step forward and a long-deserved validation of the nonbinary community. I am excited to see what happens next for nonbinary representation and visibility.

MBTI on a long weekend

DISCLAIMER: all true things that may have happened ʕ•ᴥ•ʔ

INFJ
- Saturday: re-reading old msgs, wondering if their friend is mad at them but not sure how to bring it up and discussing it with close friends
- Sunday: finally blackmailed into leaving the house by an extrovert
- Monday: willingly left the house to see fireworks, enjoying the aesthetic of watching them solo

INTJ
- Saturday: plays in a competitive strategic game tournament (e.g. chess, sports, esports), takes home 1st place relentlessly
- Sunday: does not sleep in, wakes up, and proceeds as usual on a Sunday
- Monday: 50/50 chance of sleeping in, would prefer to spend the day being a closed-off hermit but fam barges in and drags INTJ out

INFP
- Saturday: binge-watched a new Netflix original and isn’t ready to talk about the emotional and psychological trauma inflicted by the finale yet
- Sunday: scouring the internet for info and details on the show they just watched, re-blogging everything related to the show only to be recommended another one to watch by a total stranger on Tumblr
- Monday: hasn’t eaten in 17 hours from a sudden surge of creativity and they’re 5 chapters deep into a fanfiction they’ve written about their favourite pairing

ISFP
- Saturday: at an art show enjoying the experience, talks to the artist afterward, and quietly wonders if they’ll ever leave their mark on the world
- Sunday: dabbles in a couple of activities, supports a friend at a concert, attends a chill afterparty, and doesn’t notice they’re being flirted with which is really cute
- Monday: after days of incubation, inspiration takes hold and ISFP basically drops off the face of this earth — they’re moved to Japan, rooming with a friend, please check up on them

ISFJ
- Saturday: bakes the most heavenly tasting cookies anyone has ever tasted and befriends all of the neighbours/neighbourhood pets/random birds and deers
- Sunday: mass, always
- Monday: gathers family together for dinner, ISFJ is always the best cook

ISTJ
- Saturday: Saturday routine (I.e. wake up, shower, breakfast, read/write/schoolwork, lunch, music rehearsal/sport practice, dinner, chill, sleep)
- Sunday: Sunday routine (I.e. fam time, friend time, me time)
- Monday: finally gets to sleep in

INTP
- Saturday: absorbing Wikipedia through an IV until fam kidnaps INTP for a long weekend trip
- Sunday: enjoys the sights, rebels in small ways, wishing they were alone but weird fam members and random strangers keep the trip interesting
- Monday: sleeps in, exhausted AF, in no mood to converse with anything that requires oxygen to functiom or has 2 or more legs, will sleep anywhere until they get to their bed, in which case they’ll revisit their good friend Wikipedia

ISTP
- Saturday: hitting up the city, doing whatever they want, flirting, eating, dancing, interested in new experiences and noticing new people who can provide it
- Sunday: hermit - working on an independent project no one knows about
- Monday: ISTP is nowhere to be found, until their Instagram reveals that they went to the Arctic to film penguins for National Geographic

ENFP
- Saturday: went Mexico for the weekend, told nobody about wanting to go but somehow drags 2 friends with them across the border
- Sunday: their Instagram pics are all tagged in Mexico but their Facebook update says they’re in Disneyland partying it up with Mickey and Minnie
- Monday: they show up to work by accident and immediately leave for a hike at the national park, only to get lost with their friends and get flirted with by the park ranger

ENTP
- Saturday: low key attends a wedding and somehow wedges his way into the speaker’s list, makes jokes about the groom at his expense mercilessly just to get the crowd energy up
- Sunday: working on a lip sync dance battle YouTube project with friends, spends all day goofing around, and cracking jokes
- Sunday: hermiting the whole day at home to edit the video in time for Monday, king of memes and procrastination as always

ENFJ
- Saturday: tutor kids in need on weekends, not for the money but because ENFJ lives off the praises of the parents and is waiting for the moment when the student tells them they’re ‘so cool’
- Sunday: summons all their introverted friends out to play via black magic to come a long weekend party ENFJ is hosting
- Monday: runs into a friend while doing errands, the conversation somehow becomes about the friend’s abusive relationship, prompting ENFJ to suggest that they go somewhere to eat right now so the friend can pour over all the details over brunch and sangria

ESFJ
- Saturday: running a community fundraiser, spends their time mostly luring people they know to buy their baked goods and by chatting with friendly elderly during their 1pm walk (all of which ESFJ know by name), somehow raises $5000 from a bake sale
- Sunday: designated day to spend time with SO, brunch with drinks, quick hike through the local park and taking cute pictures together to remember these moments
- Monday: helping to host a neighbourhood block party at their cul de sac, making sure the music isn’t too loud, getting volunteers to stay on task, having fun meeting new people and spending time with friends

ENTJ
- Saturday: works overtime on Saturdays, doesn’t mind as long as they’re getting paid, task isn’t too meaningless, and it needs to get done, gets drinks with co-workers at the end to loosen up (it’s Saturday after all)
- Sunday: high key runs a business on the side, spends the day at business lunches, knows how to push a deal effortlessly
- Monday: plans with loved ones, highly structured, lunch at 11, freetime until 4, dinner party with friends At 5, sleep at 10, ready to wake up and go back to work for 8, just the way ENTJ likes it

ESTJ
- Saturday: long weekend cottage party that low key doubles as a networking session, leaves with new contacts and a job interview, not bad for a Saturday
- Sunday: designated date with the bae, doing couple things but mostly helping each other solve problems at work, always pushing each other to strive for higher, often called “high powered couple” and secretly likes it
- Monday: attends a charity ball, delivers a solid handshake to everyone they meet, bae in tow, both relishing at all the possible contacts they will make at the party, never forgets what charity the ball is raising awareness for

ESFP
- Saturday: dance dance dance dance dance dance dance dance dance dance dance dance
- Sunday: stays hydrated, goes to the gym to work on that body, makes a new friend by chatting with their treadmill neighbour, invites new friend to happy hour tonight, gets asked out right as they are leaving the gym
- Monday: rooftop patio bar, takes shots for their Instagram and their liver, soaking in the last of the long weekend with friends, the city, and a rooftop of fun loving strangers

ESTP:
- Saturday: away at a cottage, shenanigans ensue erupting in chaos for thr TJs, knows how to get what they want, gets yelled at by park ranger for causing a disturbance, always sleeps with something with 2 legs or more at night
- Sunday: sneaks out of the cottage early morning to look for animals, finds a bear, accidentally hikes through entire forest and is found by the park ranger (sent by friends who reported ESTP lost), and ESTP finally returns to their friends
- Monday: ESTP leaves the cottage by themselves at 7am, stops by the park ranger lodge to ask them out, catches a flight to Japan, and low key bumps into ISFP

anonymous asked:

Not su critical, but I wish there was less human episodes and plot's loose ends weren't left forgotten for literal ages. I just, idk, feel like crewniverse wants us like lars or ronaldo too much

i mean, by definition it’s not forgotten if it’s brought up again. the show is just very long-term and demands you have a lot of patience sometimes (which makes it satisfying when it happens, but it can also be frustrating before that).

on the subject of humans: i’m not always super invested, but there’s always a rewarding or clever element. i like connie, kiki and sadie a lot. greg’s alright. the cool kids too. while onion’s not my favorite, his episodes tend to be solid and gives us interesting steven-characterization (onion gang was quite nice, they finally made me emotional about both onion and steven’s loneliness).

i have a buddy who loves lars with all his heart - i know he’s not the most popular character, but i like him alright, too. he’s the kind of teenager who can be a jerk without being a one-note bully. there’s a good post going around about you kinda need to see the humans to feel the payoff of them (spoilers) seemingly getting kidnapped in this next bomb, which will be another interesting mix of the human and magical elements of the show.  

Originally posted by cartoonfan98

the “slice of life” elements also has another important function, which i think is vitally important - in fantasy / sci-fi stories, there’s a lot of Othering. by which i mean, strictly good vs evil escapism where a lot of the time, the enemy is so inhuman they might as well be a natural disaster, not a person. good and evil is often decided by which magical species or alien race you belong to, not who you are as a person. 

slice of life is the complete opposite - you have your jerks, but they’re still human. those stories rarely end with anyone being murdered for their crimes and this being portrayed as a “victory”. it’s pretty common that while the main character’s perspective expands, we get to know even those characters who we assumed were just cruel or bullies. everyone has some struggle going on, and the punishments for their crimes are not that they’re irredeemable or die. rather, they’re allowed to actually develop and/or have nuances to them.

Originally posted by relatablelarsquotes

both sci-fi and fantasy also have an expectation of war in recent years - there’s the expectation of constant high stakes and people getting killed. the plot is expected to constantly be the focus - we need to find the Thing to fight the Dark Side. we need to get to Place before Evil gets there first. the Chosen One needs to collect all five Orbs, four of which symbolize the four friends, and the fifth one will awaken her own power. the Enemy needs to be Stopped, their reasons are (usually) irrelevant.

on the other side, slice of life is very personal: everything is character-driven, and their motivations is the main reason to watch it. i saw a lot of surprise that “yuri on ice” didn’t have a traditional villain - my response was basically “…well, yeah, it’s slice of life”. that’s kinda how it usually works. especially in anime - you may not get to know every character equally well, and some will be deeply flawed, but no one is sorted into a box labelled “inhuman” or “evil”. 

so what’s my point? well, steven universe continuously trains its audience to see slice-of-life elements in the ~magical space conflict. it tells you to see the characters through a ‘human’ lens, even the characters who aren’t human. part of how it does this is by adding surprising amounts of empathy and human solutions - not just to the beach city problems, but to the gem problems as well. 

the first time we see two diamonds together - the Intergalactic Tyrants™ who most fanart depict as the final boss overlords all the “less-awful” characters will unite against in a Final Battle? oh, they’re grieving the loss of their fellow diamond. blue diamond is crying. their pearls are there, standing as a reminder of the hierarchy they champion, but neither element ruins the other - they can be sympathetic and deeply flawed at the same time. when it’s towards the people they care about, they even seem well-intentioned. yellow diamond chastises blue for not being a good leader to her people.

Originally posted by gemsingifs

part of the reason this seems natural is because the show has portrayed its human characters as flawed, not as a faceless mass of “good people” who must be saved from the evil alien race. so it makes sense it would work the other way around too - everyone’s got their own stuff to deal with, and everyone makes (sometimes massive) mistakes. 

we’re expected to see both gems and humans as people. part of this is because of the human side of steven’s upbringing - the old crystal gems are used to meeting allies and enemies, steven is mostly used to meeting people, even if he (like everyone) has his own biases between them, or thinks some of them are “mean”.

despite some people’s consistent insistence that any jerk we’re introduced to is just a villain, that’s it, end of story, steven universe continues to challenge those assumptions. time and time again. that’s part of why it’s so vital (to me) that no one are just killed off or bubbled forever, because the show has laid the groundwork that every life is unique, and suffering is never a good thing. 

it can be a trade-off, like how we’re exploring rose’s shattering of pink diamond, and yknow, there WAS a war in the style of sci-fi/fantasy, but the show is critical of that solution. pink’s shattering did not, in fact, end the conflict - her death left countless gems leaderless, mourning and FAR from ‘liberated’ (in fact, many of them hate the crystal gems), and earth was still under the slow threat of the cluster… and how was that cluster solved again? not by force, but by talking to a hostile and vicious little green alien. then getting her help to reach the huge, suffering eldritch abomination in the center of the earth… which was also stopped by communication, not by force.

Originally posted by kathon

the human side of the show helps steven cope with gem life, make connections that are important to him, develop his character and fuel his desire to help.

i know some will insist these are unrelated, but i think without steven’s human side, he would really “just” be another crystal gem. an empathetic one, who is curious about people, but not on this level. not one who opposes the idea of not just shattering, but wants to find a way to connect with everyone (as he is like no one and everyone), and has the kind of boundless optimism where he refuses to accept that this is just “the way things are”, or that suffering is ever necessary. everything is always changing on earth, and because of that, steven wants to believe everything can always change. 

Some live-action BATB headcanons (mostly about Lumiere and Plumette’s wedding because I’m a sap):

  • Prince/Beast is bi or pan (”…his parties with the most beautiful people,” “…and earn their love in return”).
  • Before the spell was broken, the members of the staff who were able to move throughout the castle would relay messages between Cadenza and Garderobe from time to time.
  • Lumiere and Plumette get engaged soon after they become human again. Lumiere had promised her it would happen once the curse was lifted, and sometimes talking about their possible future was comforting to them.
  • Lumiere makes Cogsworth his best man, mostly because he’s very organized, but also because it means he’ll have to give a toast and admit that Lumiere has good points.
  • Chip is the ring bearer.
  • Cadenza plays the processional music, and Garderobe sings for their first dance (okay I’m going by modern wedding customs, I don’t know if any of this is how they did it in 18th century France). 
  • Lumiere cries when he sees her in the dress.
  • So does Cogsworth.
  • Everyone’s crying or almost crying during the vows, mainly because they thought there would never be a chance for this to happen.
  • When the officiant says “You may now kiss the bride” he hasn’t even finished the sentence before Plumette grabs Lumiere’s face and kisses him.
  • The Prince insists on throwing them a huge reception in the ballroom and basically invites the entire town (LeFou goes with his new boyfriend, of course).
  • Plumette has a dance with Chip and he’s standing on her feet the whole time and it’s adorable.
  • Everyone keeps saying how Plumette is the most beautiful woman there (and let’s be real, she is). Lumiere can’t take his eyes off her and he keeps smiling because he’s so ridiculously in love with her and he can’t believe his luck.