the oklahoma city bombing

Get Over It
  • Get Over It
  • Timothy McVeigh
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A message from Timothy McVeigh to his victims. This recording is from the interviews Lou Michel conducted with him in prison to write American Terrorist.

I had no hesitation to look right at them and listen to their story, but I‘d like to say to them, I‘ve heard your story many times before. The specific details may be unique, but the truth is, you‘re not the first mother to lose a kid. You‘re not the first grandparent to lose a granddaughter or a grandson. I‘ll use the phrase, and it sounds cold, but I‘m sorry, I‘m going to use it, because it‘s the truth—get over it.

On This Day in History

April 19th, 1995

Timothy McVeigh executed what is now known as the Oklahoma City Bombings. He bombed the Alfred P. Murrah Building. There were 168 confirmed deaths.


April 19th, 1999

Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold went to Outback Steakhouse for dinner. The following day they would shoot up their high school, killing 13 others and injuring 24. They would later kill themselves.

Whether you wish to admit it or not, when you approve, morally, of the bombing of foreign targets by the U.S. military, you are approving of acts morally equivalent to the bombing in Oklahoma City.”

- Timothy McVeigh, who detonated a truck bomb in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995.

Timothy McVeigh, the terrorist behind the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing, dressed in army camouflage. McVeigh graduated from U.S Army Infantry School in Georgia and used much of his spare time to read about firearms, sniper tactics, and explosives. McVeigh was reprimanded by the military for purchasing a “White Power” T-shirt at a Ku Klux Klan protest against black servicemen who wore “Black Power” T-shirts around the army base.

An Extra Leg

The 1995 bombing of Oklahoma City’s Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was a devastating terrorist attack that killed at least 168 people. Among the dead was 21-year-old Lakesha Levy, a member of the Air Force who was at the building to pick up a Social Security card. After Levy’s body was buried, a severed leg was found in the rubble of the building. FBI tests found that the decomposed leg belonged to a black woman. A footprint determined that it belonged to Levy, even though she’d been buried with two legs.

Her body was subsequently exhumed, but officials were unable to determine just where this mystery leg came from. The body’s DNA had been destroyed by the embalming process. According to Oklahoma medical examiner Fred Jordan, “We don’t have a body to match it to. It’s something we haven’t figured out yet.”

Timothy McVeigh was responsible for one of the worst terrorist acts ever committed by an American citizen, the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995. McVeigh was raised in a rural community in upstate New York after his parents separated in 1978. A loner in high school McVeigh enlisted in the army in 1988 and rose through the ranks to platoon leader. In 1991, after winning a Bronze Star in the Persian Gulf War, he failed to complete Green Beret school, and this failure increased his dissatisfaction with the government.

Although McVeigh was never linked to militant antigovernment groups, he soon began planning revenge for the deaths that occurred during the Waco Siege. He had been present at Waco when the siege was occurring and felt that the government was responsible for the deaths. He enlisted the help of his friend from the army, Terry Nichols, and together they took steps to build and place a bomb at the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, as McVeigh mistakenly believed the government order for the waco assault had originated from there.

On April 19th, 1995, McVeigh parked a rented Ryder truck at the north side of the Federal Building, and minutes after, a fertiliser and fuel oil bomb exploded, immediately collapsing about a third of the building and killing 168 people. McVeigh was convicted of the crime and was executed by lethal injection in 2001.

APPARENTLY THEY DON’T TEACH ABOUT OKLAHOMA BOMBING IN SCHOOLS   Timothy McVeigh’s anti-government resistance is today the mainstream ideology in Republican party

On April 19, 1995, a pair of former U.S. Army soldiers parked a rented Ryder truck packed with explosives outside a federal building in Oklahoma City. The blast killed 168 people and injured more than 500 others, and the attack is the worst homegrown terror attack on American soil.
The bombing came only two years after the first attack on the World Trade Center.
Former U.S. soldier Timothy McVeigh was convicted on 11 counts of murder, conspiracy and using a weapon of mass destruction in the blast, and was later executed. The other ex-soldier, Terry Nichols, was convicted on similar charges and sentenced to life without parole, because the jury deadlocked on the death penalty. The two were motivated by contempt for government, the hatred sharpened by the 1993 federal raid on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas