the ocean is six miles deep

Oliver Tate: Ask me how deep the ocean is.

Jordana Bevan: Shut up.

Oliver Tate: Come on, just ask me.

Jordana Bevan: Why?

Oliver Tate: ‘Cause I know the answer.

Jordana Bevan: Oh! Do you?

Oliver Tate: Yes, I do.

Jordana Bevan: How deep is the ocean?

Oliver Tate: I’m not gonna say.

Jordana Bevan: I’m brokenhearted.

Oliver Tate: The ocean is six miles deep.

Jordana Bevan: Good.

Submarine, 2010

6

When I was a kid, whenever I’d feel small or lonely, I’d look up at the stars. Wondered if there was life up there. Turns out I was looking in the wrong direction. When alien life entered our world, it was from deep beneath the Pacific Ocean. A fissure between two tectonic plates. A portal between dimensions. The Breach. I was fifteen when the first Kaiju made land in San Francisco. By the time tanks, jets, and missiles took it down, six days and 35 miles later, three cities were destroyed. Tens of thousands of lives were lost. We mourned our dead, memorialized the attack, and moved on. And then, only six months later, the second attack hit Manila. Then the third one hit Cabo. And then the fourth. And then we learned this was not gonna stop. This was just the beginning. We needed a new weapon. The world came together, pooling it’s resources and throwing aside old rivalries for the sake of the greater good. To fight monsters, we created monsters of our own. The Jaeger program was born. 

2

“Ask me how deep the ocean is.

 Shut up.

 Come on, just ask me.

 Why?

‘Cause I know the answer.

 Oh! Do you?

 Yes, I do.

 How deep is the ocean?

 I’m not gonna say.

 I’m brokenhearted.

 The ocean is six miles deep.

 Good.”

              - Submarine (2010)

Imagine you’re underwater.
Imagine you’ve got a tower of hearts–
one stacked on top of the other:
every soft-smile-on-the-subway you ever loved.
So the ocean is six miles deep,
and you’ve got this lifeline
straight to the surface.
But the catch is,
you have to touch them.
The catch is,
you have to hold that love in your hands
for the first time since the last time
you swore you got over it.

You would drown.

The thing about heartbreak
is it feels too big for your body.
You become cavernous–
a walking Mariana Trench.
Nobody knows how deep you go, because
the pressure is heavy enough to fold skeletons
into paper cranes, and naive enough
to call this beautiful.
All those people who tried
to love the empty out of you,
they didn’t know they were kissing
deep sea monsters–that you had giant squid
in your belly, that your lips were the lure,
that your hands were the teeth,
that you could blue ringed octopus
your arms around them and drag them
to the deep.

So you loved more like a pelican eel
than a person. And you’re still trying
to outrun the heartache that your heartache
set fire to. But this is a burning house with
no doors, and
no windows,
suspended in the middle of all that empty
in your chest.
But you will put that fire out
with the oceans on your tongue.
You will put it out if it means
jumping headfirst into the hurricane–
you will do it even if it means a lifetime at sea.
You will do it if it means saving yourself,
even when you had no intention of surviving.

I am ready to go down with the ship,
but I will not take you with me.

—  SURVIVOR’S GUILT, by Ashe Vernon

if there is anything that I have learned from watching the movie based on the book “Submarine”, is that YEAH, marriages fall apart because sometimes two people aren't meant to be and you end up learning from them. and maybe they work themselves out or they dont, either way there isnt much you can do even if your thoughts/actions/or feelings are pushed into the situation, those two people will decide in the end what the best is for everyone, especially for themselves. The 2nd thing I learned from this movie, is no matter how naive you might be like Oliver’s character who doesnt know what hes doing half of the time, you can meet a girl who treats you like absolute shit, weather you become their best friend and are ignored and are told not to involve emotions because they are “gay” (which doesnt sound like a bad idea actually), you end up trying everything to make them happy even if they blow everything off that you do for them, even if you are there for all of their problems and try to help them out, even if that involves straying away from them so they can figure themselves out. If they actually wake up, see and realize what another person has done for them, and is willing to keep doing for them no matter how much it hurts, if that possibility is there to make things right… then maybe it wont matter so much what they do for them, but that they are there to make it right, and are there to be with you till the very end.

but then again, maybe I wasnt supposed to get this kind of message from the film. Im pretty sure most people will say that the story doesnt give of this kind of vibe at all, this is my opinion of it tho, along with a phew different ones. I guess you’ll just have to watch it and give your own different thought on it.

you can keep walking into the ocean, ill take one step ahead of yours just to show you how far im willing to go into the deep for you.

the last scene made me think that.

I badly wanted to paint some clouds and sea so you know. :) Based on Submarine, one of my favorite books and a beautiful movie with an incredible soundtrack!

“Ask me how deep the ocean is.” “Shut up.” “Come on, just ask me.” “Why?” “‘Cause I know the answer.” “Oh! Do you?” “Yes, I do.” “How deep is the ocean?” “I’m not gonna say.” “I’m brokenhearted.” “The ocean is six miles deep.” “Good.”


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When I was a kid, whenever I’d feel small or lonely, I’d look up at the stars, wondered if there was life up there. Turns out I was looking in the wrong direction. When alien life entered our world it was from the deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, a fischer between two tectonic plates. A portal between the dimensions, a breach. I was fifteen when the first Kaiju landed in San Francisco. By the time tanks, jets and missiles took it down, six days and thirty five miles later, three cities were destroyed. Tens of thousands of lives were lost. We mourned our dead, memorialized the attack, moved on. And then, only six months later, a second attack hit Manila. And then the third one hit Cabo, and then the fourth. And then we learned, this was not gonna stop, this was just the beginning. We needed new a weapon. 

3

In 2005, the Cassini orbiter discovered huge, 125-mile-high geysers spraying from the south pole of Enceladus, a small and icy moon that orbits Saturn. Since then, scientists have speculated where the geysers draw from—and whether that water source might be home to some form of life. The most intriguing idea was that the geysers indicated the presence of a subsurface ocean. Later, the discovery that the plumes contain water vapor, nitrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and other chemicals associated with life made the geysers even more exciting. 

Now, new data has confirmed that Enceladus does indeed have an ocean, and it’s buried beneath 25 miles of ice at the south pole. The ocean appears to be about six miles deep and may be as large or larger than Lake Superior.

Saturn’s Moon Enceladus Has an Ocean, And It Could Be Habitable

Oliver: Ask me how deep the ocean is.

Jordana: Shut up.

Oliver: Come on, just ask me.

Jordana: Why?

Oliver: ‘Cause I know the answer.

Jordana: Oh! Do you?

Oliver: Yes, I do.

Jordana: How deep is the ocean?

Oliver: I’m not gonna say.

Jordana: I’m brokenhearted.

Oliver: The ocean is six miles deep.

Jordana: Good.

—  Submarine
9

Oliver Tate: Ask me how deep the ocean is.

Jordana Bevan: Shut up.

Oliver Tate: Come on, just ask me.

Jordana Bevan: Why?

Oliver Tate: ‘Cause I know the answer.

Jordana Bevan: Oh! Do you?

Oliver Tate: Yes, I do.

Jordana Bevan: How deep is the ocean?

Oliver Tate: I’m not gonna say.

Jordana Bevan: I’m brokenhearted.

Oliver Tate: The ocean is six miles deep.

Jordana Bevan: Good.