the musician comes first

What do I know?

Archie Andrews x Reader

I thank Ed Sheeran for this cause it’s perf for our little Archiekins. Enjoy!


Sitting in the student lounge, Veronica, Betty and Kevin sitting on the couch, Jughead sitting on the arm of it, Archie sitting on the chair as I sat on the arm of that. Everyone was still focusing on Jason’s murder and I get it’s important and it’s scary knowing that persons still out but what about the world we’re living in today. “What about religion? Politics? The fact that there’s still marches going on because of how the government is wanting things how they want them. What about the people who live here? Aren’t we entitled to a say in everything? We vote for a better everything but it’s all lies, they know what to say to make people vote and it pisses me off that no one lives up to their end of the bargain” Everyone falling silent at my sudden out of the blue rant. I had enough, why is no one talking about these problems?


“You’re a genius!” Archie, grinned jumping from his seat, quickly gathering all his papers and guitar case. “I could kiss you right now” Opting to kiss my cheek before running out of the room. All of us confused at his eagerness. “It’s looks like the girl next door may have just inspired the boy next door” Ronnie, smirked knowing that since I moved to Riverdale 3 years ago, I’ve been crushing on Archie Andrews and that kiss, even though it was just on my cheek and was mainly friendly on his part, had my face the same red as a tomato.


Archie had locked himself away for the last few days preparing for the talent show and warned us that even though he’s terrified to get on that stage he wants all his closest friends there. So here we were sitting in the auditorium watching Ronnie perform with the Josie and pussycats and she wasn’t kidding when she said she could sing like a knighting gale. Smiling at V, as she took the empty seat beside me as I sat with Mr Andrews and Mrs Lodge, we patiently waited for our Archiekins to come on stage and show everyone how talented he is.

Ain’t got a soapbox I can stand upon But God gave me a stage, a guitar and a song My daddy told me, “Son, don’t you get involved in Politics, religions, other people’s quarrels.”

The smile on my face was bigger than ever.

I’ll paint the picture, let me set the scene I know when I have children they will know what it means And I’ll pass on these things my family’s given to me Just love and understanding, positivity

We could change this whole world with a piano Add a bass, some guitar, grab a beat And away we go I’m just a boy with a one-man show No university, no degree But lord knows everybody’s talking ‘bout exponential growth And the stock market crashing in their portfolios While I’ll be sitting here with a song that I wrote Saying love could change the world in a moment But what do I know? Love can change the world in a moment But what do I know? Love can change the world in a moment

I could feel the tears behind my eyes at how proud I am of Archie but also because maybe, just maybe I had inspired the ginger boy, sitting on the stool with his guitar to sing about more than heartbreak.

The revolution’s coming, it’s a minute away I saw people marching in the streets today You know we are made up of love and hate But both of them are balanced on a razor blade

I’ll paint the picture, let me set the scene I know, I’m all for people following their dreams Just re-remember life is more than fittin’ in your jeans It’s love and understanding, positivity

This boy was mesmerizing and he doesn’t even know it. More songs like these and he could be the biggest musician and the first one ever to come out of Riverdale.

We could change this whole world with a piano Add a bass, some guitar, grab a beat And away we go I’m just a boy with a one-man show No university, no degree But lord knows everybody’s talking 'bout exponential growth And the stock market crashing in their portfolios While I’ll be sitting here with a song that I wrote Saying love could change the world in a moment But what do I know? Love can change the world in a moment But what do I know? Love can change the world in a moment

I’ll paint the picture, let me set the scene You know, the future’s in the hands of you and me So let’s all get together, we can all be free Spread love and understanding, positivity

We could change this whole world with a piano Add a bass, some guitar, grab a beat And away we go I’m just a boy with a one-man show No university, no degree But lord knows everybody’s talking 'bout exponential growth And the stock market crashing in their portfolios While I’ll be sitting here with a song that I wrote Saying love could change the world in a moment But what do I know? Love can change the world in a moment But what do I know? Love can change the world in a moment But what do I know?

I could swear that every time he sang that line his eyes were bore into mine, never breaking the connection until he would start it all over again. The whole auditorium standing as we clapped for the boy I am in love with, Archie taking a bow a huge grin on his face. Pushing my way through all the standing bodies, I jogged my way to the hallway of the auditorium wanting to finally tell Archie how I feel.

“I can’t believe you actually listened to me” I spoke, as Archie walked the short distance towards me, coming out of the auditorium a few minutes after me. “You inspired me, not only to open my eyes and mind but to put it in a song so it does the same for others” Smiling, taking one of my hands in his, stroking my knuckles with the pad of his thumb. Looking up from our hands, Archie’s eyes were already on me. “Archie” I almost whispered looking into his beautiful eyes, my free hand caressing his cheek. “Love can change the world in a moment but what do I know?” Archie whispered, gingerly placing his lips on mine, soft and gentle but sweet.

3

The Colorful Masks and Music of Lightning Bolt Drummer @chimpendale

To see more of Brian’s colorful creations, follow @chimpendale on Instagram. For more music stories, head to @music.

Brian Chippendale (@chimpendale) is into masks. There’s the blue balaclava-like one that stretches out over his face, and the magenta one attached to two giant severed teddy bear heads. These days, Brian prefers his “tiger mask,” a multicolored stitched shell he wears while drumming for his band, the noise-rock duo Lightning Bolt. Inside it is a contact microphone, which picks up all the guttural vibrations, rumblings and sweat that accumulate during a show.

“Wearing a sweat-soaked rag on your head an hour a day helps dispel inhibitions,” says Brian, over the phone, about his facial disguise. “It’s funny because people are just like, ‘It must be so disgusting.’ But I wash it every night that I play.”

Washing may disinfect it, but it doesn’t keep it intact. The more laundry cycles it goes through, the more it starts to shred and fall apart, the more it begins to turn into another one of Brian’s growing pile of tattered creations.

The Rhode Island native’s tradition of designing and wearing his own costumes began some time in the 1990s. Back then, he and a group of artists were shacked up in a warehouse in Providence known as Fort Thunder, a collective art space where they played shows, drew comics and held wrestling matches. Then some developers came in and tore the place down to make way for a parking lot. So Brian packed up his stuff and, after living in a new space for a couple years, eventually moved down the road into the third floor of an old mill, which serves as his current home base.

“I miss Fort Thunder days in the same way I miss my 20s,” says Brian. “But I am also really happy where I am in my life now. If I had the option to go back, I wouldn’t. We had like eight cats and one litter pan. It was pretty ridiculous in its filthiness, and [there were] tons of roommates, which is so awesome and horrible at the same time.”

Brian is an artist-musician, or possibly a musician-artist. It’s hard to say which comes first. Drawing a comic comes just as easy to him as providing a steady backbeat on his two-decade-old kick drum. His group Lightning Bolt began in 1995, around the time Fort Thunder was getting off the ground. Since then, the duo has released seven official records, including its latest, Fantasy Empire. The new album has the same piercing dissonance and guitar shredding from the group’s previous efforts. But this one sounds crisper, due to the band utilizing the full digital technology of a studio for the first time.

The music wasn’t the only thing they approached with a fresh perspective. Lightning Bolt album covers, which are handled by Brian, have always included bursts of color. But this one is more minimalist––a black-and-white collage redrawn with a small pen.

“A lot of our covers are these colorful, aggressive things,” he says. “For this one I wanted to go for more of an atmosphere and an air of mystery.”

Like all of his projects, Brian worked on the cover while parked in his current studio in Providence. The building spans almost a city block –– 8,000 square feet (743 square meters) of wood and brick and a broken elevator, which makes loading gear for tours a bit of a pain. But the space is very much his own. There’s a room full of shredded paper for collaging, a room for silk screening, a room to record Lightning Bolt material and several rooms to draw in. There are also spaces filled with junk and other knickknacks he’s dragged up there over the years.

“An old roommate came over here once and started rummaging around in some room that I don’t really go to,” he says. “He pulled out an entire windsurfing board and I had never even seen this thing.”

The building switched hands a few years ago to a new landlord, but unlike Fort Thunder, Brian doesn’t think he’ll be kicked to the curb any time soon. There’s too much stuff to get him to leave –– art materials and toys, a couple of printing presses and his drum set, and maybe even that two-headed bear suit from the Fort Thunder days, languishing in some hidden corner in a box. Worst-case: If he gets evicted, Brian will just set up shop somewhere else.

“I am an artist and a musician just because I can’t do anything else and I won’t do anything else.”

–– Instagram @music

Stars set for charity monologue show

A host of stars are to take part in a charity show this weekend, performing monologues dramatising the true stories of children growing up in South Africa.

Nicole Kidman, Benedict Cumberbatch, James McAvoy and Josh Hartnett are among the cast of The Children’s Monologues, directed by Danny Boyle.

Proceeds from the performance will go towards building a new arts centre in the Rammulotsi township.

The one-off show will be at the Royal Court in London on Sunday. 

It will also be performed simultaneously in South Africa by the children whose personal experiences are revealed on stage, in their native Sesotho language.

Other stars taking part in London include Chiwetel Ejiofor, Kit Harington, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, David Thewlis and Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje.

Humanising children

Playwrights from both South Africa and the UK - including David Hare and Laura Wade - have dramatised the true stories, which tackle issues such as HIV, gang rape, murder, the loss of a parent and xenophobia.

Amber Sainsbury, founder of the charity Dramatic Need, which has organised the monologues, began the project in 2010 as a way of giving a voice to children who may not otherwise be heard.

“One of the biggest battles we have is trying to get people to understand why in a continent with great needs you need the arts,” she says.

“Surely food, water and medicine is more important, and in some parts it is - but in recovery and reconciliation, anything that humanises, particularly children, is actually in some cases as important.

"It’s about testimony, standing witness to your stories and asking children to talk about what’s happened to them in a way that’s non-invasive.

"It’s difficult for a nine-year-old child to say ‘I was raped and I am HIV-positive’ in front of her community, but it is easier for her to get up and say 'my name is such and such a character and this is what happened to me’.

"The community is then forced to recognise what happened, but they can’t direct anger or stigma at the particular child and that’s why theatre is a powerful tool in these communities.”However Sainsbury stresses the monologues are not all “doom and gloom”.

“There’s some very traumatic disturbing stuff that you never want a child to experience, but there’s also some upbeat moments as well of childish joy and playfulness.”

It is the second Children’s Monologues production, the first was held in 2010 and was also directed by Boyle. That show featured the likes of Cumberbatch, Tom Hiddleston, Gemma Arterton and Eddie Redmayne.

This time around, 17 actors, 13 writers, 17 artists, 10 musicians and three directors will come together for the first time on the morning of 25 October and have eight hours to rehearse before putting the show on.

“It’s a logistical nightmare and a huge challenge, but there is a real immediacy to it and it’s raw theatre,” Sainsbury says.

“It’s very hands on deck and I think that appeals to the actors to return to what attracted them to the vocation in the first place.”

'I felt devastated’

Josh Hartnett has been involved with Dramatic Need for a number of years, but is the first time he has been available in London to take part in the monologue project.

“I’m sure Danny [Boyle] has an interesting approach to bring these monologues to life - it won’t be as simple as getting on stage,” he says.

“I’m reading a monologue of a little girl reading from her diary and telling her story about her mother, the relationship they had and the lessons her mother taught her. But you find out at the end her mother died of Aids, so she’s writing in memoriam.

"At the beginning it seems like you’re just hearing a little girl’s adulation for her mother, but as it starts to come to light her mother is not there any more it takes a greater weight and by the end I felt devastated for her.

"I don’t have the greatest relationship with my own mother, so it took me for a loop as it gave me a longing for that connection and made me evaluate that relationship.”

Although The Children’s Monologues is only on for one night, Sainsbury says the legacy of the project will continue.

“The actors are so busy we could never get them to donate a week of their time, but the plan is to take the scripts and roll them out across schools and libraries across the country so they can be used as a learning tool,” she says.

“But the ultimate goal is making children empowered by the fact their stories matter and have value.

"It’s important that we remain empathetic and don’t forget that most children don’t experience childhood in the way we would want them to - and I hope that resonates with the audience.”

The Children’s Monologues runs at the Royal Court on 25 October.

20.10.2015 BBC News (x)