the most important scene

7

“It’s my favorite scene in the movie and it’s the most important scene in the movie. It’s also the scene that made the least sense to other people going in, which is why it’s a wonderful victory for me. I think that in superhero movies, they fight other people, they fight villains. So when I started to really hunker in on the significance of No Man’s Land, there were a couple people who were deeply confused, wondering, like, ‘Well, what is she going to do? How many bullets can she fight?’ And I kept saying, ‘It’s not about that. This is a different scene than that. This is a scene about her becoming Wonder Woman.’” -Patty Jenkins on the No Man’s Land scene

10

This scene will forever be the most important scene in any movie to me.  This is a little girl who has been told all her life by her parents that she is a mistake and that she is worthless.  This is a little girl whose family life is so horrible that books are her only escape.  This is a little girl whose parents constantly belittle her for reading, the only pleasure in life she has.  And in this scene, this little girl answers very shyly, because she has been conditioned to be embarrassed of her own existence.  At first, she answers slowly, and without making eye contact. And in this scene this little girl is beginning to realize that maybe she is special.  Maybe there are kind people in the world.  Maybe she is worth something.

A Most Important Scene From Voltron Season 3

So… there’s something about this entire scene that’s had me pondering it all morning. Now, despite my writing tendencies or even which characters I would like to see together, most people who know me understand that while I write and post certain things, how I actually view the canon is separate. Like, I don’t watch Voltron for shipping and what characters do and don’t end up together is not why I’m into it. I’m very realistic about potential ships and do my best not to let shipping goggles cloud my judgement. After all, I may like to create, but I also analyze. And anyone worth their socks in literary/media analysis knows that it’s about looking at what you’re given and not what you want to see (what we want to see gets into headcanon/prediction territory, which can be backed by analysis, but they aren’t the same thing). In other words, me fangirling about a ship and me looking critically at a piece of media are two very separate things. 

Therefore, this scene has left me in rather a… curious sort of hesitance? Because I find it hard to believe that I’m coming to the conclusions that I am? 

First and foremost, I’m glad that Lance and Keith are working together better and trusting one another enough to go to the other about their problems. I don’t care who you ship with who, it’s good character development for them when we look back at where they started and does nothing but help the team. Keith admitted his faults to Lance when he pushed the team too hard and Lance went to Keith when he was insecure. These are not small steps for these boys and I’m glad they’re finally becoming better friends. And that’s honestly all I thought I was going to take away from this season, if I even got that far. 

Until I saw this part of this scene specifically (I’ma use this screenshot a lot, lol) -

 - First of all, I want to look at how these frames with Keith are laid out. Keith is in the center of the frame the whole time, his posture is open, his expression is friendly, his smile is sincere. He is lacking in weapons or anything typically considered threatening. But what is probably most important is that we’re not just seeing Keith from Lance’s point of view, we’re seeing him through Lance’s eyes.  

There is a difference. For example, in these scenes - 

- we’re seeing Allura from Lance’s POV, but not through his own eyes. This is a very common type of shot when two people are having a conversation or even when multiple people are in the room. It’s like getting a third person description of what’s happening with weight on a certain character’s perspective. Sometimes it’s not even that far and it’s just convenient to look over this character’s shoulder. Versus when we get a more first person perspective when we see a character through another character’s eyes.  

We also get shots like this in this same scene - 

- This shot comes in concurrence with the one previously and can still be considered as coming from Lance’s perspective. So what’s the difference between this shot and the one of Keith? This shot is up close–it’s focused on Allura’s expression and what she’s saying. She’s also not completely centered, but balanced in the frame for the viewer, not Lance’s perspective. Lance is listening to her, not admiring her in any way, shape, or form. In fact, despite Lance’s general attempts at constantly flirting with Allura, he is not looking at her at all in this scene as a potential romantic interest. This entire scene is focused on what they’re saying and what that means. Not any kind of attraction between them. 

Which is what struck me as so odd about the way we see Keith through Lance’s eyes in episode 6. When a character is being admired by another character, getting a shot through their eyes of their subject from the waist up, or thighs up, or knees up, etc, is a very common way of displaying that admiration in a visual sense. It’s already clear from this scene that Lance views Keith as the new leader - 

- So even if Lance takes issue with some of the things Keith does, he–at the very least–begrudgingly accepts Keith’s position and is doing everything in his power to support him (as most of season 3 is evidence of). Which is why these frames - 

- took me so far aback. Honestly, I was much more expecting this kind of scene to be displayed from Lance’s eyes when his and Allura’s development took place. I even went back during their critical conversation to look for it. But there isn’t anything similar. Lance clearly respects Allura, but he didn’t “waver” in looking at her so as to imply a different kind of admiration. 

Another character that gets this treatment a lot? Shiro. Shiro is their leader. Shiro is their security. Shiro is oftentimes framed in this manner when the other paladins are listening to him. But usually it’s a group shot, and even if there are scenes with him and one other (maybe with Keith? I’m not going back to watch the whole series), his body language and expression are not so soft. There could probably be some shots of Shiro looking less severe when he speaks to Keith, but I never remember being this struck by a scene with Shiro that didn’t feel like anything more that admiration because he’s their leader and/or idol and/or older brother figure (this goes for Pidge as much as Keith). Just as I’ve never seen anything to blatantly support Klance before. Like, I’m not playing favorites here.  

The point I’m trying to make is that, in seeing Keith through Lance’s eyes in this scene, we’re gleaning a LOT about how Lance views Keith. Not only is he listening to Keith, but we’re seeing Keith as more than just a face with words. It would have been easy to frame this scene like this -  

- I mean, even this is still… But the point is, there were a lot of ways to frame this that didn’t have Lance giving Keith that “admiring” look that is oftentimes used in movies and animation. At this point, Keith is the center of Lance’s entire focus. The rest of the room is bare, Keith is what stands out most. But it’s not just his words or what he’s saying, it’s his entire person. It’s his body, his words, his posture, where he’s standing in the room. 

And then we get to his expression. This is so important. They could have given Keith more attitude, they could have had him lean back on one leg and cross his arms. They could have done LITERALLY ANYTHING ELSE to suggest that Lance was merely admiring Keith as a leader and friend, but they didn’t. They kept his posture open. They kept him still and centered in the frame. And they gave him the softest mother fucking smile that Keith has probably displayed in the entire goddamn show. And I don’t mean to say that he hasn’t given those small, soft smiles, because he has, but this one has teeth and is still soft. EVERYTHING about this frame is soft. 

And this is HOW LANCE is seeing Keith. We have the distance from where Lance is standing in the doorway to Keith to support this, as well as how he looks following, which implies that we were seeing Keith through him - 

- He’s looking over his shoulder, continuing the line of sight we the viewers were just privy to. And he reflects the same softness he has just seen in Keith. 

For fucks sake, all we need is an edit of that frame of Keith with a soft white background and some sparkles and we’re all fucking set! This frame - 

- was coded to be romantic. This is Lance not only admiring Keith, but seeing him in a “different” light. I mean, look at Keith’s hair for crying- UGH! Just add some wind and a few flower petals and- just- HOLY FUCK, LANCE! OGLE HIM SOME MORE WHY DON’T YOU! I don’t know if Keith is really this beautiful or not BUT YOU’RE DOING A GOOD JOB OF MAKING IT SEEM LIKE HE’S THE MOST BEAUTIFUL CREATURE YOU’VE EVER SEEN, LANCE!

Seriously, this is probably one of the most sincerely romantic frames we’ve gotten in the entire series. It’s also quite bittersweet. And, like, even if Lance isn’t aware that he’s looking at Keith like this, we are! We’re literally watching Lance form feelings for Keith through his own goddamn eyes. Ugh, gag me. 

I am disgusted. 

Originally posted by my-harry-potter-generation

Yes, I do teach creative writing: your opening scene

The opening scene is the most important piece of your novel. This scene determines whether your reader is pulled in or puts the book down. Here are some important do’s and don’ts.

DO write it as a scene, not a data dump. You may have a fantastic premise, a marvelous alternate history or post-apocalyptic world or magical realism to die for, but if you don’t engage your reader in an actual scene, you will bore them.

DO write a scene that immediately introduces a character that the reader can root for. Yes, I know Stephen King has had great success introducing victims that are then shortly afterward killed off. That’s a horror trope and we expect it. But if you are caught up in world-building and haven’t dreamed your way into a character who is worth following through 100,000 words of writing, your story is pointless. I have read many pieces of fiction by would-be writers who can’t grasp this essential concept, and without exception, they fail to engage the reader.

DO introduce the stakes right away. In case that’s a challenge that needs some exposition to develop, create some immediate stakes (a life threat works) that keep the tension high and the reader engaged until you can lay out the larger stakes.

DO begin in medias res, which means “in the middle of things.” Most beginning fiction writers make the mistake of starting too early in the plot. Meet the monster on page 1. 

DON’T include a flashback in the first chapter. Work on a scene, which means time is NOT compressed. It should include dialog, action, description, setting, and interior monolog. Keep everything happening within that scene for at least the first chapter. You can bring in a flashback in Chapter Three.

DON’T shift points of view within a single chapter. Let the reader establish a strong bond of interest (even if it’s with a POV villain) over the course of a whole chapter.

DON’T open the story with your character waking up unless it’s because she’s got a gun in her face (or a knife to her throat – you get what I mean). We don’t need to follow a character through their mundane daily routine. 

DON’T be coy. Beginning writers often have this idea that they need to hold back on revealing all their secrets – what’s in the box, who’s behind the curtain, where they’re going next, etc. Their well-meant plan is to slowly reveal all this over several chapters. Trust me on this one: tell your readers instead of keeping it a mystery. You WILL come up with more secrets to reveal. Your imagination is that good. Spill it now, and allow that revelation to add to the excitement.

8

It’s my favorite scene in the movie and it’s the most important scene in the movie. It’s also the scene that made the least sense to other people going in, which is why it’s a wonderful victory for me.

I think that in superhero movies, they fight other people, they fight villains. So when I started to really hunker in on the significance of No Man’s Land, there were a couple people who were deeply confused, wondering, like, ‘Well, what is she going to do? How many bullets can she fight?’ And I kept saying, ‘It’s not about that. This is a different scene than that. This is a scene about her becoming Wonder Woman.’ - Patty Jenkins on the No Man’s Land scene

8

Top 10 One Tree Hill relationships (as voted by my followers) #8 - Brooke and Nathan

“The thing is, the two of us have been down very similar roads. I mean, we were in the same cliques first. We both felt the same pressures, same expectations. Our parents were like children, and we both grew into kind of bad versions of ourselves way too fast. So I think you know I get it. They never really gave us a chance, did they - our parents? They didn’t know how. Look, the thing is, you made your dream happen, all right? And even though I didn’t quite get there, when it was taken away from me,I dealt with it alone. That was stupid, selfish and wrong. So if your mom tries to take your dream away from you and you feel that same pain I did I’ve sort of been there, okay? I’m gonna be kind of pissed off if you don’t come talk to me about it. Anyway, thank you for coming today. It means a lot. I know you didn’t know Quentin but it doesn’t surprise me that you’re thinking about other people when all this stuff is going on with you. That’s not bad for a girl who never had a chance.”

8

“ I have known what you truly are since the day we met. Long may you reign. “

Honestly one of the most important scenes in the entire Harry Potter series is when nine-year-old Severus Snape uses magic to cause a tree branch to fall on Petunia. Even at nine he had no qualms about hurting people Lily loved. This really serves to underscore the idea that while Snape loved Lily, he was not truly invested in her happiness or well-being because he did not care about the people she loved. At age nine he didn’t care about hurting her sister and at age twenty he didn’t care about the imminent deaths of her husband and infant son. So I will always stand by my opinion that while Snape no doubt loved Lily, it was not a healthy love and he really never deserved to have it reciprocated.

All About Writing Fight Scenes

@galaxies-are-my-ink asked,

“Do you have any advice on writing fight scenes? The type of scene I’m writing is mostly hand to hand combat between two experts. I’m definitely not an expert so when I try to write it, the scene ends up sounding repetitive and dull.”

Fore note: This post is coauthored by myself and one of my amazing critique partners, Barik S. Smith, who both writes fantastic fight scenes and teaches mixed martial arts, various artistic martial arts, and weapons classes.

I (Bryn) will tell you a secret: I trained MMA for seven years, and when I write authentic hand to hand fight scenes, they sound dull too. 

The problem with fight scenes in books is that trying to describe each punch and kick and movement (especially if it’s the only thing you’re describing) creates a fight that feels like it’s in slow motion. 

I write…

Lowering her center of gravity, she held her right hand tight to her face and threw a jab towards his chin. He shifted his weight, ducking under her punch. His hair brushed against her fist, and he stepped forward, launching a shovel hook into her exposed side.

But your brain can only read so fast. In real life that series of events would take an instant, but I needed a full eight seconds to read and comprehend it, which gave it an inherent lethargic feel. 

So, we have two primary problems:

  1. How do we describe this fight in a way the reader can understand and keep track of? 
  2. How do we maintain a fast paced, interesting fight once we’ve broken down the fight far enough for readers to understand it? 

(We will get back to these, I promise.) But for now, let’s look at…

Different types of “fight scenes:”

Keep reading

I'm terrified about trc tv show

So I thought I’d make a list of shit that I couldn’t cope with it not having:
-Blue and Ronan are played by Amandla Stenburg and Reece King
-Noah needs to be a faded glittery ghost child, he needs the glitter that’s the most important part
-the “murdered murdered remembered” scene
-everything needs to be aesthetic and pretty
-Cabeswater needs to look pretty not some ugly cgi shit
-the pig
-the iffy maybe slightly problematic stuff that ronan said would preferably be excluded
-the wardrobe needs to be good, the boat shoes cannot be excluded
-THE MURDER SQUASH SONG
-300 Fox Way has to be so busy and cosy and psychic-y
-I want Ronans love affair with his car to be captured in excruciating detail I fucking love Ronan and his car
-pynch
-it needs to be shown that Ronan is completely and utterly in love with Adam but shown in a soft light and pretty and also Fire and sex and just you know
-Ronan and Noah’s friendship
-When Gansey and Blue kiss but don’t kiss on the mountains I loved that scene so much
-“I’m always straight” “oh man that’s the biggest lie you’ve ever told”

Honestly the most underrated scene in ACOMAF is when they are in the court of nightmares and Feyre pretends to be Rhys’ plaything and she gets turned on, and instead of gloating or smirking about Rhys started telling her it was alright, that it was her body’s reaction. Like his Mate sat on his lap, turned on by his actions and instead of taking it in stride (like a certain High Lord might have done) he thought of her first, of how she might feel about it. In my opinion, that scene is one of the most important scenes for them in the entire book.