the most important characters

Sesshoumaru and Rin Official Info Translation Collection

@lettherebewisdomtalks​ sent me a collection of Japanese Twitter posts containing scans of official material talking about Sesshoumaru and Rin.  Since it is official material and some interview questions, I figured they were relevant to post here, and it’s easier than trying to post these long text pieces in a reply box.

[source] did not mention a source of this scan so it’s unknown who wrote this or where it came from.

Sesshoumaru is a man not concerned with ruminations of good and evil.  To achieve his goals, he has no qualms sacrificing others or resorting to murder.  And one other particular trait is his unusually elevated pride.  Thus he thoroughly despises plots involving manipulating others.  Conversely, he does not use others the way Naraku does.  He acts only for himself, and the grandeur in which Sesshoumaru refuses reliance on others could appropriately be referred to as “nobility”.
So for someone such as Sesshoumaru to carry the healing sword Tenseiga, it appeared a transformation was trying to assert itself.  When Sesshoumaru saved an unknown child, Rin, even his attendant, Jaken, was unable to hide his surprise at his unusual behavior.  The lonesome yet courageous Rin stimulated something in Sesshoumaru’s otherwise cool heart.

[source] does not provide a source, but it appears to be an interview answer from Narita Ken (Sesshoumaru’s voice actor)

– Do you think that Sesshoumaru saving Rin with Tenseiga was unusual behavior for him?
Narita: I think that he might have felt some sort of kindred spirit with Rin.  I feel like it was the first time he ever cared about anyone else.  I decided on my own that when he calls Rin’s name, to give it the feel of one calling on a disciple.

[source] says this is from an interview with Takahashi that appeared in the magazine “Stranger Sorento” in the 2015-04 issue.  “Stranger Sorento” ran a segment in every issue during that time called “Takahashi Rumiko Character box” that explored one of her characters each installment.  If anyone can find back copies of those magazines or other scans from these interviews, it would be greatly appreciated.

Takahashi: Sesshoumaru has a few of his own monologues, but Sesshoumaru’s follower Jaken ended up being a very important character for voicing most of his goals and motives.  Sesshoumaru’s actions are dictated by, quite simply, “I cannot abide by my esteemed daiyoukai father showing preferential treatment to my half-youkai younger brother (Inuyasha) rather than me, when I am a direct-line pure-blooded offspring.”  The readers understood that well enough, but in some circumstances I feel like they thought his situation was unfortunate.  So Sesshoumaru’s story in “Inuyasha” became one of “freeing himself from his father”.
– Thanks to meeting the human girl Rin, Sesshoumaru was able to learn the emotion of “Fear and sadness of losing someone precious to you: anger for someone’s sake other than your own” and finally matured into a powerful daiyoukai.
Takahashi:
When I initially introduced Rin, I was thinking that there would eventually be a part where Sesshoumaru was killed by a human in order to protect Rin, but as I continued writing I dropped that idea from my head.  I thought this would be an easily-understood impetus for Sesshoumaru’s limited emotions to start coming to the surface and mature the sword he inherited from his father.  I think it’s fun to have a character’s emotional state gradually change over the course of a long-running series.

[source] doesn’t cite a source in this tweet, but another page posted later that appears to be from the same place says it’s from the Wide-ban release of the manga.

Feelings awakened from the healing sword

When Sesshoumaru was healing from his injuries, he met a human girl called Rin.  Under normal circumstances Sesshoumaru would have paid her no mind.  However, due to his injuries he was unable to move, and as a result he ended up interacting with Rin.  Rin was attacked by wolves and killed.  Sesshoumaru initially thought to just leave her that way, but an image of her smiling face came to mind.  Sesshoumaru drew Tenseiga for the first time and restored Rin’s life.  Emotions that he had never felt before were beginning to stir in Sesshoumaru’s heart, which had never held a shred of interest in others, to say nothing of a powerless human girl.  Likely a large part of it was also simply a test of Tenseiga’s effect.  However, as the revived Rin travelled with him, Sesshoumaru’s actions with her gradually began to indicate that wasn’t the case.  Through his strength, Sesshoumaru’s neglected heart was gradually showing signs of growth.

[source] gives this as being from Wide-ban volume 28.

Emotions Sesshoumaru has never felt made to surface, his soul grows

Sesshoumaru steps into the Meidou in order to mature Tenseiga and grow Meidou Zangetsuha’s power.  He believes that by going there he can widen Meidou Zangetsuha’s circle, but he is forced to make an unexpected sacrifice.  The living are not supposed to set foot into the Meidou but he and Rin entered, and thanks to Sesshoumaru being a powerful youkai it had little effect on him, but Rin, being a mere human girl, lost her life.  Furthermore, even Tenseiga could not save Rin’s life.  For the first time in his life, Sesshoumaru felt incomparable grief and fear at losing something precious: the feeling of remorse.
Then, when faced with countless dead souls, he embraced a compassionate heart.  Holding Rin to his chest, when he purified the souls of the dead with Tenseiga, the Meidou created by Tenseiga widened.  Originally ruthlessly seeking only power, Sesshoumaru knew nothing of compassion.  But in the Meidou, Sesshoumaru learned both grief and compassion.  Tenseiga was able to mature by Sesshoumaru maturing himself and growing his soul.

[source] does not cite a source for these but they also appear to be from the Wide-ban, however they’re written as someone’s thoughts rather than a glossary summary.  It doesn’t say whose words these are.

The souls of the dead bound to that world were purified, so their dead souls could pass on… This was because Sesshoumaru, faced with Rin’s death, finally knew the grief and fear of losing something precious, and was able to wield Tenseiga’s true power.  Thanks to that, Tenseiga’s Meidou Zangetsuha grew and became closer to completion.
I think the story of Sesshoumaru’s journey and return from the Meidou was fairly important.  It was a story of Tenseiga, first of all.  By the end of it, Tenseiga had matured, meaning Sesshoumaru had matured as well… I feel like that means it was a significant story.

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i’ve been waiting to draw this for weeks now

The 9 Elements of a VILLAIN

If we’re being honest, one character is always the most fun to develop when you’re writing a new story. It must be the main character, right? The person you’re going to follow throughout the story, the one that means the most to you?

Nope. It’s the villain.

Villains are just FUN. You get to creep into the darkest corners of your writer brain and conjure up the most unashamedly detestable human being you possibly can. 

This is how we look when we begin creating a villain. 

But sometimes, it can be difficult to to make sure they’re fully believable humans. So here are the nine elements that have helped me out when developing these terrible people … 

1) Hero’s Shadow:

The relationship between the main character and the villain is the most important one in the story, because it is the source of all conflict. Without the villain causing trouble, the main character wouldn’t have the chance to be a hero. Without that trouble, the main character’s weaknesses wouldn’t be pressured, which means they couldn’t change. The villain is a condensed and magnified embodiment of the inner weakness that the hero is battling. They’re the SHADOW of hero, the example of what will happen if the main character goes down the wrong path. Both are facing the same problem in different ways. For example Darth Vader and Luke.  

2) Conflict Strategy:  

In the pursuit of stopping the hero from achieving their goal, the villain is going to attack them on 1) a personal relationship level 2) a societal level and 3) an inner level. They’re going to attack the people around them, they’re going to cause consequences for the community surrounding them, they’re going to get into their head and plague them. Because the hallmark of a villain is that they’re the person who’s perfectly suited to attack the hero’s greatest weakness. Villains should have a distinct set of tactics to destroy the main character, on at least two levels. 

3) Flaws: 

This one’s expected. Of course a villain has flaws, it’s in the job description. But flaws do not equate to ‘He kicks turtles every morning before breakfast’ or 'His favorite hobby is butterfly stomping’ or, more within the realm of possibility, “He wants to kill the hero”. These are evil actions, NOT flaws. A lot of villains, particularly in movies, will be given horrible things to do without any explanation for WHY they do them. And it’s pretty easy to give them reasons: just give them human weaknesses! That’s it. Whether the actions they take are as small as theft or as big as blowing up a planet, these actions stem from recognizable HUMAN FLAWS. So like a main character, a villain needs mental and moral flaws.  

Yup, even Maleficent has human flaws. And she’s a dragon part of the time. 

4) Counter Goal: 

All characters exist because they want something. And what do villains want? To get whatever the main character wants (for very different reasons), to stop them from reaching their goal, or another goal that directly conflicts with the hero’s goal. As long as that big tangible thing they want locks hero and villain in battle, you’re good. Think 101 Dalmatians: Cruella and the good guys are fighting over the puppies.  

5) Surface Motivations:  

Why is it that villains always have a team of followers? Because villains never outright state their true motivations. They always have a cover story, and that cover will paint them as righteous. Villains want to look like the good guy. So their real Hidden Motivations are defended by twisting perceptions of Good & Evil, by portraying evil acts in a positive light, by indulging their followers selfish emotions and desire to feel like “one of the good guys. " 

Take Gothel for example: she’s a loving mother who wants to protect her daughter from all the world’s darkness. (Sure you do, Flynn stabber.)  

Surface Motivations never stand up to logical scrutiny and a functioning moral compass, but giving your bad guy a compelling argument against your good side always makes things more interesting, which brings us to …

6) Counter Statement:

The main character needs to learn some kind of truth that will enable them to fix their lives, overcome their weaknesses, banish their ghosts. It’s whatever statement about "how to live a better life” you want to prove with your story. Your villain has other ideas. They don’t agree with that statement, have other beliefs about living life well, and represent an argument against it. For example, Voldemort: “there is no good and evil, there is only power, and those too weak to seek it." 

Although your argument isn’t very convincing, Voldy. I mean, you’re living in the back of some guy’s head.

7) Characterization: 

This is everything on the surface of the villain. The way they speak, the way they look, the way they act, their role in life, their status and power. This is the facade they project for the world to see, a calculated effort to control how they are perceived. This is closely connected to that surface want, because that surface is what they wish people to believe about them. Over time, the reader and the other characters are going to be able to see through this mask and see what it conceals. My favorite Disney example of this is Mother Gothel: on the surface she’s this bubbly mom who loves Rapunzel and wants to protect her from the harshness of the world. 

You can think of this as the text … 

8) Hidden Motivation: 

And this is the subtext. That surface motivation they want the world to believe is a mask concealing their true motivation, which is always rooted in their flaws,  selfishness, and skewed beliefs. 

9) Ghosts, Justification, Self-Obsession: 

These three are closely related, so they get counted together.
Like main characters, villains have GHOSTS: events from their backstories that knocked their worldviews out of alignment, that marked the beginning of their weaknesses, that haunt them still. Because these happened, the originally benign person allowed themselves to turn into someone who could occupy the job of "villain” in a story. Usually, these events are genuine misfortunes and are worthy of sympathy, just like the ghosts of a main character. Think of Voldemort growing up in an orphanage talking to snakes.

BUT! When it comes to ghosts, the major difference between a hero and a villain is HOW THEY DEAL with these unpleasant past events. Both have suffered, but react to suffering in very different ways. A villain will be consumed by these events, obsessed with the real (or imagined) persecution or disadvantage they’ve endured, convinced that all personal responsibility is nullified by their status of injured party. Past tragedies become a talisman that grants immunity from decency. 

This scene from A Series of Unfortunate Events sums it up.  An adult makes an excuse for a terrible person by saying he had a terrible childhood. And Klaus replies: 

Yes, maybe they’ve both lived through tragedy. But THE KIDS aren’t hurting others because of it. 

Because villains, who are constantly victimizing heroes, are completely convinced that THEY are the true victims here. No matter what they do, no matter what they are, they blame everything on that ghost, whether it was another person, society, or circumstances. And later they blame the hero, who they see as the REAL villain. For example, Frollo from The Hunchback of Notre Dame:  

“It’s not my fault, I’m not to blame”

So! WHY are villains like this?

SELF-OBSESSION! Yup, villains spend an unhealthy amount of time thinking about themselves and their plights and their plots. Think of any villain and it’s not hard to see the inherent narcissism behind everything they do. Like willingness to take action is the nonnegotiable trait of a main character, self-obsession is the trait that all villains seem to share. 

So! Developing villains in this way has worked out for me so far. If it looks like it might be helpful for you, give it a try.

And in the spirit of creating someone to torment our main characters and ruin their lives, here’s one more maniacal laugh for the road:

“My mission is to get them interested in Star Wars. My only chance is to get the big one hooked first because that’s how my kids work. I pitched Princess Leia as the most important character. I might have told a little lie and said that she was the princess of the entire galaxy. We had our first attempt the other day. I got whiplash checking to see if they were still awake, and I lost both of them before Princess Leia even showed up. I have faith in George Lucas though. We’re scheduling another screening with lots of candy. I think if we can just stay awake for the entire movie, we’ll be ready for The Empire Strikes Back.”

(Lima, Peru)

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Dream Les Mis cast

French man with a cap and French bread as Jean Valjean 

police officer running after a man in a chicken suit isolated on white as Javert 

Drawing Illustration of Old Priest as Bishop Myriel

Angry man shouting with French flag as Enjolras 

elegant-smart-man-smiling-rich-wearing-suit-holding-bottle-champagne as Montparnasse 

Quick zoom slipping on a banana as Bossuet 

ajcaimi  asked:

Hey Dana. I was wondering if you have any plans to develop and pitch a show of your own. If you do, what advice do you have for people who want to create their own show?

I did have plans to pitch a show. And I pitched it! And Disney bought it! And now I’m developing it!  It’s difficult and exciting ESPECIALLY because I’m doing all this for the first time. I hope I can show some images someday!

If I were to give one piece of advice to past me, it’d be to get comfortable writing entertaining scripts. As a showrunner the most important thing will be The Show, and 90% of The Show comes from The Writing. It’s difficult to find writers who will 100% understand your vision but if that’s an area you’re comfortable in you’ll never be an dire straits. I had never professionally written a script before my pilot. If I did maybe that part wouldn’t have been as stressful at the time haha. 

But let’s say you’re already good there. You’re good everywhere! 

How to pitch a thing! I used to love making “pitch books” as a kid, though I had no idea that’s what I was doing. It was just fun to develop worlds and characters! So even if you’re in HS or younger, making “pitch books” is a great way to spend your time and practice for the future. So get to it! Here’s just one format you can try: 

1. Cover page with short description of show and a fun image of your main character!

2. ½-1 full page describing your main character/s! (Don’t start with exhaustive explanations about the world, or any legends, or w/e, we’re here bc we want to connect with a character).

3. A couple pages with any other important characters you may have!

4. A page describing the most important relationships between your main character/s and others!

5. Simple 1 page description on how your world works! If it’s too complicated to get on one page, SIMPLIFY! Even the most complicated ideas can be pitched in 1-2 sentences. 

6. Important places! The main characters house? The bad guy’s castle? Stuff like that. 

7. Give em a couple episode examples! That’s where your show comes together, after all. 

And you’re done!

Fill your pitch book with fun images that show off your characters and your world! You don’t have to follow this format exactly, it’s your show, your pitch, do whatever you think will show off your ideas best. If you’re making an epic you might want to dedicate a page to where you want the show to go, and how the characters will evolve. Everything depends on what you want to make. But above all: Make it interesting to read!!! Make it fun to look at!!! Boredom is your enemy, fight against it!!!!

Are my exclamation points making this easier to understand? GREAT!!!!!

Now get out there and pitch some things cause I want new shows to watch.

i wish the naruto anime ended with a team 7 moment instead of a marraige :// this story wasn’t about naruhina, it was abt naruto and his journey with bonds, goals and never giving up. i really wish it ended with naruto’s most important people – the actual main characters – the people he’s valued and cherished since he was 12. rly disappointed in sp again. tbh the anime should’ve ended at ch. 699, a team 7 moment instead of of a marraige, or chp. 698

my literal favorite character trait abt lance is how emotionally intelligent and perceptive he is? like,, its something that i don’t often see explored in fics and whatnot, but its one of the most important aspects of his character that allows him to be so quick on his feet when the moment calls for it. like:

  • despite having not spent much time with her in the beginning, he was able to deduce that pidge harbored some strong feelings about the garrison’s talk of the kerberos mission, and made the decision to take the brunt of iverson’s anger for her when she confronted him
  • when he was overcome with homesickness, he left the party so as not to bring down the mood, and was able to deduce within seconds that the rover copy was fake because it wasn’t with pidge
  • he was able to make quick judgements about the honesty of the mermaid queen when it was revealed that she and her people were being controlled the whole time
  • he knows how wary allura is of the galra & that it took a lot for her to trust shiro and go to the blade of marmora, and when the red lion started attacking the base, he expressed concern for her 
  • you could even argue that, even though it was under the guise of flirting, lance stayed with allura on the ship in episode 3 because he was well aware of her lack of trust in ulaz

basically, lance’s emotional understanding of both himself and others is a really important and beautiful aspect of his character, and i wish more people explored this trait in fanon.

9

Companion Moodboard Donna Noble.

“I just want you to know, there are worlds out there, safe in the sky because of her. That there are people living in the light, and singing songs of Donna Noble. A thousand, million light years away. They will never forget her, while she can never remember. … But for one moment… one shining moment… she was the most important woman in the whole wide universe.”

THE PRETTY LITTLE LIARS ENDGAME

It is bittersweet that I present to you my last ever theory for Pretty Little Liars. I apologise in advance for the insane length, but this is covering all those frustrating loose ends across the entire series. I hope you can make it to the end so we can discuss. My only fear for this theory is that it is too daring and gutsy; it would re-define the show we thought we knew. Are the writers willing to ‘go there’ in just 10 episodes? I don’t know! Regardless if this is all right, partially right, or so damn wrong, I hope you have as much fun reading this as I did putting this together the past two months! For the last time before the show ends… I hope you enjoy!

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