the most iconic dance scene ever

im so proud this is an emotional moment for me i remember being super excited that got7 was announcing a comeback and seeing all the teasers and spoilers for just right and how we recognized the girl from one of jinyoung’s films and how that was the moment when bambam hit puberty like a bus and mark’s unforgettable hoodies for the m/v and also jaebum’s hairstyle for that era (bless his forehead) and let’s not forget everyone freaking out about the scene where jackson was licking his fingers and when their m/v got featured on the fine bros yt channel for ppl to react to and also when yugbam were obsessed with the whip/naenae and not to mention real got7 season 3 with the pool/summer vibes and i remember them being so thankful that their video hit 3, 4, and 5 million views and that was also the time when they made the most iconic dance practice video ever and.

im just so happy. the boys never asked to get 100 million views on their m/v and yet they did, which is probably bringing big smiles to their beautiful faces. just right era was literally just right and it was also the moment i knew got7 was the one group for me. im so proud of them and the recognition that they are getting bc it’s beyond deserved. got7 and ahgases are honestly the best. let’s continue to support and love our boys for all their hard work ♡

Every Important [BANGTAN BOMB] You Need to Watch

[No, this is not all of them. Let’s be real a bunch of them are kinda boring. So here ya go all the good ones lol. (this list does not include Episodes only Bombs)]

** = Personal Favorites

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

5

Alright, kids, let me tell you about one of my favorite movies, SUMMER STOCK!

For those who haven’t seen it, or even those who have, it’s a fucking weird plot.  Judy Garland runs a farm (I mean, sure, did you see the overalls?) and her overly-dramatic sister, Abigail (played by the thoroughly lovely Gloria De Haven), brings an entire musical theater troupe (headed by the perfect talent and sex machine that is Gene Kelly and his goofy buddy Phil Silvers) to the family farm to use the barn for rehearsals.  Joe (Gene Kelly) is engaged to Abigail, and Jane (Judy Garland) makes everyone help out on the farm, which, as actors and dancers, they are horrible at in the most comedic fashion.  Eventually Abigail leaves the show with the show’s star, and Jane takes her place.  Obviously Joe and Jane fall in love because after a straight-up tap dance battle in the barn, how could you not fall in love?  The most well-known thing about the movie is probably the “Get Happy” scene where Judy Garland sings one of her best-known songs in a hat and jacket with men falling at her feet (see picture bottom right).

Beyond the music and cast and cute (stupid) story, I love this movie because of the backstage stories.  Facts about production include:

  • No one wanted to hire Judy Garland because she was fat and a complete drug addict (story of Judy’s fucking life). Gene Kelly was hired first, because Gene Kelly is a fucking genius of song and (mostly) dance and has charisma like no one else.  He and Judy had already done two movies together (For Me and My Gal, which was Gene’s first film and I’m pretty sure his only B&W movie, and The Pirate, which is a triumph of nonsense which is only worth seeing a scene where Gene Kelly dances all sweaty in REALLY short shorts.  God bless.), so Gene knew Judy’s talent and loved her and they were friends.  He put up his OWN MONEY and made sure the producer and director knew Judy and loved her like he did.  Gene wanted Judy for the movie and wanted to make sure she would be comfortable and supported.
  • As I said, Judy was fat in most of this movie.  “Hollywood fat” which in the 1950s and on her five-foot-tall frame with her round face just makes her look kinda pudgy and cute.  Why was she “fat”?  Because she was trying to get sober.  She’d been on uppers her whole life to keep her dancing and singing for literally 12-20 hours a day.  So she was trying to wean off the pills, and it ruined her metabolism and she got “fat.”
  • Despite being “fat” she dances like no one’s fucking business.  Gene Kelly is arguably the greatest dancer on screen of all time.  And in the dance battle scene in the barn (photo below left of the movie poster), she matches him step for step PERFECTLY.  Like they are 100% equally matched.  Except for probably Cyd Charisse, or maybe Ann Miller, I’ve never seen anyone dance with Gene Kelly as masterfully as Judy Garland does.  And she does it about 3 dress sizes above her normal working-weight.  Size obviously has zero to do with talent or ability, but for someone who is definitely not used to dancing at that weight, she does it better than I’ve ever seen her in any film.
  • THE NEWSPAPER DANCE.  Gene Kelly, as is a staple of his movies, does a solo dance number.  This one (pictured bottom left), is done with a sheet of newspaper, a squeaky board, and two stairs on a stage.  And it’s brilliant and perfect and so creative.  The athleticism of it is astounding (and a huge turn-on).
  • There is one scene in the movie where Judy magically loses like half her body mass (only to regain it one scene later), and that is the Get Happy number.  After the first screening of the film, everyone decided Judy needed a big solo.  She has a few songs in the movie, but nothing that really pops.  So they gave her Get Happy and choreographed and filmed the number a few months after the film wrapped.  It was inserted near the end, and other than the fact that Judy lost all the weight in the interim, you’d never know it wasn’t originally intended to be in the film.  It was rumored that this scene was actually filmed for another film years before, but that isn’t actually the case.  It was intended for Summer Stock, it was just an afterthought.  And it’s the best afterthought ever, and one of Judy Garland’s most iconic music numbers from her adult career.

In conclusion, this movie is great and the best part about it is the fact that everyone involved literally made it to save Judy Garland’s career because they loved her and believed in her talent.

2

Reese Witherspoon Celebrates the 15th Anniversary of ‘Legally Blonde’

To see more from Reese, check out @reesewitherspoon on Instagram.

Fifteen years ago today, the world met Elle Woods: faithful sorority sister, mother to Chihuahua Bruiser and star student at Harvard Law School. More than a decade later, the legacy of Legally Blonde and its pink-clad character is as strong as ever, having spawned a sequel, a hit musical and its own vocabulary (when in doubt, just “bend and snap”). To celebrate the movie’s 15th anniversary, Instagram spoke with actress Reese Witherspoon (@reesewitherspoon) about her memories on set and what playing Elle Woods meant to her.

It’s been 15 years since Legally Blonde came out. What do you remember most about making the film? When we filmed it, my daughter was a year old. I remember her visiting the set and how much she loved all of the costumes and all the pink clothes and the dog. It was a really fun cast and everybody was excited about creating something that wasn’t just confection. It actually had a meaningful story that we had no idea would resonate so strongly with so many people. And it was about female empowerment. It wasn’t necessarily about the girl getting the guy.

You’ve said in the past that you got to keep all the outfits. Did you end up wearing any of them again?[Laughs] No they’re all very finely preserved between tissue paper and in a special storage unit. I keep a close eye on them. I have a couple of costumes that I feel really special about throughout my career, and those are definitely some of them.

One of the film’s most iconic moments is the “bend and snap” scene. Do you have any memories about shooting it? It was actually a full-length musical number and it ended up getting shortened. That’s why when you see it in the movie, everybody is dancing. But it was a fully choreographed number by Toni Basil, and she was awesome. She did the whole dance. I remember just reading it and thinking it was the most hysterical thing ever. That is still the most asked request I get from people. Even this past year, when I have been giving speeches or talking about whatever, they always ask me, “Will you do the bend and snap?” I have a feeling I will be doing the bend and snap until I am 95.

Have you rewatched Legally Blonde recently? No, but a girlfriend of mine sent a video to me recently of her kid watching it for the first time. And her son, who is 7, said, “I liked that Elle was the woman that she wanted to become and she didn’t need a man to do it.” It was so cute that a 7-year-old boy said that. I’ve also had people send me essays their daughters have written to get into school or camp where they’ve said Elle Woods was their hero. And I have had so many women say to me, “I went to law school because of Legally Blonde.”

I think it was a pivotal moment in feminism only because it was like, Oh wait, you don’t have to be learned and boring. You can embrace your femininity, you can love to get your hair and nails done, you can love fashion, but also be incredibly intelligent. And I don’t know why those were two separate ideas at the time. Now it seems crazy to think that people thought that. It was kind of a lightning rod moment. Which was crazy that was 2001!

You addressed this a little already, but what does the Elle Woods character mean to you personally, 15 years later? Well it’s a big piece of my life, a big piece of my career. I owe so much to the creation of that character. She’s a big part of who I am as a person. I put a lot of myself into that — a positive person who is trying not to let other attitudes bring her down. I am really proud of what we created. And it was an incredible effort. It was just a really special moment that I will never forget. It makes me so proud that people watch it and it’s still relevant and it reaches so many people all over the world. It’s very rare you create a character that people know that well.