the most famous train in the world

jingjing_vicky:

Just interviewed #tomhiddleston, one of my favorite actors. And his answer perfectly explained how him and many other British actors & actresses are successful around the world. He said: “There’s a philosophy of artistry in British training, which is ‘we are trained to be artists, we are not trained to be famous.’ The thing that matters the most of all is our work. As an actor, you commit your whole self to doing that work, to be intellectually curious, to be physically agile and to be emotionally compassionate. The head, heart and body all working at once.
Because in British theater tradition, there’s no hiding place, there’s no short cut, no fast track…There’s no digital magic can make you better. The only thing that makes you a good actor is the sharpness of your mind, the size of your heart and the commitment of you body, all working at once.” #kongskullisland #britishboy

Day 19: War

Loose the dogs of War today since we’re talking about… War! In particular today is about how large-scale disputes are resolved. This could mean that your world may favor information wars, proxy wars, cold wars, internal conflicts, etc. with of course the most famous type of war being the trading of lives on a battlefield.

Despite what a certain protagonist of one of the Fallout series games says, War changes. Numbers of participants changes, technology changes, context changes, tactics change. The invention of crossbows and guns meant long-range warfare was no longer limited to specially trained individuals dedicated to the art of archery. Any soldier could be handed the device and trained up in a comparative blink of an eye, allowing them to fight at range. This meant a lot for future battles and for those who adopted this technology late, the consequences may have been devastating.

Culture also dictates the nature of war. Concepts of honor, humanitarianism, and tradition may change how someone treats their opponent on and off the battlefield. When prisoners are caught, how are they treated? When one side has clearly lost, is there an olive branch for peace extended along with conditions for this peace now that one side has their lives for leverage? Who even fights in these conflicts? Do nobility forge their leaders in battle or do they keep their hands clean of such affairs? Who are those in the front line and what is their motivation for being there?

This is a subject that is potentially troubling for some, but is a matter of deep interest for others. Some maybe even imagine a world without war. If that’s the case then you can definitely speak about the measures taken to prevent this. There have been some interesting takes on how peace can be achieved.

Well good luck with your war of the worlds and…

GET BUILDING!

jingjing_vicky Just interviewed #tomhiddleston, one of my favorite actors. And his answer perfectly explained how him and many other British actors & actresses are successful around the world. He said: “There’s a philosophy of artistry in British training, which is ‘we are trained to be artists, we are not trained to be famous.’ The thing that matters the most of all is our work. As an actor, you commit your whole self to doing that work, to be intellectually curious, to be physically agile and to be emotionally compassionate. The head, heart and body all working at once.
Because in British theater tradition, there’s no hiding place, there’s no short cut, no fast track…There’s no digital magic can make you better. The only thing that makes you a good actor is the sharpness of your mind, the size of your heart and the commitment of you body, all working at once.” #kongskullisland #britishboy

https://www.instagram.com/p/BRvE8f7lDhW/
Things John Finnemore Has Ruined* Forever

the ending of Casablanca

cheese

hiring a man and van 

museums

maths

Monopoly

bears (all varieties)

quiche

the number 19

pineapple juice

Peach Schnapps

going through the airport metal detector

The Archers

takeaway pizza

getting some keys made

the Olympics

zoos

pampering

olives 

hats

ducks

geese

bacon

the World Cup (“The World what?” “The World Cup.” “The what Cup?”)

the Grand National

Goofy

poussin

cheesecake

strudel

sea lions

moths

hotel towels

Top Gun

lemons

ice cream vans 

ice cream chimes

train announcements

stamps

Leon Trotsky

Thomas The Tank Engine

Doctor Who

Belgium

Winston Churchill’s most famous speech

ordering coffee in coffee shops

horseboxes

The Famous Five books

the area of South London known as Elephant & Castle

the songs “Greensleeves”, “Deck The Halls”, “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen”, “Fly Me To The Moon”, and “Come Fly With Me” (and many more)

aviator sunglasses

otters

dragon fwoo

sheep

Nottingham

Bristol

bees

King Arthur

the words awesome and awful

Timbuktu (Timbuktu)

Jelly Babies

Russselll Crooooowe

Any words beginning with Q

putting on a seatbelt

dressing gowns

Duxford Air Museum

the phrase not a happy bunny

any dish containing rice as the main ingredient

fire extinguishers

apples

Minstrels

anything with tentacles

trapdoors

insomnia

Toblerones

Christmas stockings

the NATO Phonetic Alphabet (“Mick! Mi! Muh!”)

using a stepladder (“or, as we call it, the Widow Maker”)

Pony Club girls

getting out of sync

trophies

medals

French accents

Australian accents

Irish accents

tortoises

the word bravery

Jekyll & Hyde

baked potatoes

dinosaurs

Christmas gift supplements

choosing a restaurant

falconry

penguins

vultures

putting on a seatbelt

wiiiiinnnndddddd-drrrrriiiiieeeeeedddd ssssaaaauuuuussssaaaggeeeee

booking a holiday

the Grand Canal in Venice

kiosks

bananas

altitudes

altimeters

the word basking

buying a watch

yellow cars

interviews

the Seven Deadly Sins

the Seven Dwarves

the Six Nations

bread

coffee

reading the Sunday papers

Reykjavik

Helsinki

cakes

flying

the word brilliant

———————

… and…

snow leopards

Winnie the Pooh

carp

jacket pockets

* changed, and infinitely improved

I believe that the Russian ballet school is one of the few (if not the only) school that keeps the traditions of the classical ballet art. It is the authentic source of classical ballet, I’d dare say. No ballet dancer trained outside of Russia can experience the same atmosphere and the spirit of the ballet art as Russian ballet dancers do. That is why the Russian ballet dancers are the most famous, and the best, in the world.
—  Nikolay Tsiskaridze

The long train

Once upon a time, there were two railway companies who kept battling for the record of longest train in the world. Spanning the most kilometres would make them famous, and everyone would want to ride their train, thus earning them back all the money they’d invested in their competition.
So it came to be that one of them built a train that stretched over half of the planet’s circumference. They also built a track around the whole world, running over the sea on enormous bridges, as none of the previously existing railroads was long enough for the train.
After that, their rivals conceded they had lost.

It was an odd feeling when you entered the last compartment and knew that the first was hanging upside down far below your feet. The children would run from one carriage to the next, trying to reach their destination faster. Of course the train only ran in one direction, so they’d have to find other, less impressive ways to return home.
However, none of those means of transportation are visible from space, while these days, in the 25th century, you can still see a metal snake circling around the Earth. The travelling ring makes it at least as intriguing as Saturn, and that is what attracted our visitors.

At her wedding to Prince Charles, The Prince of Wales on 29 July 1981at St. Paul Cathedral, Lady Diana Spencer wore an ivory silk taffeta and antique lace gown, with a 25-foot (7.62 m) train, valued then at £9000. The dress was designed by David and Elizabeth Emmanuel , who described it as a dress that  "had to be something that was going to go down in history, but also something that Diana loved", and which would be “suitably dramatic in order to make an impression”. It became one of the most famous dresses in the world, and was considered one of the most closely guarded secrets in fashion history.

We like to build these little worlds where everything gets sorted out and makes sense and, if possible, the good guys win. No one would call Agatha Christie a fantasy writer, but look at the books she’s most typically associated with - they’re about tiny isolated little worlds, usually a country house, or an island, or a train, where a very careful plot is worked out. no mad axeman for Agatha, no unsolved crimes. Hercule Poirot always finds the clues.
And look at Westerns. The famous Code of the West largely consisted of finding somewhere where you could safely shoot the other guy in the back, but we don’t really want to know that. We’d rather believe in Clint Eastwood.
I would, anyway. Almost all writers are fantasy writers, but some of us are more honest about it than others.
And everyone reads fantasy … one way… or another.
—  Terry Pratchett Whose fantasy are you? Book (W. H. Smith), 17 September 1991 in A Slip of the Keyboard pg.88