the merch factory

Jaa’m 2.0

“Pros and cons: I hate the number of mouths there are.”

After the lovely success of my first Jaa’m shirt, I present the second evolution of the Jaa’m lineage, based on Griffin & Justin McElroy’s Monster Factory series.

This adorable new pet is available on shirts, hoodies, phone cases, stickers, and more! Visit my Redbubble shop and get yours now!

<3

CLEARANCE SALE FOR NINTENDO 3DS GAMES

Hiii, I’m selling my games for $25 each!

  • Story of Seasons
  • Rune Factory 4
  • Persona Q ~Shadow of the Labyrinth~
  • Tomodachi Life
  • Animal Crossing: New Leaf

**THESE ARE ALL US VERSIONS**


PayPal only. Payments are in USD. Depending on where you are, starting price for shipping (with tracking) is $6!

Please PM or send an ask if you’re interested! Reblogs are appreciated. ^-^

The third wave of feminism, ushered in during the 90s by activists like Rebecca Walker, existed alongside the explosion of the internet, the creation of blogs, and the invention of digital social media.

The digitization of information largely means the democratization of info in Western countries, where citizens have access to the internet via public and private institutions, but it also means corporations and institutions can exploit these ideas for money, seeing as these ideas (due to social media and the internet) now have larger followings. Lots of ideologies have been watered down and exploited for profit in the last decade.

Feminism’s been exploited by capitalist industries, no doubt.

Young teens, third (some argue fourth, who knows anymore? boundaries between the two and between generation z and millennials are murky and constantly fought over) wave feminists, can now explore sexism and misogyny via their Twitter timeline or a graphic posted to Tumblr. 

Corporations know this, and are desperate to lure in young audiences (in their minds, potential buyers and lifetime customers).

So how do they get us?

Feminist merch. Straight up, feminist merch. Shirts with pictures of Frida Kahlo. Jelly bracelets with the term “feminist” strung around it on heart-shaped beads. Cheaply made baseball-tees with the term “feminist” and a dictionary definition of the term beneath it in bold typeface.

Are these things cute? Sure, no lie.

Should we buy these? No, because feminism has been commodified. It’s no longer a politicized term, but a buzz word that translates directly into dollar signs.

The retailers and brands selling you feminist merch pay their factory workers terribly. They don’t provide maternal or paternal leave. The proceeds they make off feminism, off of the struggle of women, don’t go to non-profits or to breast cancer survivors or low-income families; it goes to the pockets of large corporations

Frida Kahlo would HATE that. Actually, I know she’d hate it. 

The corporations selling you feminist merch don’t care about feminism. They don’t believe in it. They’re using the word to make money. They’re appropriating a cause, one they have no intention of supporting.

True feminist merch is handcrafted by you, the consumer. It’s the bracelets you make with friends and the shirts you make with thrifted shirts and iron-on decals. True feminist merch is made by feminists. There’s often no profit involved, and if there is one, it’s donated or given meaning. 

True feminist merch is political. It reiterates feminism’s beliefs and values and disrupts capitalism, misogyny, ableism, clasissm and etc. 

Stop buying feminism and benefiting the same people who don’t care about you

.Make feminism. Spread feminism. 

Reclaim the term “feminism” one home-made tee at a time.

T-Shirts sold so far, week 1

Do you know what victim culture is?
No you don’t, you are assuming you do because you recognize both words, but when you try and explain it, at best you will give a B.S. essay answer and still not be right.  That’s why we need a documentary, duh.  

Do you care at all?
Yes you do.

If you actually do know what victim culture means these days, then you know how frustrating it is that nobody else around is aware of it.   That’s why we need a documentary, duh.

‘no means no’ T-Shirt sales were a little slow last week,
rounding up, we sold zero. 

T-Shirt poster = 540 notes

“Do you want a victim culture Documentary?”
Victim Culture Documentary Project Outline = 269 notes

Fanmail & Asks expressing excitement about the victim culture documentary
= lots!  

Too Expensive?After shipping there is about $4-$8 profit per shirt.  ( We are canadians and don’t have a merch. factory lol it costs a lot to get a Tshirt and it costs tons to ship it anywhere in the world.)  
With 2500 T-shirt sales cruelteafree will raise half the $25 000 we need to make this, we can match that among our artist collective to create a really good thing for everyone on the earth. It is not a cash grab in anyway shape or form. 

The last thing we want to do is push a project nobody wants, but people are screaming for this documentary.  So why isn’t anyone supporting the idea with the purchase of a very cool conversation starter, ‘no means no’ TSHIRT?

Two months to sell 2500 t-shirts or else this project goes on the shelf til next year, or never! :(  

Everyone LIKEs doing the right thing. Please REBLOG this, it needs to find the people who can support it.  It really is the least you can do, but we still <3 U :)