the marriage of reason and squalor

  • Justice Strauss : If anyone present knows any reason why Jerome Squalor and this woman should not be joined in marriage, speak now or forever hold your peace.
  • Jacques Snicket : Uh... yeah? Because... she's a bitch? With no conscience... no mercy... no soul?
  • Esme Squalor : Oh, Jacques. [fake chuckle] Ignore him. He drinks. [murderous stare] But the law requires a witness.
  • Jacques Snicket : ...and I've witnessed plenty.

Andrea Palladio, Villa Almerico Capra detta La Rotonda, Vicenza, 1566-1580
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Pedro Machuca, Palace of Charles V, Granada, Spain, 1526
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Jean-Nicolas-Louis Durand, “Prècis des leçons d'architecture", 1802-1805
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Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, Cimitière de Chaux, 1804
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Karl Friedrich Schinkel, Altes Museum, Berlin, Germany, 1823-1828
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Bramante, Tempietto di San Pietro in Montorio, Roma, 1502
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Erik Gunnar Asplund, Stockholms stadsbibliotek, Stockholm, Sweden, 1928
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Andrea Mantegna, House of Mantegna,  Mantova, Italy, 1476
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Oswald Mathias Unger, Hotel Berlin, 1977
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Erik Gunnar Asplund, Woodland Chapel (Skogskapellet), Skogskyrkogården, Stocholm, Sweden, 1918-1920
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Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, Panaretheon, 1804
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Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, Maison de gardes agricoles pour le parc de Mauperthuis, 1790
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Robert Adam, Syon House, London , England, 1762-1769
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Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, Barrière Saint-Martin, Paris, 1784-1788
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Claude-Nicolas Ledoux, Maison de campagne, 1773-1779
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Giovanni Battista Piranesi, Pianta di Ampio Magnfico Collegio, 1750
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Peter Zumthor, Gallery for the “360° I Ching” scultpure by Walter de Maria, Gallery Dia, Beacon NY, 2003
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Jean Nouvel, Monolith, Expo 02, Morat, Switzerland, 2002
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Andrea Palladio, I quattro libri dell'architettura, Libro Primo, cap. XVIII, scala a doppia elica del castello di Chambord, Francia
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Louis Kahn, Preliminary scheme of First Unitarian Church, Rochester, New York, USA, 1959
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Philip Johnson and John Burgee, General American Life Insurance Company, St. Louis, Missouri, USA, 1977
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Jože Plečnik, Slovenian Parliament Building, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 1947
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Pier Vittorio Aureli,  The Marriage of Reason and Squalor, 2014
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Baukuh; Public building, 2008
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Armando Brasini, Basilica del Sacro Cuore Immacolato di Maria, Roma, 1923-1951
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Charles Holden, Arnos Grove tube station, London, England, 1932
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George Bähr, Frauenkirche, Dresden, Germany, 1726-1743
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Emilio Ambasz, Houston Plaza Center, Houston, Texas, USA, 1982
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Paulo Mendes da Rocha e João De Gennaro, Gimnasio del Club Atlético Paulistano, São Paulo, Brazil, 1958
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Oscar Niemeyer, Standpipe for the Ribeirao das Lages, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1941 


Happy birthday to Frank Stella! Stella made this painting for MoMA’s exhibition Sixteen Americans in 1959, at which time the Museum purchased it. “Stella talked about wanting to create a picture that would have a strong and immediate visual impact “an imprint,” he called it,” says curator Leah Dickerman. 

[Installation view: Frank Stella. The Marriage of Reason and Squalor, II. 1959. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2015 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

4

I guess this isn’t technically me doing an Art Assignment– I didn’t create either of these art pieces myself– but watching Lauren Zoll’s assignment video “Off” made me think of my recent visit to the St. Louis Art Museum, and these two particular installations in their Contemporary Art section. It took me several minutes of staring at the first piece, Frank Stella’s “Marriage of Reason and Squalor”, to confirm that the subtly shifting color was not the paint itself, but the light of the second piece, Dan Flavin’s “untitled”, reflecting off it from an opposite corner of the room. And it was just so fascinating, the way these two separate works of art wind up interacting with each other (and with the viewer, as her moving position between the two changes the angles of the reflections), even though they were made by different artists who likely never anticipated them interacting in such a way, simply by proximity.