the mantilla

“Veiling is about humility, modesty, and reverence for the Lord. There are many reasons to do it. I’ve heard stories of Catholic women being treated differently by friends and family for being traditional and it’s really sad. One time at daily Mass this summer, I saw a little girl and her mother wearing mantillas. I thought it was beautiful. I thought, ‘That’ll be my daughter and me’. After Mass, I told her that I liked her veil and she just giggled and smiled. It was a nice moment.”

- Quote by me

“I usually go to Confession and Mass on Saturdays, back to back, but sometimes I go to Mass on Sundays and go to Confession while I’m out and about on a Saturday afternoon. Even if I’m only going to be at church for a few minutes, I bring my mantilla with me.”

- Quote by me

“As a Protestant convert, I can say that tradition really drew me to the Catholic Church.”

- Quote by me

[on Michigan Women’s Music Festival] The concern of transgender activists with their own ‘liberation’, Mantilla argues, came 'at the expense of women trying to for just one week in one remote corner of the United States to feel completely safe from male violence’. After male-bodied transgenders chose to enter the festival, Mantilla says that 'the feeling of complete safety from men and patriarchal rape culture’ was 'eroded’ because women attendees knew that 'a man’ could always be there. Mantilla comments that the determination of male-bodied transgenders to enter the space shows how deeply 'threatening’ women’s separatism is to men, and that more such spaces are needed, not fewer. The transgender challenge, she says, is a 'rebellion against women’s rebellion’ and works against 'the liberation of women from patriarchy’; it is straightforward anti-feminism by social conservatives.
In 2010 the tactics of transgender activists who entered the festival became particularly violent and aggressive. A member of the security crew, who says she did not question anyone’s 'gender’, described how Camp Trans set up Camp Tranarchy, and 'vandalized the festival and threatened festival goers’. A flyer being distributed by the activists showed a rather extraordinary degree of woman hating: 'A hot load from my monstrous tranny-cock embodies womanhood more than the pieces of menstrual art your transphobic c*nts could ever hope to create’. Women at the camp recorded a range of violent incidents they were subjected to. One said that her car was vandalised and a chemical sprayed on both door locks. There was gunfire one night from the Camp Trans area, waterlines were cut and tires slashed, shower plumbing was damaged and banners destroyed. Tents were painted with 'Fuck fest’ and “real women have cocks’. Women spoke of being traumatized, suffering post-traumatic stress disorder, and not feeling safe to attend the festival again.
—  Gender Hurts by Sheila Jeffreys