the low budget crew

Season 4 will be the last season of SKAM. (via Julie Andem on Instagram)

julieandem: I don’t remember who it was that asked me, but it was very early on, during a shoot for the first season. “How big do you think this show is going to be?”, one of the actors asked me, a little skeptically. We were standing in the schoolyard at Nissen High School, a small, low budget production crew, one photographer, the sound engineer and me. “Who knows, but I think we should aim for world domination”, I said. We all laughed, ‘cos I was obviously joking. None of us understood then how big Skam would turn out to be. This experience has been completely unreal, and a joy to be a part of. 

Skam has been a 24/7 job. It has also been amazingly fun to work on, and I really believe that has given the series a unique energy, and ensured that Skam continues to surprise and entertain. 

We recently decided that we won’t be making a new season this fall. I know many of you out there will be upset and disappointed to hear this, but I’m confident this is the right decision.
Please don’t be sad, dear SKAM fans, the coolest fan base on earth! I’m moved by you all each and every day. The way you keep up with and defend Skam. The way you look for clues, interpret and analyze everything you see. If you only knew how I contort my brain to keep you on your toes. I’m touched by all that you share, and the way you look out for each other. 

Many people have asked me what aspect of working on Skam has left the strongest impression on me. you left the strongest impression. The comments under ”Vært litt spess i det siste” still make me *cries in Norwegian* 

A heartfelt thank you to all of you. I’m going to miss you when SKAM is over.
But first.
Are you ready for Sana?
Cuz shits bout to go down yo 

julieandem: I don’t remember who it was that asked me, but it was very early on, during a shoot for the first season. “How big do you think this show is going to be?”, one of the actors asked me, a little skeptically. We were standing in the schoolyard at Nissen High School, a small, low budget production crew, one photographer, the sound engineer and me. “Who knows, but I think we should aim for world domination”, I said. We all laughed, ‘cos I was obviously joking. None of us understood then how big Skam would turn out to be. This experience has been completely unreal, and a joy to be a part of.
Skam has been a 24/7 job. It has also been amazingly fun to work on, and I really believe that has given the series a unique energy, and ensured that Skam continues to surprise and entertain.
We recently decided that we won’t be making a new season this fall. I know many of you out there will be upset and disappointed to hear this, but I’m confident this is the right decision.
Please don’t be sad, dear SKAM fans, the coolest fan base on earth! I’m moved by you all each and every day. The way you keep up with and defend Skam. The way you look for clues, interpret and analyze everything you see. If you only knew how I contort my brain to keep you on your toes. I’m touched by all that you share, and the way you look out for each other.
Many people have asked me what aspect of working on Skam has left the strongest impression on me. you left the strongest impression. The comments under ”Vært litt spess i det siste” still make me *cries in Norwegian*
A heartfelt thank you to all of you. I’m going to miss you when SKAM is over.
But first.
Are you ready for Sana?
Cuz shits bout to go down yo

Why the second movie is the biggest hurdle to becoming a filmmaker — especially for women and minorities

First films are often made in a democratic fashion — on low-cost cameras, with crowd-funded budgets and crews made up of college friends. But second movies typically rely more on the machinery of Hollywood, a machinery that has often excluded women and minorities. That exclusion has received new attention lately thanks to both the diversity controversy around this year’s Oscars nominees and a government investigation into gender bias in hiring.

“There’s this myth of getting your film into Sundance and being instantly successful,” said Sundance Institute Executive Director Keri Putnam. “It’s worth busting that myth. For first-time filmmakers, getting in is just the beginning.”

Some independent filmmakers end up waiting an awfully long time for their follow-ups, despite auspicious debuts: “Boys Don’t Cry” director Kimberly Peirce took nine years to make her second feature, “Stop-Loss”; black British director Amma Asante took nine years to follow up her first film, “A Way of Life,” with “Belle”; and African American director Gina Prince-Bythewood had eight years between “Love & Basketball” and her second film, “The Secret Life of Bees.”

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