the loch lake

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Scotland - Sligichan Bridge/Skye, Eilean Donan Castle, Isle of Skye/The Quiraing, Perthshire, Glen Nevis, Urquhart Castle, Glen Coe, Mealt Falls/Skye, Loch Torridon. Eilean Donan Castle

-for more  of my UK shots and more travel:travel britain european travel world travel UK travelLondon travel

Drawcember Cryptid
15 - Loch Ness Monster

“Each boat has a wish for one of my brothers and sisters,” she told her friend.
“They are so tiny to have wishes inside,” her friend said quietly, trying not to make too many waves.
“The stars are tiny too but they make wishes come true.”
Her friend nodded in agreement. That seemed to make a lot of sense.

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Great Britain: Landscapes - Kynance Cove/Cornwall,  Sligachan Bridge/Skye ,Beachy Head, The Quiraing/Isle Of Skye, Pistyll Rhaedr, Loch Torridon, London/Hampstead Heath, Orton/Lake District, Loch Torridon, Llanberis Pass/Snowdonia

-for more  of my UK shots and more travel:travel britain european travel world travel UK travel London travel

flickr

Good Morning from Scotland

Loch Achilty Sunrise by Iain MacDiarmid
Via Flickr:
Colour in a small part of the sky and a near perfect reflection just about made up for the lack of foreground and skyline interest and the photo-bombing ducks that kept causing ripples!

flickr

Scotland The Brave by Stefan
Via Flickr:

Bessie (Lake Erie Cow Monster or Lorain Ocean’s Lake Monster)

Described as looking like a cow and having multiple heads in some sightings (yes you read that correctly). Sightings around Lake Erie started in 1907 and have continued ever since with sometimes basic or stranger description of the creature. One of the weirder descriptions was made by two brothers in 1937 as a creature made up of a hundred cows combined into one with arms.

flickr

Kilchurn Castle by Olivia Notter
Via Flickr:
Loch Awe, Argyll & Bute, Scotland | November, 2015

The Tooth of Nessie

Two American students once claimed to find the tooth of the Loch Ness Monster during their vacation to Scotland. They found it in a dead deer laying by the shore of the loch. Shortly after taking pictures of it a park ranger passed by and confiscated it. They posted the pictures online later to publicize their claim. The “tooth” was identified by keen eyed viewers as an antler from a roe muntjac deer. It’s said that the story was all a hoax and was actually a publicity stunt to help promote an upcoming book about the Loch Ness Monster.

flickr

Boulder cracking wilderness by Iain Harris
Via Flickr:
Looking down Loch Coruisk towards Sgurr na Stri, over glacier-sculpted bedrock and deposited rocks.