the lighthouse of alexandria

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Assassin’s Creed Origins + Scenery

The Signs as the Seven Wonders of the World

Colossus of Rhodes: Leo, Scorpio

Great Pyramid of Giza: Pisces, Virgo

Hanging Gardens of Babylon: Taurus, Cancer

Lighthouse of Alexandria: Gemini, Aries

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus: Aquarius, Libra

Statue of Zeus at Olympia: Capricorn

The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus: Sagittarius

The Lighthouse of Alexandria, sometimes called the Pharos of Alexandria, was built by the Ptolemaic Kingdom between 280 and 247 BC. One of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, for many centuries it was one of the tallest man-made structures in the world at about 120-137 meters. Badly damaged by 3 earthquakes between AD 956 and 1323, it became an abandoned ruin. It was the 3rd-longest surviving ancient wonder (after the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus and the Great Pyramid of Giza) until 1480, when the last of its remnant stones were used to build the Citadel of Qaitbay on site. In 1994, French archaeologists discovered remains of the lighthouse on the floor of Alexandria’s Eastern Harbor. The Ministry of State of Antiquities in Egypt planned in 2015 to turn submerged ruins into an underwater museum.

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The seven wonders of the ancient world by Te Hu
Hanging gardens of Babylon (Iraq)

Great pyramid of Giza (Egypt)
The lighthouse of Alexandria (Egypt)

Colossus of Rhodes (Greece)
Statue of Zeus at Olympia (Greece)

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus (Turkey)
Mausoleum at Halicarnassus (Turkey)

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These People Were Working So Hard To Create Something. And When You See It From Above It’s Just Incredible.

All of our most impressive achievements in human history - the pyramids of Giza, the lighthouse of Alexandria, and the hanging gardens of Babylon - are the result of tireless effort and collaboration.

This gorgeous, monumental effort was no different.

It took 60 volunteers from around the world along with 500 residents to create.

They painstakingly etched the bodies of 9,000 fallen soldiers from D-Day into the sand.

The effort was led by the artists Jamie Wardley and Andy Moss to commemorate those who sacrificed dearly on June 6, 1944.

The work is titled The Fallen 9000.

Everyone threw themselves into the effort, even though they knew with the tide it couldn’t last forever.

Here those who served in the D-Day landings will be remembered.

It includes all those civilians, Germans, and allied forces who died during the D-Day beach landings.

The original team was just a few volunteers.

But as word spread of what they were trying to accomplish nearly 500 residents pitched in too, and built this beautiful memorial together.

D-Day was one of the most significant days in our world and forever changed the course of history. These men were all a part of it, and this memorial stands as a stark reminder of how costly war can be. Share this important memory with your friends by clicking below.

 

130 years later, scientists may have 'rediscovered' 8th wonder of world

Scientists may have “re-discovered” the 8th wonder of the world in New Zealand, some 131 years after it was buried by the ferocious eruption of a nearby volcano, a new study suggests.

Officially, there were seven wonders of the world, including the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Pyramid of Giza, the Statue of Zeus at Olympia and the Lighthouse of Alexandria, among others.

But at various times throughout history, candidates for another “wonder” have popped up, and the famed Pink and White Terraces of New Zealand were sometimes referred to as the 8th wonder of the world.

Read more. 

(Photo: Getty Images/Robert Harding World Imagery)

okay so i just spent a good 10 minutes analysing the AC Origins trailer because the Egyptologist in me needs to know things so i thought i’d share w/ y’all what I think i’ve gleaned

  • its set sometime between 280BC and 30BC (and looking online it says the 1st Century BC so booyah)
    • There’s a lighthouse - most probably the Pharos Lighthouse in Alexandria. Which also means Alexandria is a visitable place
    • Siwa and the Temple of Amun is prominent and it’s a ram-themed Amun. Siwa was like the equivalent of say, the Vatican (not quite but you get the idea) in that it’s oracle was the most revered through the entire Egyptian and Hellenistic world. You probably won’t fistfight the Siwa Oracle tho.
      • Slightly petty note - Siwa was called Sekht-am by the Egyptians but I’m gonna guess thats handwavey translation.
    • Anubis is mentioned - he only really became popular in later times and while I can understand the links between assassins/anubis i thought i’d add it.
  • possible enemies: Rome
    • honestly Rome’s in everyone’s grill but they’ve annihilated Carthage by this time and they’re most definitely eyeing up Egypt (except julius caesar’s gotta put his dick in Cleopatra first, and then Mark Antony has to, and then-)
    • The Seleucid Empire (Persia) is having its own troubles with Rome and depending on when its set is also dependant on whether said Empire is still around.
  • also it’s very plausible for their to be ruins and suchlike of the old temples because the pyramids are literally 2000 years old. The Sphinx may also be buried in sand again.

Sidenote:

Main dude is called “medjay” which is a term that had died out long before the time period stated. It was used in the Old/Middle Kingdom as a sorta… desert scout and in the New Kingdom it was a term for the police force.

So unless they’re The Mummying this thing and just saying “medjay” is what the assassins were before they were assassins then. yea

idk if anyone’ll find this interesting lmfao

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royal meme | monarchs 3/10

Kleopatra Selene II was born in late 40 BCE, the daughter of Kleopatra VII, the Macedonian Greek queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and Mark Antony, triumvir of Rome.

“For the first ten years of her life Selene had been raised in Egypt as an Egyptian princess at an Egyptian court; the fact that her father was a Roman citizen, former consul and triumvir was virtually irrelevant at this stage of her life. However, once both of her parents were dead and Egypt had ceased to exist as an independent kingdom, the question of  what to do with Selene and her brothers needed to be answered. In the absence of any surviving relatives, responsibility for them passed to Octavian and he in turn passed it to Octavia. The children lived in Octavia’s house on the Palatine Hill…Augustus had gradually accumulated a collection of royal children…one of the latter was Gaius Julius Juba, the son of King Juba of Numidia (modern-day Algeria, Tunisia and Libya), who had committed suicide in 46 BCE after being defeated by Caesar at the Battle of Thapsus. Only a baby at the time, Juba had been taken back to Rome by Caesar and exhibited in the African section of his quadruple triumph. He had subsequently been raised in Caesar’s household until the dictator’s assassination in 44 BCE when custody of the child seems to have passed to Octavian and Octavia. Juba was awarded Roman citizenship and spent his childhood and adolescence in Rome during which time he was given a Roman education and encouraged in intellectual pursuits, which led to him writing scholarly treatises on a range of subjects. Although Octavia had herself been unlucky in love,she was apparently something of a matchmaker. In 25 BCE she was instrumental in arranging a marriage between Selene and Juba.

Keep reading

Isis Pharia, copper drachma of Hadrian, minted in Alexandria in 133/4 C.E.

Today, April 25, marks the annual ancient Roman rite in honor of Isis Pharia, the protector of the Pharos, or Lighthouse, of Alexandria. Regarded as one one the wonders of the ancient world, the Lighthouse of Alexandria was designed by Sostratos of Knidos and completed in 270 B.C.E. during the reign oft Ptolemy II.

Isis Pharia is the protector of light houses and harbors. Pharos is the name of the island on which the lighthouse stood, and pharos is the Greek word for sail, which Isis is said to have invented, so the image of Isis holding a billowing sail while standing next to the lightbouse is a visual pun which would have been understood by the illiterate.

Apuleius of Madauros praised Isis with these words in his novel, The Golden Ass

 On land as well as at sea, you are She who chases away all storms and dangers from our lives by your right hand. Likewise you restrain the fatal dispositions, appease the great tempests of fortune and keep back the course of the stars. 

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ancient history meme | women ( 2/7)

“A brave young woman who has always fought for what was right even when it was unpopular”. – Michelle Moran, ‘Cleopatra’s Daughter’

Kleopatra Selene II was born in late 40 BCE, the daughter of Kleopatra VII, the Macedonian Greek queen of Ptolemaic Egypt, and Mark Antony, triumvir of Rome. 

“For the first ten years of her life Selene had been raised in Egypt as an Egyptian princess at an Egyptian court; the fact that her father was a Roman citizen, former consul and triumvir was virtually irrelevant at this stage of her life. However, once both of her parents were dead and Egypt had ceased to exist as an independent kingdom, the question of  what to do with Selene and her brothers needed to be answered. In the absence of any surviving relatives, responsibility for them passed to Octavian and he in turn passed it to Octavia. The children lived in Octavia’s house on the Palatine Hill…Augustus had gradually accumulated a collection of royal children…one of the latter was Gaius Julius Juba, the son of King Juba of Numidia (modern-day Algeria, Tunisia and Libya), who had committed suicide in 46 BCE after being defeated by Caesar at the Battle of Thapsus. Only a baby at the time, Juba had been taken back to Rome by Caesar and exhibited in the African section of his quadruple triumph. He had subsequently been raised in Caesar’s household until the dictator’s assassination in 44 BCE when custody of the child seems to have passed to Octavian and Octavia. Juba was awarded Roman citizenship and spent his childhood and adolescence in Rome during which time he was given a Roman education and encouraged in intellectual pursuits, which led to him writing scholarly treatises on a range of subjects. Although Octavia had herself been unlucky in love,she was apparently something of a matchmaker. In 25 BCE she was instrumental in arranging a marriage between Selene and Juba.

The young couple had had their lives turned upside down as a result of the actions of their parents. Once they arrived in Mauretania they were free to make their own decisions, accountable to no one, except possibly Augustus. They had much to do: the new kingdom of Mauretania was a vast territory, encompassing modern-day Algeria and Morocco, rather than modern-day Mauritania… [Selene] possessed enough prestige to rule alongside her husband as a queen in her own right and consistently referred to her Greek and Ptolemaic heritage on the coins she issued in her own name as well as those she issued in conjunction with Juba. Their new kingdom was in serious need of modernisation, so they refounded [the capital] Iol as Caesarea in honour of their benefactor Augustus. They filled Caesarea with grandiose buildings inspired by those of Rome and also of Alexandria. These included a lighthouse in the style of the Alexandrian Pharos, set up on an island in the harbour, a royal palace situated on the seafront and numerous temples to Roman and Egyptian deities. Their royal court attracted scholars and artists from across the Roman Empire and became a cosmopolitan fusion of Greek, Roman and Egyptian culture. The couple ruled Mauretania for almost two decades, until Selene’s early death at the age of 35. Judging from a second commemorative epigram written by Crinagoras of Mytilene, her death seems to have coincided with a lunar eclipse, which would place it on or around March 23rd, 5 BCE.”  - Jane Draycoff

Replica Pharos Lighthouse plans approved

Plans to rebuild one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, the Pharos Lighthouse, have been approved by Egyptian authorities, it’s reported.

The feat of ancient engineering, which is also known as the Lighthouse of Alexandria, was completed around 280BC, and is estimated to have been between 110m and 130m high. The plan is to rebuild the lighthouse a few metres away from where it once stood in the coastal city of Alexandria, as the original location is now occupied by the Qaitbay Citadel, the Cairo Post reports. Egypt’s permanent committee on antiquities has approved the proposal and now it’s just down to the Alexandria’s regional government to sign-off on it, Dr Mostafa Amin, secretary general of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, tells the Youm7 website. Read more.

The signs as the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
  • Aries: Mausoleum at Halicarnassus
  • Taurus: Statue of Zeus at Olympia
  • Gemini: Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
  • Cancer: Lighthouse of Alexandria
  • Leo: Colossus of Rhodes
  • Virgo: Hanging Gardens of Babylon
  • Libra: Great Pyramid of Giza
  • Scorpio: Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
  • Sagittarius: Mausoleum at Halicarnassus
  • Capricorn: Hanging Gardens of Babylon
  • Aquarius: Statue of Zeus at Olympia
  • Pisces: Lighthouse of Alexandria
The signs as Seven Wonders of the Ancient world

Great Pyramid of Giza: Scorpio, Virgo, Capricorn

Hanging Gardens of Babylon: Libra, Taurus, Pisces

Statue of Zeus at Olympia: Leo, Gemini, Pisces 

Temple of Artemis: Capricorn, Gemini, Libra

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus: Libra, Scorpio, Aquarius 

Colossus of Rhodes: Leo, Aries, Sagittarius

Lighthouse of Alexandria: Aquarius, Cancer, Virgo

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July 21st 356 BCE: Temple of Artemis destroyed

On this day in 356 BCE, the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, Turkey - one of the seven wonders of the ancient world - was destroyed in an act of arson. The great temple was commissioned around 550 BCE by Croesus, king of Lydia, and designed by Cretan architect Cherisiphron, to worship the Greek goddess Artemis, daughter of Zeus and Leto, who was believed to have been born at Ephesus. The statue of Artemis that resided the temple, however, borrowed from depictions of Eastern goddess Cybele, demonstrating the religious syncretism common at Ephesus. The temple was famous for its marble construction, exquisite art, and sheer scale, measuring around 110 by 55 metres and including 127 sixty-foot columns. These physical features were described by Pliny, and, coupled with its importance as a pilgrimage site, led contemporary writers to declare the Temple of Artemis a wonder of the ancient world. The temple was set on fire by a madman named Herostratus, who sought personal fame; it certainly worked, though at the time Ephesians forbade anyone from mentioning his name. The date for this act of arson is largely based on the tradition that it coincided with the birth of Alexander the Great, with the story going that Artemis was too preoccupied delivering Alexander to save the temple. A reconstruction of the temple was destroyed by invading Goths in 262 CE, and another reconstruction was destroyed in 401, but as most Ephesians had by then converted to Christianity the pagan temple was not rebuilt. Now all that remains of the Temple of Artemis are fragments and individual items, many of which reside in the British Museum. 

“I have set eyes on the wall of lofty Babylon on which is a road for chariots, and the statue of Zeus by the Alpheus, and the hanging gardens, and the colossus of the Sun, and the huge labour of the high pyramids, and the vast tomb of Mausolus; but when I saw the house of Artemis that mounted to the clouds, those other marvels lost their brilliancy
- Antipater of Sidon on the ancient wonders